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SCIENCE
May 15, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Scientists have added two species of ape and monkey to the evolutionary tree, filling in a 10-million-year gap in the fossil record from a period when apes and Old World monkeys diverged. Fossil specimens of jaws and teeth, collected by Ohio University researchers in the Rukwa Rift Basin of Tanzania, date the primates to about 25.2 million years ago. Each was probably  evolving separately by then, according to the scientists, whose work was published in the journal Nature. Rukwapithecus fleaglei was identified as a hominoid predecessor to the modern ape or chimpanzee, and Nsungwepithecus gunnelli was believed to be an early cercopithecoid, or Old World monkey, similar to a baboon or macaque.
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SCIENCE
May 7, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Would Ice Age man understand us? It may depend on the words we choose. Digging through languages in Eurasia for "fossil" words that have escaped erosion over time, researchers say they have identified an ancestral language that existed as far as 15,000 years ago. This ancient language, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may have given rise to several different language groups - including Indo-European, which boasts roughly...
SCIENCE
April 17, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
They're big, they're furtive, they're weird-looking. You almost certainly wouldn't want to dine on one, since they're endangered and are said to cause digestive distress in people who eat them. But the African coelacanth is extremely useful in at least one way, said Jessica Alfoldi, a research scientist at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass.  Because it resembles ancient marine ancestors, it's a beloved subject for biologists trying to figure out how land vertebrates' fish forebears first climbed out from oceans, some 400 million years ago. On Wednesday the fish became even more valuable for researchers, as Alfoldi and an international team of collaborators published a draft of the coelocanth's genome in the journal Nature . The genome, a record of the 2.86 billion DNA letter pairs that make up the strange beast's genetic blueprint, could help scientists answer a host of questions about land creatures' evolution -- for instance, how fins became limbs, or how animals developed placentas.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Scientists have discovered some of the oldest dinosaur embryos ever found - a rare collection of delicate fossils that offer an unprecedented look into the remarkably speedy early development of these enormous animals. The bed of Lufengosaurus bones and smashed eggshell, described in Thursday's edition of the journal Nature , may also provide some insight into the growth of birds and other dinosaur relatives. “There's nothing like this that has been discovered before,” said Luis Chiappe, a dinosaur paleontologist at the Natural History Museum of L.A. County, who was not involved in the study.
SCIENCE
April 5, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Like the offset eyes on a Picasso portrait, the volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io seem to be strangely shifted, according to a study by NASA and ESA scientists. Io's clustered volcanoes seem to be lying 30 to 60 degrees eastward of where they were expected, according to a paper published this year in Earth and Planetary Science Letters. The study could shed light on the internal dynamics of Jupiter's volcano-pocked moon. Io's internal heat comes from the kneading it gets from Jupiter and its fellow moons.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Will scientists soon be able to revive the long-extinct woolly mammoth? What about the dodo, the Chinese river dolphin or the saber-toothed cat? With the great technological leaps forward over the past decade, bringing back dead-and-gone species using DNA preserved in fossils might be possible in the near future, researchers said this month at a TEDx event in Washington, D.C. That doesn't mean Jurassic Park will ever become a reality; ...
AUTOS
March 19, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
A new National Research Council report says the U.S. may be able to reduce fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 in light-duty cars and trucks. The highly ambitious goal could be reached, the report says, through a combination of more efficient vehicles and the use of gasoline and diesel alternatives such as bio-fuels, electricity and hydrogen. "To reach the 2050 goals for reducing petroleum use and greenhouse gases, vehicles must become dramatically more efficient, regardless of how they are powered," said Douglas M. Chapin, principal of MPR Associates and chairman of the committee that wrote the report.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama's nominee to steer the Interior Department, REI Chief Executive Sally Jewell, vowed Thursday to balance competing demands on public lands for conservation and resource exploitation. But several senators of both parties expressed wariness of Jewell's involvement in conservation groups, suggesting that she might not adequately support fossil fuel development on federal acreage. Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) has focused on Jewell's tenure on the board of the National Parks Conservation Assn., an advocacy group for the nation's parks, as a possible barrier to her fairness.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Karl Lagerfeld's highly anticipated collection of watches for Fossil is scheduled to launch Thursday.  The collection includes seven styles for men and women, priced at $150 to $595. One style, the Zip, has a wristband that can be widened by adding zip-on sections. Other styles include studs, metallic leather, chains and other embellishments. Locally, the collection is available at Gregory's , 147 N. Robertson Blvd., Beverly Hills. Other launches Los Angeles-based sportswear label Feel the Piece has launched a new line, Tyler Jacobs for Feel the Piece, that is designed to showcase work by up-and-coming street artists.
SCIENCE
February 8, 2013 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
What's cute and furry and has a name only a paleontologist could love? A tiny theoretical creature dubbed the "hypothetical placental mammal ancestor" is stealing the hearts of some evolutionary biologists - and annoying others - as it raises new debate over just when our early mammal ancestors began diversifying across the globe. In a paper published this week in the journal Science, an international team of researchers described how they used a vast database of fossil and anatomical data, as well as DNA evidence, to reverse-engineer an ancestor to the largest group of living mammals.
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