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Foster Care California

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NEWS
May 17, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children under state protection in California group and foster homes are being drugged with potent, dangerous psychiatric medications, at times just to keep them obedient and docile for their overburdened caretakers.
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OPINION
March 12, 2009
For years, thousands of California youths were abused or neglected twice over -- first by parents who couldn't or wouldn't provide basic care, then by governmental agencies that sent them to live with strangers instead of extended family, only to cut them off from all support on their 18th birthdays.
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NEWS
May 19, 1997 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the emotional and often divisive debate over what to do with society's abused, neglected and abandoned children, at least one rule has long unified social scientists: Don't lock them up. To deprive already traumatized children of their freedom is to perpetuate a cycle of degradation, so the doctrine goes.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judges, psychiatrists and government officials are developing an unprecedented plan to protect abused children in the state's care from receiving improper and unmonitored doses of potent psychiatric medications.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judges, psychiatrists and government officials are developing an unprecedented plan to protect abused children in the state's care from receiving improper and unmonitored doses of potent psychiatric medications.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 5:30 a.m., the street lights are still on outside the Tustin group home where 5-year-old Steven, warm and rumpled from his bed, gulps down his first Ritalin dose of the day. Half an hour later, the drug's effects have yet to take hold, and Steven, in his pajamas, is hopping like a frog on the couch, doing flips off the arm--like any rowdy kindergartner. "He should calm down pretty soon," says a child-care worker.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judges, psychiatrists and government officials are developing an unprecedented plan to protect abused children in the state's care from improper and unmonitored doses of potent psychiatric medications. The effort, which is intended to lead to reform legislation, is in response to a Times investigation in May that found that thousands of children in California's group and foster homes are routinely given psychiatric drugs, at times simply to keep them docile for their overburdened caretakers.
OPINION
March 12, 2009
For years, thousands of California youths were abused or neglected twice over -- first by parents who couldn't or wouldn't provide basic care, then by governmental agencies that sent them to live with strangers instead of extended family, only to cut them off from all support on their 18th birthdays.
OPINION
September 17, 2010 | By Miles Cooley and George White
A partner in a large Los Angeles law firm and a 17-year-old kid from Compton wouldn't appear to have a lot in common. But both of our lives have been indelibly marked by the violence and neglect in our early lives, and changed by California's foster care system. So we speak from experience when we urge Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to sign a bill (AB 12) that would enable our state to collect federal dollars dedicated to boosting foster kids' chances of success. Miles was kidnapped and held for days by drug dealers in Sacramento when he was 2 years old, and at just 5 years old found his mother dead of a drug overdose.
OPINION
September 3, 2013 | By Janis Spire
Los Angeles County's child welfare system, as noted recently by this newspaper, is facing a critical shortage of foster homes. But a simple policy shift could go a long way toward eliminating this crisis. We need to provide better support for relatives who step up and become foster parents. Relatives are the backbone of the county's child welfare system. They care for children with the highest needs at a moment's notice, and they provide stability in an otherwise chaotic system. Relatives can help children in county care remain connected to their families and provide them with a sense of community.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judges, psychiatrists and government officials are developing an unprecedented plan to protect abused children in the state's care from improper and unmonitored doses of potent psychiatric medications. The effort, which is intended to lead to reform legislation, is in response to a Times investigation in May that found that thousands of children in California's group and foster homes are routinely given psychiatric drugs, at times simply to keep them docile for their overburdened caretakers.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children under state protection in California group and foster homes are being drugged with potent, dangerous psychiatric medications, at times just to keep them obedient and docile for their overburdened caretakers.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 5:30 a.m., the street lights are still on outside the Tustin group home where 5-year-old Steven, warm and rumpled from his bed, gulps down his first Ritalin dose of the day. Half an hour later, the drug's effects have yet to take hold, and Steven, in his pajamas, is hopping like a frog on the couch, doing flips off the arm--like any rowdy kindergartner. "He should calm down pretty soon," says a child-care worker.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the emotional and often divisive debate over what to do with society's abused, neglected and abandoned children, at least one rule has long unified social scientists: Don't lock them up. To deprive already traumatized children of their freedom is to perpetuate a cycle of degradation, so the doctrine goes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county Department of Children's Services, despite its progress toward correcting serious flaws in child welfare programs, will not regain the authority to license foster care homes soon, state officials told a government watchdog panel Wednesday. High-ranking officials of the state Department of Social Services testified in Los Angeles before the Commission on California State Government Organization and Economy, informally known as the Little Hoover Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2006 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered California to provide mental health services that could keep thousands of foster children out of institutions. The order comes in a 3-year-old class-action lawsuit challenging the practice of sending foster children to group homes or hospitals for mental health care. Advocates for foster children say appropriate mental health services could keep them in homes and communities. There are more than 80,000 children in foster care in California.
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