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Foundation For The Junior Blind

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1994 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 69-year-old foster grandparent who did volunteer work with blind children was in extremely critical condition Tuesday after being shot point-blank in the eye by teen-age muggers as she waited for a bus, according to police and relatives. Amalia C. Sison, a volunteer at the Foundation for the Junior Blind in Southwest Los Angeles, was confronted by two teen-agers Monday at a bus stop behind the facility and shot in the left eye with a .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1994
Amalia C. Sison, a resident of a central city retirement home, used to travel across town by bus to work as a volunteer at the Foundation for the Junior Blind in Windsor Hills. No longer. On Tuesday the 69-year-old foster-grandmother hovered near death, the victim of two teen-age attackers who shot her in the eye as she waited at a bus stop behind the foundation. If we had stronger gun control, would the two youngsters who attacked Sison merely have stabbed her?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1990
William Leslie Olsen, retired president of City National Bank in Beverly Hills, has died at his Woodland Hills home. He was 71. Olsen spent 29 years with the bank and served as president from 1974 to 1986. Olsen died Sunday of lung cancer, said his son, Michael Olsen. Born Jan. 19, 1919, in Grand Rapids, Mich., Olsen was raised on the South Side of Chicago. He served as a bombardier in the Air Corps during World War II.
NEWS
September 22, 1985
Austeene Cooper Watkins, a Los Angeles philanthropist who nearly 40 years ago began providing the magical world of theater for deprived children, is dead at age 98. She died Sept. 14 at her Hancock Park home. In 1946, with more than four decades of Red Cross service already behind her, Mrs. Watkins launched, through the Nine O'Clock Players of the Assistance League, a program of free theater for children living in the poorer sections of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996 | ED BOND
How hot was it this weekend? So hot that the usual crowds did not turn out for the annual Watermelon Festival at Sunland Park. This was the 35th edition of the festival, which is the main fund-raiser for the Sunland-Tujunga Lions Club. Early Sunday afternoon, only a few dozen people braved the heat to go on the rides and eat the festival's namesake. The club charges no admission but raises money from ride tickets and prize drawings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991
Stan Palmer, who taught elementary school in the San Fernando Valley for 34 years, has died at a Studio City convalescent hospital. He was 63. Palmer, a resident of Van Nuys, died Monday of cancer, said his ex-wife and longtime friend, Joan Palmer of Glendale. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Palmer served in the Army during World War II and came to California in the late 1940s. He earned a bachelor's degree in cinema arts from USC and a master's degree in school administration from Cal State Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1985
Austeene Cooper Watkins, a Los Angeles philanthropist who nearly 40 years ago began providing the magical world of theater for deprived children, is dead at age 98. She died Sept. 14 at her Hancock Park home. In 1946, with more than four decades of Red Cross service already behind her, Mrs. Watkins launched, through the Nine O'Clock Players of the Assistance League, a program of free theater for children living in the poorer sections of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995
They may not bear the names Carl Lewis or Jackie Joyner Kersee, but the teen-agers at Camp Bloomfield are Olympians in their own right. About 130 blind or visually impaired athletes from across the United States came together Wednesday to compete in the annual Olympics Day event at the camp in Malibu. They raced 100-yard dashes, swam relays, hurled their bodies over the high-jump bar, hobbled along in three-legged races and fought one another in tug-of-war contests.
NEWS
February 20, 1989
Los Angeles developer Sheldon L. Pollack, who designed and built Marina del Rey's Fisherman's Village, died in the crash of his private plane in a remote area of southeastern Arizona, a family spokeswoman said Sunday. Pollack, 62, a pilot for more than 30 years, was flying his twin-engine Cessna on a business trip from Monterey to Las Cruces, N.M., on Tuesday when ground controllers lost contact with the plane, said his daughter, Eileen Pollack Erickson. The wreckage was found at the base of Mt.
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