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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2002 | PATRICIA BRENNAN, WASHINGTON POST
"The Pulse," a newsmagazine-style series that premieres Thursday at 9 p.m. on the Fox broadcast network, owes its underpinnings to cable's Fox News Channel: It's anchored by FNC's Shepard Smith and executive-produced by William Shine, who also is FNC's executive producer. And FNC's Bill O'Reilly will get a segment called "Guess Who's Annoying Me Now," recalling Andy Rooney's segment on "60 Minutes." "I would never compare Bill O'Reilly to Andy Rooney," Shine said. "Bill's straightforward.
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SPORTS
December 13, 2001 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sparking renewed speculation that the Dodgers might be sold, NewsCorp chairman Rupert Murdoch said Fox has achieved the primary business objective it had for purchasing the team, despite two years of staggering financial losses. With the Dodgers in Fox hands, the Walt Disney Co. surrendered in the race to launch a second local cable sports channel, Murdoch told a national television audience in a rare interview this week.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2001 | Bloomberg News
News Corp.'s Fox television network will suspend its children's programming on weekday afternoons and give the two-hour block back to its affiliated TV stations in local markets. The 2 to 4 p.m. time period that now airs Fox Kids shows will be returned to the stations starting Dec. 31, Fox said in a statement. Fox Kids programming will still run for four hours on Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2001 | Brian Lowry
The most-watched night of baseball in a decade capped a World Series that helped Fox cross the plate with its highest weekly average since broadcasting the 1999 Super Bowl, based on viewing estimates issued Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2001
Actors and studio executives, both lacking the stomach for a strike, breathed a collective sigh of relief Wednesday after negotiators for actors' unions and movie and TV producers reached tentative agreement on a new three-year contract. Actors particularly were gratified that they will be getting more money for shows rerun on cable TV. They also were pleased that Fox Broadcasting Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2001 | WILLIAM KECK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Regis Philbin and his wife Joy watch it every Saturday night from their weekend home in Connecticut. Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins view it with their children--ages 8, 11 and 15--who choose the hour as part of the 90 minutes of TV viewing they are allotted each week. Among teens, a small piece of the total viewing pie but one that advertisers crave, Fox executives say it now tops NBC's "Saturday Night Live."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So what, exactly, would someone have to do in order to be kept off Fox's hit "reality" series "Temptation Island," how long would it take the network and producers to find out, and what would they tell viewers if they did? In next week's episode, two contestants from the show, Taheed Watson and Ytossie Patterson, will be removed for misleading the producers about the fact they had a child together.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The launch of Fox's controversial new "reality" series, "Temptation Island," in which unmarried couples test their relationships by mingling with singles, has been clouded by the revelation that one of the couples have a child. Executives for Fox acknowledged Wednesday that the couple had misrepresented information about their background and their child, and that the discovery of the child came during filming.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2000 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Internet entertainment site Icebox.com said Tuesday that it has sold one of its online series to Fox Broadcasting Co., marking the first time a show created for the Net has been purchased by a major television network. But even as Icebox announced the deal, the company laid off about 50 of its 100 employees Tuesday, underscoring the ongoing financial pressures in the online entertainment space.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Malcolm in the Middle" no longer just refers to its title character's place in his family--it also reflects the sitcom's positioning in the crucial fall sweeps period. In an unusual strategy, Fox executives will pepper November with originals of its hit Sunday comedy, running two new episodes each week in hopes of gaining an anchor on Wednesday nights, while keeping Sundays strong.
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