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Framingham Heart Study

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HEALTH
May 18, 2009 | Amber Dance
Framingham, Mass., calls itself "the town that changed America's heart." For 60 years, the town's residents have returned again and again to be poked and prodded at the Framingham Heart Study offices -- though the exact address has changed a few times. Some have been coming every two years since 1948; now their children and grandchildren too offer their time and bodies.
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SCIENCE
November 13, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Fifteen years after they have weight-loss surgery, almost a third of patients who had Type 2 diabetes at the time they were operated on remain free of the metabolic disorder, a new study says. And six years following such surgery, patients had shaved their probability of suffering a heart attack over the next 10 years by 40%, their stroke risk by 42%, and their likelihood of dying over the next five years by 18%, additional research has concluded. The two studies, both presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery in Atlanta, offer the first indications of weight-loss surgery's longer-term health benefits for patients.
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HEALTH
May 18, 2009 | By Amber Dance, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It turned a whole town into a research lab. It was the first to show the world that high cholesterol and obesity put people at risk for heart disease -- the first, in fact, to coin the very term "risk factor. " And it still hasn't run out of juice. The longest-running heart health study in the world, the 60-year-old Framingham Heart Study, continues to mine its vast data set for causes or signs of heart trouble. Before Framingham, which began recruiting subjects in the Massachusetts town in 1948, heart disease was something that just happened.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
A twenty- or thirtysomething adult with blood pressure that's even a little high is risking damage to the structural integrity of his brain that may be evident by the age of 40, says a new study. The early appearance of hypertension's toll on the brain suggests that physicians should act sooner and more aggressively to control the upward creep of blood pressure in their younger patients, say the authors of the latest research, published online in the Lancet on Thursday. Neurologists at UC Davis led a study that looked at 579 third-generation participants of the famous Framingham Heart Study.
HEALTH
May 18, 2009 | Amber Dance
It turned a whole town into a research lab. It was the first to show the world that high cholesterol and obesity put people at risk for heart disease -- the first, in fact, to coin the very term "risk factor." And it still hasn't run out of juice. The longest-running heart health study in the world, the 60-year-old Framingham Heart Study, continues to mine its vast data set for causes or signs of heart trouble.
NEWS
June 18, 1989
Joseph Stokes III, 64, one of the principal investigators of the world's longest-running heart study and the first dean of the medical school at UC San Diego. A cardiologist and epidemiologist, Stokes was an investigator for the renowned Framingham Heart Study which began in 1948 with 5,209 residents of the central Massachusetts city of Framingham. The project monitors patterns, causes and inhibitors of cardiovascular disease and remains the world's longest running project of its kind.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
A twenty- or thirtysomething adult with blood pressure that's even a little high is risking damage to the structural integrity of his brain that may be evident by the age of 40, says a new study. The early appearance of hypertension's toll on the brain suggests that physicians should act sooner and more aggressively to control the upward creep of blood pressure in their younger patients, say the authors of the latest research, published online in the Lancet on Thursday. Neurologists at UC Davis led a study that looked at 579 third-generation participants of the famous Framingham Heart Study.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Pop quiz: Which of the following causes the brain to shrink? 1) diabetes 2) smoking 3) high blood pressure 4) being overweight in middle age? Answer: All four. That's the latest word from the famous Framingham Heart Study , an investigation of residents of a Massachusetts town that's been going on since 1948.    This particular report, published in the journal Neurology, tracked 1,352 people with an average age of 54 for years. All were offspring of the original set of Framingham residents who agreed to join the study.
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Having a relative who developed atrial fibrillation -- an uncontrolled fluttering of the heart that makes it difficult to pump blood -- before the age of 65 triples your risk of developing the condition, researchers said Saturday. If the relative develops the condition after the age of 65, your risk is increased by 40%, independent of other risk factors, they reported at a Chicago meeting of the American Heart Assn. and online in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers knew that the risk of developing the disorder had a hereditary component, but they did not previously know how large the risk was.  An estimated 2.2 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation, which is caused by erratic electrical signals triggering contractions of the heart.
NATIONAL
December 31, 2004 | From Associated Press
The obesity epidemic is reaching down to the sandbox: More than 10% of U.S. children ages 2 to 5 are overweight, the American Heart Assn. reported Thursday. That is up from 7% in 1994, according to the association's annual statistical report on heart disease and stroke. The 10% figure is for 2002, the most recent year for which statistics are available, and the situation is probably worse now, said Dr. Robert H. Eckel, president-elect of the heart association and a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Pop quiz: Which of the following causes the brain to shrink? 1) diabetes 2) smoking 3) high blood pressure 4) being overweight in middle age? Answer: All four. That's the latest word from the famous Framingham Heart Study , an investigation of residents of a Massachusetts town that's been going on since 1948.    This particular report, published in the journal Neurology, tracked 1,352 people with an average age of 54 for years. All were offspring of the original set of Framingham residents who agreed to join the study.
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Having a relative who developed atrial fibrillation -- an uncontrolled fluttering of the heart that makes it difficult to pump blood -- before the age of 65 triples your risk of developing the condition, researchers said Saturday. If the relative develops the condition after the age of 65, your risk is increased by 40%, independent of other risk factors, they reported at a Chicago meeting of the American Heart Assn. and online in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Researchers knew that the risk of developing the disorder had a hereditary component, but they did not previously know how large the risk was.  An estimated 2.2 million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation, which is caused by erratic electrical signals triggering contractions of the heart.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Is sadness a sickness? It appears to spread like one, a new study has found. Researchers at Harvard University and MIT wanted to see if a mathematical model developed to track and predict the spread of infectious diseases such as SARS and foot-and-mouth disease could also apply to the spread of happiness -- and found that it worked. They used data collected from 1,880 subjects in the Framingham Heart Study, a long-term research effort that has followed subjects since 1948 (and added some new ones along the way)
SCIENCE
June 24, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A common heart abnormality often seen of electrocardiograms that has long been thought to be inconsequential is actually associated with a substantially increased risk of erratic heartbeats or a need for a pacemaker -- and with a modestly increased risk of death, researchers reported today.
HEALTH
May 18, 2009 | By Amber Dance, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It turned a whole town into a research lab. It was the first to show the world that high cholesterol and obesity put people at risk for heart disease -- the first, in fact, to coin the very term "risk factor. " And it still hasn't run out of juice. The longest-running heart health study in the world, the 60-year-old Framingham Heart Study, continues to mine its vast data set for causes or signs of heart trouble. Before Framingham, which began recruiting subjects in the Massachusetts town in 1948, heart disease was something that just happened.
HEALTH
May 18, 2009 | Amber Dance
It turned a whole town into a research lab. It was the first to show the world that high cholesterol and obesity put people at risk for heart disease -- the first, in fact, to coin the very term "risk factor." And it still hasn't run out of juice. The longest-running heart health study in the world, the 60-year-old Framingham Heart Study, continues to mine its vast data set for causes or signs of heart trouble.
SCIENCE
June 24, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A common heart abnormality often seen of electrocardiograms that has long been thought to be inconsequential is actually associated with a substantially increased risk of erratic heartbeats or a need for a pacemaker -- and with a modestly increased risk of death, researchers reported today.
NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Is sadness a sickness? It appears to spread like one, a new study has found. Researchers at Harvard University and MIT wanted to see if a mathematical model developed to track and predict the spread of infectious diseases such as SARS and foot-and-mouth disease could also apply to the spread of happiness -- and found that it worked. They used data collected from 1,880 subjects in the Framingham Heart Study, a long-term research effort that has followed subjects since 1948 (and added some new ones along the way)
HEALTH
May 18, 2009 | Amber Dance
Framingham, Mass., calls itself "the town that changed America's heart." For 60 years, the town's residents have returned again and again to be poked and prodded at the Framingham Heart Study offices -- though the exact address has changed a few times. Some have been coming every two years since 1948; now their children and grandchildren too offer their time and bodies.
OPINION
January 4, 2008
Re "No meeting of the minds -- yet," Dec. 27 The Times article on Alzheimer's disease mentions the role of mutation of the ApoE protein, which destroys cholesterol. The nation's longest-running heart health study, the Framingham Heart Study, has found that high cholesterol correlates positively with maintaining high cognitive functioning as people age. The higher the cholesterol levels, the better is memory, attention and concentration. Our brains are largely composed of cholesterol, so perhaps the mutated protein is removing too much cholesterol from the brain, thereby causing the changes observed in Alzheimer's.
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