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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1999
Did you know that the French version of the Fourth of July celebrates a spectacular jailbreak? On July 14, 1789, the people of Paris revolted against the oppressive reign of King Louis XVI by storming the state prison, the Bastille. Thus began the French Revolution, which resulted in France becoming a democracy marked by Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite (Liberty, Equality, Brotherhood).
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
SAN ANTONIO -- While the Lakers prepared for their last game of the season, Kobe Bryant was already beginning his off-season. Bryant went to France with family members either Tuesday or Wednesday, the Los Angeles Times has learned. The Lakers conclude their season Wednesday night against the San Antonio Spurs. A team spokesman said he was unaware of the situation and referred a reporter to Bryant's agent, Rob Pelinka, who did not immediately return a phone call. Bryant has been in a surly mood since the team's fortunes started sagging, muttering under his breath at last month's team photo that he doesn't like associating with a team so many games under .500.
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SPORTS
April 10, 2010
World Cup 2010: FRANCE FIFA ranking: 8 Overall World Cup record: 25-16-10 Coach: Raymond Domenech Best performance: Winner 1998 Overview: Having been steered into the World Cup by the hand of Thierry Henry, a foul that went uncalled in a qualifying playoff win over Ireland, and coming off Zinedine Zidane's infamous head butt in the 2006 Cup final, the French will not be widely popular, especially among referees....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By David Ng
An auction of Nazi memorabilia, including items that belonged to Adolf Hitler and Hermann Goering, has been called off in France following objections from Jewish groups and a prominent government official. The Paris auction company Vermot de Pas had scheduled the sale for April 26 but called it off Monday. The cancellation came soon after French culture minister Aurélie Filippetti told Le Monde she didn't want the auction to take place. The auction house said on its website that "in light of the strong emotions from numerous people, this decision seems proper and necessary.
OPINION
November 16, 2013
Re "Stand by France," Opinion, Nov. 14 France's feisty objection to elements of the proposed Iran nuclear agreement may have merit, but Eric Edelman and Ray Takeyh are way off base writing that "France has an honorable history" in shielding the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and underlying norms. France has had a tradition of helping countries with suspect nuclear ambitions. Before the treaty, Paris provided Israel with the Dimona reactor that it knew would be used for weapons development.
WORLD
May 15, 2013 | By Kim Willsher
PARIS -- Beleaguered French President Francois Hollande suffered a further setback in his attempts to pull France out of its economic slump after official figures showed Wednesday that the country has entered a double-dip recession. Figures released by the country's National Statistics and Economic Study Institute showed that gross domestic product in the European Union's second-largest economy contracted 0.2% in the first quarter of 2013, matching a decline in the last quarter of 2012.
OPINION
January 2, 2014 | By Robert Zaretsky
For food, fashion and fast trains, few labels are more sought after, and rightly so, than "Made in France. " But when it comes to the making and unmaking of empires, not so much. Take the case of the Central African Republic. Three weeks ago, as bloody mayhem engulfed the CAR, François Hollande did what French presidents do best: He sent in the paratroops. With the blessing, and precious little else, of his European neighbors, Hollande declared his intention to protect 100 or so French nationals in Bangui, the capital, and to disarm both the outlawed Seleka fighters, overwhelmingly Muslim, and the vigilante anti-balaka (or "machete")
OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Pascal Bruckner
PARIS - Not long ago, I attended a colloquium of French scientists and philosophers in Corsica, France, called "How to Think About the Future. " With few exceptions, the astrophysicists, economists, physicians and social theorists on hand offered dark visions of tomorrow. A new financial crisis, water and grain shortages, endless war, a general collapse of ecosystems - we were spared no catastrophic scenario. A month earlier, I had been invited by the environmentalist think tank Breakthrough to San Francisco, where I reflected with a group of thinkers on the Schumpeterian economic idea of "creative destruction" and its application to energy production.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By David Ng
Officials in France returned three paintings that were confiscated by Nazi forces during World War II to the descendants of the paintings' rightful owners at a ceremony in Paris on Tuesday. The three works of art were a painting by 16th century Flemish artist Joos de Momper titled "Mountainous Landscape"; "Madonna and Child" by the 14th century Italian painter Lippo Memmi; and an 18th century portrait of a woman by an unknown painter. In a ceremony presided over by Aurélie Filippetti, France's minister of culture and communication, she said the French ministry of culture will be more proactive in researching the provenance of disputed works of art, according to a report in Le Monde.
WORLD
August 26, 2013 | By Henry Chu and Kim Willsher
LONDON -- The drumbeat for Western intervention in Syria, including possible military strikes, grew louder Monday in Europe, mostly at the urging of Britain and France. The two nations also led the European response to the war in Libya, but this time even Germany, which sat out that conflict, has thrown its support behind a forceful response. British Prime Minister David Cameron cut short a vacation to convene an emergency meeting of security advisers Tuesday or Wednesday and may summon Parliament from its summer recess.
TRAVEL
April 13, 2014
Vincent Bevins wrote that, "São Paulo was built by immigrants from Italy, Japan, Portugal and Lebanon, among others... " ["Culture by Day, Partying by Night," March 30]. That is quite an interesting tidbit about the place that received the majority of the slaves shipped to the Americas. I suppose they are the "among others. " John Anderson Chicago Airlines horror story We recently returned from Amman, Jordan, using Air France business class to Paris, and experienced a new level of disservice.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Foodies and flea market enthusiasts can sharpen their respective skills in this 10-day fall tour that combines lessons at a cooking school with visits to markets in Provence and the flea markets of Paris. The first leg includes seven nights in an 18th century farmhouse in St. Remy-de-Provence, two days of cooking instruction (for beginners or experts) with dinner, a visit to the St. Remy market, tours of several hill towns, including Gordes, Les Baux and Arles, and a trip to the L'Isle-sur-la-Sorgue Sunday market.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
MARCH 28-AUG. 25 'In the Land of Snow: Buddhist Art of the Himalayas' Pasadena's Norton Simon Museum is well-known for having the most impressive collection of European Old Master and early Modern paintings in Los Angeles. Less familiar is the museum's exceptional Indian, Nepalese and Tibetan art. This show will chronicle the movement of Buddhism from India to the Himalayas more than a thousand years ago, bringing numerous important loans together with superlative examples of painting, sculpture, ritual and decorative arts from the Simon's own collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By David Ng
Officials in France returned three paintings that were confiscated by Nazi forces during World War II to the descendants of the paintings' rightful owners at a ceremony in Paris on Tuesday. The three works of art were a painting by 16th century Flemish artist Joos de Momper titled "Mountainous Landscape"; "Madonna and Child" by the 14th century Italian painter Lippo Memmi; and an 18th century portrait of a woman by an unknown painter. In a ceremony presided over by Aurélie Filippetti, France's minister of culture and communication, she said the French ministry of culture will be more proactive in researching the provenance of disputed works of art, according to a report in Le Monde.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | Times staff and wire services
Alain Resnais, the French filmmaker whose intellectual experiments with time, memory and imagination yielded such celebrated films as "Last Year at Marienbad," has died. He was 91. Resnais was editing drafts of his next project even from his hospital bed, his longtime producer, Jean-Louis Livi, told the Associated Press. Resnais, who died Saturday, was renowned for reinventing himself during each of his full-length films, which included the acclaimed "Hiroshima Mon Amour" in 1959 and most recently "Life of Riley," which was honored at the Berlin Film Festival just weeks ago. In France, he won two Césars, the French equivalent of the Oscars, and, in 2009, received a lifetime achievement award at the Cannes International Film Festival.
OPINION
February 23, 2014 | By Pascal Bruckner
PARIS - Not long ago, I attended a colloquium of French scientists and philosophers in Corsica, France, called "How to Think About the Future. " With few exceptions, the astrophysicists, economists, physicians and social theorists on hand offered dark visions of tomorrow. A new financial crisis, water and grain shortages, endless war, a general collapse of ecosystems - we were spared no catastrophic scenario. A month earlier, I had been invited by the environmentalist think tank Breakthrough to San Francisco, where I reflected with a group of thinkers on the Schumpeterian economic idea of "creative destruction" and its application to energy production.
OPINION
December 21, 2011
The killing of more than a million Armenians by Ottoman Turks in 1915 was an act of genocide. The Holocaust was a fact. Yet Americans are free to deny the reality of either — or make outlandish assertions of all kinds — without facing punishment by the state. Residents of France will be denied that privilege if its parliament adopts a wrong-headed bill to criminalize denial of the Armenian genocide. On Thursday the lower house of France's parliament will debate a bill that would punish those who deny the genocide with a year in prison and a $58,000 fine.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
Mingling with extras in historical costumes and fans who called him "His Imperial Highness," Charles Napoleon sipped from a plastic cup and said matter-of-factly: "I gave my spit to be analyzed. " The affable businessman was referring to a recent study by a French scientist that matched his DNA to that of his great-great-grand-uncle, Napoleon Bonaparte I. Yes, that Napoleon Bonaparte. The study, part of an effort to reconstruct the genome of the 19th century emperor, may eventually help solve the mystery of whether the remains preserved in Napoleon's tomb in Les Invalides museum in Paris are really his. Napoleonic DNA was just one focus of avid discussion at recent festivities here marking the 198th anniversary of one of Napoleon's last military victories.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Seventy-two years after Nazis began deporting French Jews to concentration camps, the French government is negotiating to pay reparations for the first time to several hundred Holocaust survivors now living in the U.S. who survived unspeakable conditions while being transported in government-owned rail cars and in the death camps at the end of the line. Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said in an interview Friday that the French government entered into formal talks Feb. 6 and appeared to be intent on wrapping up negotiations by the end of the year.
SPORTS
February 20, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia - The fab threesome of U.S. freeskiers Joss Christensen, Gus Kenworthy and Nick Goepper landed on the cover of a limited-edition Kellogg's Corn Flakes cereal box after sweeping the slopestyle medals. Now that a French trio of ski cross racers - gold-medalist Jean Frederic Chapuis, silver-medalist Arnaud Bovolenta and bronze-medalist Jonathan Midol - have swept, what does that mean for their commercial futures in France? Probably very little. Instead, the skiers will be happy if it brings their sport more recognition.
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