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NEWS
July 25, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "Grapes of Wrath" has come to the new Europe. The promise of the good life amid bountiful fresh fruit that attracted the great migration of Dust Bowl residents to California appears to have had a similar effect on financially strapped Eastern Europeans who dream of a better life in Western Europe. A small article published recently in Polish and Czechoslovak newspapers only briefly mentioned the possibility of temporary jobs picking grapes in France during the upcoming fall harvest.
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NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A French appeals court upheld a radical farmer's three-month prison sentence for ransacking a McDonald's to protest unchecked globalization. Jose Bove, a 47-year-old sheep farmer, has become a symbol of anti-globalization activists in France and abroad since he led an attack on a McDonald's restaurant under construction in the southern town of Millau in August 1999.
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BUSINESS
June 8, 1996 | WILL PLATT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The town that put mustard on the map is confronting a foreign invasion: Nearly all the seeds that go into the famous spread are imported from Canada. France's top three condiment producers and the Agriculture Ministry have taken to the barricades to resist this assault on culinary patrimony. It is more than faith in the mustard seed that drives these companies.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Nations from Australia to Latvia slapped bans on European Union meat and livestock Wednesday, restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of a virulent disease that has cropped up among farm animals in France and Britain. Australia, New Zealand, South Korea and Norway were the latest countries to announce bans on imports of livestock and meat products from the 15-nation EU after foot-and-mouth disease was found Tuesday among cattle in northwestern France.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
The families of two French victims of a brain-wasting affliction filed a lawsuit Friday accusing French, British and European Union authorities of not acting quickly enough to stamp out "mad cow" disease. The suit, filed with investigating magistrates in Paris' county court, alleges that Laurence Duhamel, who died in February at 36 of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and 19-year-old Arnaud Eboli, who is stricken with the deadly disease, were victims of poisoning and involuntary homicide.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1995
French Fry Exports Soar: The ever-popular U.S. French fry is growing in value and volume on the export market, boosted by demand in East Asia and Latin America. Exports rose 40% in the year ended June 30 from the previous year, reaching $240.9 million, Agriculture Department officials said. It was the 11th consecutive yearly increase. Japan is the leading importer of U.S. French fries, buying $115.2 million worth between July 1994 and June 1995.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Pierre Beregovoy called a U.S.-European Community deal on farm trade unacceptable Saturday, but he urged angry farmers to remain calm and indicated he is willing to negotiate. France's hard-line stance against the agreement has isolated it from its EC partners, who agreed to the farm subsidy reductions Friday. The 12-member EC fears that the dispute could escalate into a transatlantic trade war that would harm everyone.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | Associated Press
A majority of lawmakers voted early today to oppose a farm trade pact between Washington and the European Community, but a lack of broad support for the government weakened efforts to kill or amend the pact. Socialist Prime Minister Pierre Beregovoy was backed by a 301-251 margin and immediately threatened to veto the accord, which cuts government-subsidized farm exports.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1993
France Insists on Treaty Debate: The government raised the stakes in the negotiations over a GATT world trade pact by insisting its Parliament would have to debate a deal before a Dec. 15 deadline. The European Community refused to comment on the French move but said it sympathized with Paris' concerns that the deal may be held up and then rushed through at the last minute.
NEWS
September 11, 1990
French farm union leaders will be trying to simultaneously control angry militants in their ranks and protect their public image as protests spread against lower-priced, imported livestock. Since June, angry French farmers have hijacked at least 19 trucks carrying British and East European lambs. Last week, they slaughtered 386 live lambs on a truck from Scotland, throwing the carcasses into the yard of a local government office.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
About 3,000 people gathered in Marseilles for a barbecue organized by the city's butchers, who handed out free beef to boost consumer confidence amid growing worries over "mad cow" disease. Public fear about the dangers of eating beef reached panic levels in France this fall when it was discovered that potentially infected meat had made it to supermarket shelves.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
The families of two French victims of a brain-wasting affliction filed a lawsuit Friday accusing French, British and European Union authorities of not acting quickly enough to stamp out "mad cow" disease. The suit, filed with investigating magistrates in Paris' county court, alleges that Laurence Duhamel, who died in February at 36 of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and 19-year-old Arnaud Eboli, who is stricken with the deadly disease, were victims of poisoning and involuntary homicide.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrice Vidieu, who tends 75 goats in a green and tranquil corner of France's countryside, has met the enemy of peasants like himself, and it is the McDonald's hamburger. In recent weeks, the maker of tangy goat cheese from Rocamadour and thousands of other small-scale French farmers have been giving the U.S.-based fast-food giant, symbol and agent of the invasion of Europe by American agribusiness and its techniques, a very rough time.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1996 | WILL PLATT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The town that put mustard on the map is confronting a foreign invasion: Nearly all the seeds that go into the famous spread are imported from Canada. France's top three condiment producers and the Agriculture Ministry have taken to the barricades to resist this assault on culinary patrimony. It is more than faith in the mustard seed that drives these companies.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1995
French Fry Exports Soar: The ever-popular U.S. French fry is growing in value and volume on the export market, boosted by demand in East Asia and Latin America. Exports rose 40% in the year ended June 30 from the previous year, reaching $240.9 million, Agriculture Department officials said. It was the 11th consecutive yearly increase. Japan is the leading importer of U.S. French fries, buying $115.2 million worth between July 1994 and June 1995.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Antoine Lecuyer and John Stegman have no quarrel with one another. Lecuyer, a barrel-gutted, bushy-haired wheat grower from this ancient village southwest of Paris, wants the same things from life as Stegman, his spare and weathered counterpart from the high plains of western Kansas: a decent crop, a fair price, an independent existence and the respect of their countrymen.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A French appeals court upheld a radical farmer's three-month prison sentence for ransacking a McDonald's to protest unchecked globalization. Jose Bove, a 47-year-old sheep farmer, has become a symbol of anti-globalization activists in France and abroad since he led an attack on a McDonald's restaurant under construction in the southern town of Millau in August 1999.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world is in a sorry state. There is not enough Champagne to go around. As a result, the land around this hillside village in the heart of French Champagne country is so valuable for growing grapes that few people can afford a plot to build a new house. Children of the townspeople move away to the wheat- and corn-growing valleys, where the land is 100 times cheaper, to start their families. The Chardonnay grapes grown here fetch more than $2 a pound in the fields.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief American and European Community trade negotiators said Thursday that they had agreed on a formula to resolve a crucial dispute over farm products long viewed as the biggest obstacle to a global trade pact. The agreement appears to be the most encouraging step yet taken toward meeting the Dec. 15 deadline for developing new rules that could lead to a surge in worldwide commerce. At a news conference featuring lavish praise and thinly controlled elation, U.S.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a three-year deep freeze, negotiations to change the rules governing world trade are suddenly showing signs of life two weeks before what is widely considered a final deadline. The French government, which has blocked an agreement on agricultural issues for more than a year, has now raised the possibility of compromise. The chief international referee of the talks stepped up pressure on the United States Tuesday to respond positively, and U.S. officials signaled a willingness to do so.
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