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NEWS
July 11, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High on the wall of Juliette Cerutti's fourth-grade classroom here is a timeline celebrating the glory of France, from the sturdy Gauls to Charlemagne, Joan of Arc to Napoleon. But the French tradition being taught this day was decidedly more pungent. Wrinkling their noses, the boys and girls sampled crusty wedges of Camembert and Brie, chunks of yellow Gruyere and cylinders of goat cheese. Textures, tastes, sounds and smells were discussed amid the giggles.
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NEWS
January 26, 2001 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time the news exposes a public figure as an adulterer someone invariably brings up the French. The French, we say, are more civilized and realistic about affairs. Look at the famous photograph of Prime Minister Francois Mitterand's wife, mistress and illegitimate daughter grieving together in 1996 at his funeral, for instance.
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NEWS
January 26, 2001 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time the news exposes a public figure as an adulterer someone invariably brings up the French. The French, we say, are more civilized and realistic about affairs. Look at the famous photograph of Prime Minister Francois Mitterand's wife, mistress and illegitimate daughter grieving together in 1996 at his funeral, for instance.
NEWS
January 15, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a cold but radiant weekend here, the nicest so far this winter. The boulevards of the Right Bank were mobbed with people enticed by post-New Year's sales. So why did hundreds choose to spend a glorious afternoon indoors, sunk in the same red velvet seats at the Olympia music hall where audiences have listened to the likes of Liza Minnelli and Jacques Brel? The improbable answer is what for Americans is kid stuff: a national spelling championship.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a Gallic version of hell, it surely must be this: to watch as food you love is outlawed or deemed dangerous, and to hear that eating it may lead to sickness and death. Last week, Philippe Bardau, the top-rated chef in this former royal capital on the Loire, took all beef-based dishes off the menu of his 19-table restaurant, which boasts a star in the Michelin guide.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why did Frenchman Gerard d'Aboville row his boat across the Pacific Ocean? After the four-month ordeal--during which he capsized 36 times--D'Aboville claimed that the experience served absolutely no useful purpose and that he hated it from beginning to end. "Everything I did serves nothing. There is nothing that can be learned from it," he said, "But I succeeded." D'Aboville's virtual dismissal of his accomplishment did not dim the glory reflected in the eyes of his fellow Frenchmen, however.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The French have adored the films of Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg and Arnold Schwarzenegger, in the theaters and on television. And, truth be told, they haven't really minded having Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck puttering around Euro Disney on the outskirts of this capital. But enough is enough. In what is rapidly becoming an emotional new front in the U.S.-Europe trade war, France has decided to draw the line at Fred Flintstone, Yogi Bear and Bugs Bunny.
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
In the land of Marcel Proust and Albert Camus and Andre Gide, 40-year-old Paul-Loup Sulitzer, a portly, fast-talking, cigar-smoking millionaire, is hardly anyone's idea of a literary giant. Yet he is probably France's most widely read contemporary novelist. Sulitzer produces, at the pace of about one book a year, what he calls "financial westerns," fast-paced novels in which the good guys make mind-boggling fortunes and whip the bad guys by rendering them bankrupt.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is one of the world's most beloved anarchists, a gentle saboteur of the status quo who is against parking meters, cops, office routine and most other things that pass for the trappings of modern civilization. Like many of us, deep in the most secret recesses of our hidden self, Gaston Lagaffe would rather sleep than work. He dreams grandly of improving society, but his plans, without fail, go awry. "He is a child in an adult world," his "father" once said.
MAGAZINE
February 28, 1993 | JONATHAN KANDELL, Jonathan Kandell, a former Paris-based correspondent for the New York Times, frequently writes on international art and politics
The facade of the elegant Paris townhouse that serves as headquarters for Yves Saint Laurent's fashion empire is decked out with bunting and evergreen wreaths. But inside, Pierre Berge, who runs the business for his designer-partner, is oblivious to the holiday cheer. He is lamenting the decline of French culture over the past 12 years. And he finds enough blemishes to spoil anybody's Christmas mood.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is a Gallic version of hell, it surely must be this: to watch as food you love is outlawed or deemed dangerous, and to hear that eating it may lead to sickness and death. Last week, Philippe Bardau, the top-rated chef in this former royal capital on the Loire, took all beef-based dishes off the menu of his 19-table restaurant, which boasts a star in the Michelin guide.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday, 10 p.m., Place d'Italie. Francis Thomas, a.k.a. "Fanta Boy," is here with his wheels on, ready to roll. All week, the lanky, unmarried immigrant from Cameroon has waited for this moment. It's what he daydreams about while working as a security guard: the wind in his face, the pavement under his feet, the thrill of streaking downhill at 30 mph. "Once you've tasted the Friday night ride, you become impatient for Friday to roll around again," says Thomas, 25. "You can't live without it."
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonald's in France has faced the ire of ransacking peasants and the scorn of a president known for relishing calves' heads more than cheeseburgers. This week, the attacks on the U.S. fast-food giant crossed a threshold when a bombing killed one of its employees. Denis Hennequin, president and CEO of McDonald's France, begged his countrymen Friday to stop thinking of his chain as anything other than restaurants staffed by industrious employees.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Someone in France is again stealing garden gnomes, those cheery and fuzzy-cheeked symbols of smug suburban contentment. In an after-hours raid on a Paris park where 2,000 of the elfin figures had been assembled for an exhibition, members of a group calling itself the Garden Gnome Liberation Front swiped a score of the sculptures last weekend.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of polls and studies has dished up some real dirt on the French: Fewer than half take a bath or shower each day. What's more, 40% of French men, and 25% of women, do not change their underwear daily. Fully 50% of the men, and 30% of women, do not use deodorant. Why is this so, in a nation that has done so much to set modern Western standards for polite behavior? It is not for want of means--almost every French household is equipped with a shower or bathtub.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first half of this century, while industrialization transformed the globe and Europe endured two world wars, Frenchman Pierre Bonnard passed a domestic and productive life in artistic isolation. Working much of the time from his light-filled villa outside Cannes, he painted more than 2,000 works, 384 of them of Marthe, a mistress who became his wife and for decades was his model for intimate nudes.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the biggest victories for the emerging French anti-smoking movement came some years ago when Lucky Luke, a celebrated cowboy comic strip character who could roll his own cigarettes with one hand while riding a horse, gave up the habit. Cigarettes, that is, not horses. Today, he chews on a piece of straw. Earlier this month, Parliament gave anti-smokers another boost by passing a law that bans smoking in public places and will prohibit all forms of cigarette advertising by 1993.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of polls and studies has dished up some real dirt on the French: Fewer than half take a bath or shower each day. What's more, 40% of French men, and 25% of women, do not change their underwear daily. Fully 50% of the men, and 30% of women, do not use deodorant. Why is this so, in a nation that has done so much to set modern Western standards for polite behavior? It is not for want of means--almost every French household is equipped with a shower or bathtub.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The French military, looking for a few good men and women, has begun headhunting on the Internet at http://www.defense.gouv.fr "Our site is going to constitute an essential aid tool for recruitment," army Capt. Pascal Lebraun, who is in charge of the venture, confidently predicted this week. Before the end of 1998, young people who want to join an army, navy and air force in the throes of professionalization will be able to send their resumes via e-mail.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harriet Welty Rochefort, an Iowan married to a Frenchman, once made the colossal blunder of making her father-in-law a sandwich for lunch. He gazed at the bread-encased object as if it were some unknown life form. When told he would have to pick up the thing with his hands to eat it--like a caveman with his kill--the elderly man rebelled. "Well, why don't we just get down on the floor and throw bones over our shoulders while we're at it?" he asked.
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