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BUSINESS
May 24, 2001 | Reuters
DuPont Co., the No. 1 U.S. chemicals producer, warned that demand in some of its key markets, including Europe, has weakened in the second quarter. The disclosure by the company's chief operating officer, Richard Goodmanson, helped to drive DuPont's shares down $1.92, or 4%, to close at $47.39, on the New York Stock Exchange. "For the first time in this downturn, demand in Europe has softened," DuPont said.
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NEWS
June 20, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glamorous French Socialist Party baron Jack Lang once dismissed him as a "loser." But this week, it was Lionel Jospin, not Lang, who lunched with President Clinton at the White House and enjoyed bigwig status in Washington. One year after taking command of France's government after an upset election victory for the Socialist Party, Prime Minister Jospin is still riding high in the polls.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across France, cabbies, truck and ambulance drivers, barge captains, peasants, flower growers and members of other trades and professions joined Thursday in a common cause: an attempt to hold the country and its economy hostage. The spark is the high, and still rising, price of diesel fuel and other petroleum products.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across France, cabbies, truck and ambulance drivers, barge captains, peasants, flower growers and members of other trades and professions joined Thursday in a common cause: an attempt to hold the country and its economy hostage. The spark is the high, and still rising, price of diesel fuel and other petroleum products.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Citizens of eight West European countries, led by Switzerland, earned more than Americans in 1988, according to figures made available by the World Bank on Friday. Switzerland's per-capita income last year was $20,130, while in the United States per capita income was $14,080. The others ahead of the United States: Luxembourg, $19,960; Sweden, $17,160; Iceland, $16,480; West Germany, $15,880; Norway, $15,250; Denmark, $14,530 and France, $14,130.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany, France Cut Interest Rates: The Bundesbank again cut its key money market rate, reducing it to 3.30% from 3.40%, one day after shaving the rate from 3.55%. The Bank of France lowered its intervention rate, the "floor" rate for French short-term rates, to 4.05% from 4.20%. The moves came a day after the U.S. Federal Reserve Board cut its key interest rates for a third time in six months. All mark an effort by central banks worldwide to prevent economies from slipping into recession.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Jacques Chirac, the victim of such a calamitous drop in popularity that he is now distrusted by more than half of the French, went on television Thursday to try to convince his people that he is leading them in the right direction. "We need to modernize, we need to adapt," he said. "If we don't want to understand that France has to adapt to its time, then, it is true--we have no chance to get her running again."
BUSINESS
May 18, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacques Chirac had a promise for everyone as he ran for the French presidency. He vowed he would reduce unemployment, increase wages, lower taxes, encourage entrepreneurs, help society's castoffs, keep the franc strong and cut the national deficit. Now that he has won and taken office, giving conservatives control of the presidency for the first time in 14 years, the question is: Can he deliver?
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any other June, and the little town of Millau, population 21,788, would have nothing more to worry about than the usual traffic jams of sun-seeking vacationers impatiently edging southward on Route Nationale 9. This week, though, the municipality on the Tarn River in southern France is importing 800 police officers and gendarmes. Schools, day-care centers and government offices will close early today.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest instance of employer discontent over France's controversial 35-hour workweek, trucking companies used their rigs to block highways, tunnels and toll plazas at the country's borders Tuesday, immobilizing foreign trucks by the thousands and backing up traffic for miles. Seventy roadblocks were set up near the frontiers with Spain, Italy, Germany, Luxembourg and Switzerland as the protest wore into its second disruptive day.
NEWS
June 20, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glamorous French Socialist Party baron Jack Lang once dismissed him as a "loser." But this week, it was Lionel Jospin, not Lang, who lunched with President Clinton at the White House and enjoyed bigwig status in Washington. One year after taking command of France's government after an upset election victory for the Socialist Party, Prime Minister Jospin is still riding high in the polls.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | CONRAD DE AENLLE, Conrad de Aenlle is a London-based freelance writer
In the last decade, societies throughout the world have forsworn the rigidity of statism for the freedom and opportunity of open markets. And then there's France. The French reconfirmed their love of central authority by electing a Socialist-Communist coalition last month that vowed to raise the minimum wage--already close to $10 an hour, including mandatory benefits--cut the workweek to 35 hours, and to relax the fiscal discipline required for European economic and monetary union.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Jacques Chirac, the victim of such a calamitous drop in popularity that he is now distrusted by more than half of the French, went on television Thursday to try to convince his people that he is leading them in the right direction. "We need to modernize, we need to adapt," he said. "If we don't want to understand that France has to adapt to its time, then, it is true--we have no chance to get her running again."
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although seen more as a brief pause in growth than the onset of recession, an unexpected slowdown in Western Europe's bellwether economies has become the stuff of front-page headlines, heated debate and dire projections. In Germany, the government announced Thursday that the ranks of unemployed had soared past 4 million, the most since World War II. In France, the government announced tax breaks and the central bank slashed interest rates to a 25-year low in a bid to generate jobs.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The French and German governments took drastic action Wednesday to bolster the French franc as global financial markets continued to roil amid growing concern about the ability of major nations to control their economies. Wednesday's developments demonstrated that the calm predicted last weekend when French voters narrowly approved a treaty that would unite Europe's economies has not materialized. They also discouraged hopes that interest rates in Europe will drop--a move that would give the U.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
$55 Billion Spent to Support Franc in July: In its vain bid to defend the franc against heavy selling by dealers, France may have spent nearly 3% of its annual national income in just one day in July, official data shows. Figures released by the Bank of France indicate that its official foreign reserves probably fell by $32 billion (189 billion francs) in the week ended Aug. 5.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany, France Cut Interest Rates: The Bundesbank again cut its key money market rate, reducing it to 3.30% from 3.40%, one day after shaving the rate from 3.55%. The Bank of France lowered its intervention rate, the "floor" rate for French short-term rates, to 4.05% from 4.20%. The moves came a day after the U.S. Federal Reserve Board cut its key interest rates for a third time in six months. All mark an effort by central banks worldwide to prevent economies from slipping into recession.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guy Eiferman's day began long before the cold dawn, at home in the Paris suburbs. Setting out for the office in his car, he passed the station where a commuter train usually zips him to work in less than half an hour. But the station was locked, as it has been for almost two weeks, shut down with nearly every other train in the country by public workers trying to protect such perks as a guaranteed job and retirement at age 50.
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