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NEWS
April 9, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A notorious self-confessed serial killer so coldblooded and cunning that he is nicknamed "The Serpent" flew into Paris on Tuesday, saying he wants to turn over a new leaf and make a movie about himself. After more than 20 years in Indian prisons, Vietnamese-born Charles Sobhraj--intelligent, icily calm and as charmingly successful with women as he was sadistically cruel with many of his victims--arrived at Charles de Gaulle Airport at 6:45 a.m.
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WORLD
November 27, 2007 | Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of rock-throwing youths battled police for a second night Monday in a suburb north of Paris, illustrating the hair-trigger tension in France's poor immigrant neighborhoods. The violence began Sunday in Villiers-le-Bel after two teenagers on a motorbike died in a collision with a police car.
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NEWS
March 15, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
An unusual and dramatic police action, the expulsion of 101 Malians from France in one swoop, has become a disquieting symbol to many French citizens of the highhandedness of government. From time to time, a disturbing case like this enters the imagination of many French and refuses to go away. The case of the Malians, which took place more than five months ago, is the latest example. At 6 p.m. last Oct.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A notorious self-confessed serial killer so coldblooded and cunning that he is nicknamed "The Serpent" flew into Paris on Tuesday, saying he wants to turn over a new leaf and make a movie about himself. After more than 20 years in Indian prisons, Vietnamese-born Charles Sobhraj--intelligent, icily calm and as charmingly successful with women as he was sadistically cruel with many of his victims--arrived at Charles de Gaulle Airport at 6:45 a.m.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roland Bedryj is a French-speaking guide and bus driver who conducts very low-budget tours of Paris for a travel agency in southeast Poland. For about $125 for a five-day tour, the mustachioed, blond Pole with a taste for pungent French black-tobacco cigarettes drives his no-frills, no-video, no-air conditioning, no-bathroom 42-passenger bus from the sugar-beet city of Bielawa to the City of Light. His mostly young tourists sleep in student hostels and eat home-made sandwiches on the bus.
NEWS
May 19, 1988
French ultra-rightist Jean-Marie Le Pen plans to run for a Parliament seat representing Marseille, the racially troubled southern city where he won strong support in his recent anti-immigrant presidential bid. Le Pen's National Front party said he will seek the parliamentary seat of the 8th Marseille district in the June 5 and 12 general elections. Le Pen's decision stirred controversy over the balloting, called Saturday by President Francois Mitterrand, who was reelected May 8.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Danielle Mitterrand, the widow of the former French president, turned out Saturday afternoon. Celebrated figures in France's film industry came. So did throngs of ordinary men and women, including Jacques Cadelec, who wore a boldly lettered sign on his chest: "Immigrants' grandson." "My grandparents came to Paris at the beginning of the century from Brittany, Normandy, Burgundy," said the 60-year-old aerospace engineer, who lives in the capital's suburbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
On a recent morning here, American television star Sandy Duncan pushed a stunt man into the Seine River after whacking him on the head with an umbrella, part of an action sequence for the season opener of her TV sitcom "The Hogan Family." The same spot on the river along the Quai Montebello below Notre Dame Cathedral was reserved a few days later for Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward to stroll hand-in-hand in their new film "Mr. and Mrs.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | Reuters
Bowing to opinion polls and public anger at a rash of violence in immigrant ghettos, France's Socialist government has warned illegal immigrants they will now be forcibly deported. The get-tough move by Prime Minister Edith Cresson, made public Monday, delighted her conservative opponents stunned some left-wing supporters.
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A controversial immigration law took effect in France, but Prime Minister Edouard Balladur, unhappy because key elements have been struck out by the Constitutional Council, is expected to try to toughen it this week. The law seeks to restrict the right of foreigners to enter and reside in France and clamps down on abuse of political asylum, marriages of convenience and family reunification.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Danielle Mitterrand, the widow of the former French president, turned out Saturday afternoon. Celebrated figures in France's film industry came. So did throngs of ordinary men and women, including Jacques Cadelec, who wore a boldly lettered sign on his chest: "Immigrants' grandson." "My grandparents came to Paris at the beginning of the century from Brittany, Normandy, Burgundy," said the 60-year-old aerospace engineer, who lives in the capital's suburbs.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed at the progress of the far-right National Front at the ballot box, and disgusted by immigration legislation they say harks back to the mentality of Vichy France, hundreds of French writers, actors, directors and other cultural figures have launched a civil disobedience campaign and challenged authorities to arrest them. The immediate trigger for the protest is a parliamentary bill that would crack down on illegal immigration.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In a country bitterly torn over how to treat immigrants, Pope John Paul II on Saturday challenged rich nations such as France to embrace the downtrodden. "A society is judged on how it treats those afflicted by life and the attitude adopted toward them," John Paul said in a basilica dedicated to St. Martin, the 4th century soldier-saint celebrated for giving half of his cloak to a freezing beggar.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In a rain of tear gas, French riot police stormed into a Paris church Friday and hauled away 300 illegal African immigrants whose push to stay in France has captivated--and divided--the nation. Helmeted security forces waded through a human wall of sympathizers surrounding the St. Bernard Church in northern Paris. They took hatchets to the church doors and broke through a barricade of chairs and pews.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alfred Nasseri arrived at Charles de Gaulle Airport in 1988, he paused in the lounge to jot a few words in his diary while waiting for the authorities to sort out a small immigration matter. Nasseri is still there, more than six years and 6,000 diary pages later, unable to enter France and unable to leave. He is a man without a country in a Europe that, technically at least, is without borders.
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A controversial immigration law took effect in France, but Prime Minister Edouard Balladur, unhappy because key elements have been struck out by the Constitutional Council, is expected to try to toughen it this week. The law seeks to restrict the right of foreigners to enter and reside in France and clamps down on abuse of political asylum, marriages of convenience and family reunification.
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In a country bitterly torn over how to treat immigrants, Pope John Paul II on Saturday challenged rich nations such as France to embrace the downtrodden. "A society is judged on how it treats those afflicted by life and the attitude adopted toward them," John Paul said in a basilica dedicated to St. Martin, the 4th century soldier-saint celebrated for giving half of his cloak to a freezing beggar.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | From Reuters
France's Constitutional Council on Saturday rejected key provisions of a controversial hard-line law to curb immigration and told the conservative government to rewrite them. The council's ruling, released to the press, censured eight of the law's 52 articles, saying they deprived foreigners of basic rights guaranteed to anyone living on French territory. There was no immediate reaction from the government.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | Associated Press
France's conservative interior minister said in an interview published Tuesday that his country should halt immigration. "Zero immigration is naturally impossible because our economy can require certain categories of foreigners," Charles Pasqua told the newspaper Le Monde. "But that must be the tendency." With its troubled economy, "our country can't continue to be a kind of paradise or oasis in which others want to live," he said.
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