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Frances Lynn Carpenter

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NEWS
July 1, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the soggy mist of the nursery, Frances Lynn Carpenter's newborns lie content and still below a blanket of dusky topsoil. Thousands of jade-colored seedlings sprout from a crib of wet earth, pushing forward delicate leaves like butterfly wings. Carpenter squats to the ground to finger the thin, tender shoot of a freshly germinated tropical tree. She admires its fullness. She pictures it fully grown. She dreams of seeds rising up and saving the world--in a tall way.
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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the soggy mist of the nursery, Frances Lynn Carpenter's newborns lie still, nestled in a blanket of dusky topsoil. Thousands of jade-colored seedlings sprout from a crib of wet earth, pushing forward delicate leaves like butterfly wings. Carpenter squats to finger the tender shoot of a freshly germinated tropical tree. She admires its fullness. She pictures it fully grown. She dreams of seeds rising up and saving the world.
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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the soggy mist of the nursery, Frances Lynn Carpenter's newborns lie still, nestled in a blanket of dusky topsoil. Thousands of jade-colored seedlings sprout from a crib of wet earth, pushing forward delicate leaves like butterfly wings. Carpenter squats to finger the tender shoot of a freshly germinated tropical tree. She admires its fullness. She pictures it fully grown. She dreams of seeds rising up and saving the world.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the soggy mist of the nursery, Frances Lynn Carpenter's newborns lie content and still below a blanket of dusky topsoil. Thousands of jade-colored seedlings sprout from a crib of wet earth, pushing forward delicate leaves like butterfly wings. Carpenter squats to the ground to finger the thin, tender shoot of a freshly germinated tropical tree. She admires its fullness. She pictures it fully grown. She dreams of seeds rising up and saving the world--in a tall way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994
While many in Orange County are contemplating or embarked on conventional summer vacations, or wondering whether they can afford them at all, a group of volunteers for researchers at the University of California is actually paying for the privilege of working hard, planting and monitoring seedlings and studying the soil in Costa Rica.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the price of almost $1,495, volunteers are paying to save the rain forests of Costa Rica. The work is unglamorous, gritty and occasionally so monotonousness that excitement is watching the trees grow. No matter. If you grow them, they will come. The newest summer crop of paying volunteers is reporting for tree-measuring duty today at the Coto Brus farm of UC Irvine ecology professor Frances Lynn Carpenter.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rain came. It hammered the earth and thrashed the trees, tunneled the soil and etched wrinkles in hands. And still the drops kept falling. So wet was the immense emerald rain forest of the southern Costa Rican frontier that sometimes it seemed to an expatriate Southern Californian like Darryl Cole that there was no sun--only rain falling and dusk. In the green darkness of smothering leaves, there was nothing--remembered Cole--more satisfying than taking an ax to free sunlight from the trees.
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