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NEWS
October 4, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm sorry to bother you," a woman writes to Frances Mayes after reading an article Mayes has written about buying her house in Tuscany, "but I don't have anyone to discuss this with. I want to do something but I don't know exactly what." She is referring to a house 3,000 miles away off the Washington state coast that she wants to buy. Mayes envisions a clapboard cottage, a "blue bicycle leaning against a pine tree, morning glories climbing up the porch railing."
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SPORTS
June 13, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Lance Armstrong could be stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and is banned from competing as a triathlete as a result of new doping charges brought against him by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. A 15-page USADA charging letter first obtained by the Washington Post made new allegations against Armstrong, contending the agency collected 2009 and 2010 blood samples from Armstrong identified as "fully consistent with blood manipulation including EPO use and/or blood transfusions.
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NEWS
May 24, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bene! She's back. Frances Mayes, author of the 1996 runaway bestseller "Under the Tuscan Sun," encores with "Bella Tuscany: The Sweet Life in Italy," a memoir chronicling further adventures evolving around restoration of a once-abandoned 200-year-old villa in Cortona, Italy.
OPINION
December 21, 2011
The killing of more than a million Armenians by Ottoman Turks in 1915 was an act of genocide. The Holocaust was a fact. Yet Americans are free to deny the reality of either — or make outlandish assertions of all kinds — without facing punishment by the state. Residents of France will be denied that privilege if its parliament adopts a wrong-headed bill to criminalize denial of the Armenian genocide. On Thursday the lower house of France's parliament will debate a bill that would punish those who deny the genocide with a year in prison and a $58,000 fine.
NEWS
October 10, 2002 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SWAN A Novel By Frances Mayes Broadway Books 324 pages, $25 From the land of happily-ever-after comes "Swan," the first novel from Frances Mayes, travel writer and unofficial poet laureate for all things under the Tuscan sun. Named for a near-perfect Georgia town--that is not all too dissimilar from those villages Mayes has described in her memoirs of Italy--"Swan" opens on the steamy days of summer, the hot "wavy air," "the throbbing of the cicadas" and the moon angling through the pines.
NEWS
February 28, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Tuscany changes you because the people there are so warm," author Frances Mayes was saying in her gentle Georgia accent. "They have this resonance of warmth and, like Southerners, a sense of hospitality so that a guest is not just sitting in a chair at someone's table, but is in a place of honor." Mayes, a San Franciscan who wrote the 1996 bestseller "Under the Tuscan Sun," was in L.A.
BOOKS
May 9, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
SNOW MAN; By Carolyn Chute; (Harcourt Brace: 244 pp., $23) Who'se afraid of Carolyn Chute? I am! I am! Someday I will read her novel, "The Beans of Egypt Maine," but I just don't feel strong enough yet. Chute is known as a son-of-a-bitch writer, a describer of cold climates and colder hearts, a looker in the faces of poverty, incest, anger and unfairness.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | Associated Press
France may release 5,000 to 8,000 inmates in the coming months to ease prison overcrowding, the Justice Ministry announced Monday. The ministry said such a "mass liberation" could not be avoided while the conservative government implements its plans to build new prisons. However, the ministry said there is no specific program for early releases.
TRAVEL
January 9, 2005
In answer to Susan Spano's question in "Life Launched, Lessons Learned" [Dec. 26]: "I wondered how France could ever fail to stand behind the U.S. in such matters as the war in Iraq": Well, moral outrage, perhaps, on the part of the French at the palpable wrongness of our preemptive strike at a nation that was not an imminent threat to the U.S.? Some revulsion regarding our thoughtless rush to war on the part of a nation that knew firsthand the horror of invasion by an occupying force?
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
The cows may be mad, but the French are furious: They may have unknowingly imported vast amounts of animal feed banned in Britain for fear it might carry mad cow disease. The science magazine Nature, citing British government statistics, reported Thursday that Britain sold France thousands of tons of potentially contaminated feed from 1989 to 1991 that it could not sell at home. France reacted angrily to the British weekly's report.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
What Becomes Stories A.L. Kennedy Alfred A. Knopf: 208 pp., $24.95 Nothing shines light on the darkest corners of human existence like icy British irony. A man makes soup for his wife's dinner. He cuts himself and bleeds profusely. She comes home, hates him. He's an idiot. She throws a potted herb (thyme) at him. "Thyme was quite hardy," he thinks, "he thought it would weather the upset and come through fine in the end." Characters here bleed frequently, unaware that they are bleeding.
WORLD
December 21, 2008 | Associated Press
French President Nicolas Sarkozy is expected to sign an arms deal during his upcoming visit to Brazil that could help this country build Latin America's first nuclear-propelled submarine, the government's official news agency said Saturday. The French president is scheduled to arrive in Rio de Janeiro on Monday for a Brazil-European Union summit. He is the current president of the European Union's council.
WORLD
March 26, 2008 | Peter Spiegel and Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writers
France is expected to announce next week that it is nearly doubling its commitment of forces to the international deployment in Afghanistan, sending about 1,000 troops in the most concrete step yet by President Nicolas Sarkozy to support the U.S.-led campaign. The announcement is expected at a North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit in Bucharest, Romania, which will be attended by President Bush.
TRAVEL
February 11, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
WE took the family to Paris for Christmas. It was the first time my husband and I wondered whether the five of us could do such a trip again. It wasn't because of Paris, which was gorgeous and child-friendly, or the fact that we were traveling with 2-month-old Darby. Portable and pleasant, she slept through both plane rides and did not complain about being nursed in the Louvre or on the Pont Neuf.
WORLD
October 22, 2005 | Maggie Farley and Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writers
President Bush called on the U.N. Security Council on Friday to act quickly in response to a report that senior Syrian and Lebanese officials probably plotted the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri. The U.N.
WORLD
June 29, 2005 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
In a bid to harness what backers say could be a nearly limitless source of clean electric power, an international consortium Tuesday chose France as the site for an experimental fusion reactor that will aim to replicate how the sun creates energy. The planned $13-billion project is one of the most prestigious and expensive international scientific efforts ever launched. But critics say the technological hurdles to be overcome are so vast that the money could be better spent in other ways.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1985 | Associated Press
France's industry minister said the Socialist government may sell to investors parts of the companies it nationalized three years ago. Industry Minister Edith Cresson said the six big industrial groups that the Socialists nationalized when they assumed power in 1982 needed capital to finance growth. Last week, the state-owned construction supplies maker, Cie. de Saint-Gobain, said it would sell a 15% interest in its profitable packaging subsidiary, Saint-Gobain Emballage SA.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The French government said it's prepared to cede control of Aerospatiale, France's biggest defense company, in a last-ditch attempt to help the company muscle in on a merger between British Aerospace and DaimlerChrysler Aerospace. The government, which has already agreed to cut its stake in Aerospatiale to 48%, may go further if it's presented with a plan to unite the company with BAe and Dasa, Finance Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn said.
TRAVEL
January 9, 2005
In answer to Susan Spano's question in "Life Launched, Lessons Learned" [Dec. 26]: "I wondered how France could ever fail to stand behind the U.S. in such matters as the war in Iraq": Well, moral outrage, perhaps, on the part of the French at the palpable wrongness of our preemptive strike at a nation that was not an imminent threat to the U.S.? Some revulsion regarding our thoughtless rush to war on the part of a nation that knew firsthand the horror of invasion by an occupying force?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | From Reuters
French schools should show films such as "Schindler's List" or "The Pianist" to combat a dramatic rise in racism and anti-Semitism among students, said France's education minister, Luc Ferry. Novels, documentary films and visits to former Nazi concentration camps also would help invigorate civics classes meant to teach tolerance and understanding, he said this week while presenting a new guide to materials against racial hatred.
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