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Francesca Lia Block

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner
When Francesca Lia Block sat down to write her latest young adult novel, "Love in the Time of Global Warming" (Holt Books for Young Readers: 240 pp., $16.99), she took her beloved hometown of Los Angeles and destroyed it. But she didn't just destroy it. She burned it to the ground in the lyrical, hallucinogenic way in which she once elevated the very same city to celestial heights in her first novel, "Weetzie Bat," and all the adult and young adult fiction she's written since. We meet 17-year old Penelope, the book's protagonist, briefly during the catastrophic environmental event that she calls the "earth shaker," and then in earnest two weeks later, adjusting to a new reality.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Happy birthday, Harry Potter! J.K. Rowling appeared on "Good Morning America" on Tuesday to celebrate the 15th anniversary of her Harry Potter series. Rowling looked back at the series and talked about her favorite characters. Rowling's strongest feelings are about Harry's mentor and teacher, Dumbledore. "I feel like I wrote Dumbledore from the back of my head … he was the character that was hardest to leave for me. He was the person who I'd have come back physically and sit and talk to me. It would be Dumbledore," said Rowling.
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BOOKS
November 12, 1995 | Ron Koertge, Ron Koertge is a novelist living in Los Angeles
Two librarians, tote bags full of publishers' giveaways, meet by the buffet table dominated by an ice sculpture; this year it's a swan, its beak in a book. They nod and rattle the cubes in their gin-and-tonics; then one notices Francesca Lia Block's new novel--"Baby Be-Bop"--tucked in a side pocket of the tote. "Do you like it?" "Frankly, no." "I'm surprised. I love it." They circle warily, then introduce themselves. "I'm Joan." "Beth. What don't you like about it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez's “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” first published in 1967, is a novel set in a bygone era of Colombian history without much technology to speak of. Now the book itself is finally starting to enter the digital age. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” is not yet available as an e-book. But now you can travel to the fictional Macondo in an audio book, from Blackstone Audio. The Ashland, Ore.-based company has acquired the unabridged audio rights to four works by García Márquez: “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” English translation by Gregory Rabassa; “Love in the Time of Cholera,” translated by Edith Grossman; “No One Writes to the Colonel,” translated by J. S. Bernstein; and “Memories of My Melancholy Whores,” also translated by Edith Grossman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Francesca Lia Block's quintessentially Los Angeles spirit animates her fictional worlds, where incongruous things coexist and love bridges the most impossible chasms. Pearls and mosh pits. Fairies and soldiers. "House of Dolls" (HarperCollins: $15.99, ages 9-12) is, appropriately for a story named for a girl's plaything, a miniaturized version of Block's novels. (Note the age level designation, 9-12; although the story is accompanied by Barbara McClintock's drawings, "House of Dolls" is not a picture book for little girls.
BOOKS
September 19, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
"Women have such vivid imaginations," Lolly Willows, a middle-aged British woman, explains to the devil, "and lead such dull lives. Their pleasure in life is so soon over; they are so dependent upon others, and their dependence so soon becomes a nuisance. Do you understand?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez's “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” first published in 1967, is a novel set in a bygone era of Colombian history without much technology to speak of. Now the book itself is finally starting to enter the digital age. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” is not yet available as an e-book. But now you can travel to the fictional Macondo in an audio book, from Blackstone Audio. The Ashland, Ore.-based company has acquired the unabridged audio rights to four works by García Márquez: “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” English translation by Gregory Rabassa; “Love in the Time of Cholera,” translated by Edith Grossman; “No One Writes to the Colonel,” translated by J. S. Bernstein; and “Memories of My Melancholy Whores,” also translated by Edith Grossman.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Happy birthday, Harry Potter! J.K. Rowling appeared on "Good Morning America" on Tuesday to celebrate the 15th anniversary of her Harry Potter series. Rowling looked back at the series and talked about her favorite characters. Rowling's strongest feelings are about Harry's mentor and teacher, Dumbledore. "I feel like I wrote Dumbledore from the back of my head … he was the character that was hardest to leave for me. He was the person who I'd have come back physically and sit and talk to me. It would be Dumbledore," said Rowling.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
Re "Coming of Age on the Printed Page" (Jan 25): I remember going to the local grocery store and sitting at the magazine stand for hours at a time to read Mad magazine and Cracked. It was a form of escape from the dreadful reality society was (and is) amid street gangs. Soon I began to check out library books on a regular basis--simple stories such as "Freckle Juice," to everything from Judy Blume, S.E. Hinton, to Louis L'Amour and countless other stories, magazines and newspapers. As I grew out of that genre, my interests graduated from young adult literature to sociology, history, mythology, philosophy, poetry, religions and classic literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2008 | Denise Hamilton
Francesca Lia Block is a Los Angeles writer with a unique voice that blends lush imagery, hip fairy tales and punk poetic lyricism. She is best known for her "Weetzie Bat" books, which premiered in 1989 and drew critical acclaim and a rapturous fan base while helping to revolutionize young adult literature. Her novels often feature teenage girls navigating the City of Angels while struggling with self-image, friends, boys, family, death and sexuality. Block's latest book, "How to (Un)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner
When Francesca Lia Block sat down to write her latest young adult novel, "Love in the Time of Global Warming" (Holt Books for Young Readers: 240 pp., $16.99), she took her beloved hometown of Los Angeles and destroyed it. But she didn't just destroy it. She burned it to the ground in the lyrical, hallucinogenic way in which she once elevated the very same city to celestial heights in her first novel, "Weetzie Bat," and all the adult and young adult fiction she's written since. We meet 17-year old Penelope, the book's protagonist, briefly during the catastrophic environmental event that she calls the "earth shaker," and then in earnest two weeks later, adjusting to a new reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Francesca Lia Block's quintessentially Los Angeles spirit animates her fictional worlds, where incongruous things coexist and love bridges the most impossible chasms. Pearls and mosh pits. Fairies and soldiers. "House of Dolls" (HarperCollins: $15.99, ages 9-12) is, appropriately for a story named for a girl's plaything, a miniaturized version of Block's novels. (Note the age level designation, 9-12; although the story is accompanied by Barbara McClintock's drawings, "House of Dolls" is not a picture book for little girls.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2008 | Denise Hamilton
Francesca Lia Block is a Los Angeles writer with a unique voice that blends lush imagery, hip fairy tales and punk poetic lyricism. She is best known for her "Weetzie Bat" books, which premiered in 1989 and drew critical acclaim and a rapturous fan base while helping to revolutionize young adult literature. Her novels often feature teenage girls navigating the City of Angels while struggling with self-image, friends, boys, family, death and sexuality. Block's latest book, "How to (Un)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Ruby A Novel Francesca Lia Block and Carmen Staton HarperCollins: 210 pp., $21.95 * IT'S easy to sneer at novels relying on the principle of wish-fulfillment, but is there really anything wrong with stories that end happily ever after? Happy endings abound not only in charming fairy tales like Cinderella, but also in classic novels of all kinds, whether it's Tom Jones winning the lovely Sophia Western or Jane Eyre and Rochester finding true love.
MAGAZINE
December 5, 1999
Thank you so much for the wonderful article on Francesca Lia Block ("The Scribe of Shangri-La," by Debra J. Hotaling, Nov. 14). My friends and I all absolutely adore Block. Her simple, playful, colorful language is so refreshing at this time when everyone's voice seems to sound the same. Some people may lump her books in with the myriad bland "young adult" titles out there, but Block's writing always promises to be anything but dull, no matter what your age. Erin Shawn Mission Viejo
MAGAZINE
November 14, 1999 | DEBRA J. HOTALING, Debra J. Hotaling's last piece for the magazine was a profile of Mattel CEO Jill Barad
( I was lonely ) They face each other from across a card table, Francesca Lia Block and a jury of her protagonist's peers. The girls, all 12 to 15 years old, sit in folding chairs in the back room of the Midnight Special Bookstore in Santa Monica, paperbacks in hand. * Everyone looks shy. * They've come across town on a school night to grill Block, the author of five below-adult-radar literary hits known collectively as the "Weetzie Bat" books.
MAGAZINE
December 5, 1999
Thank you so much for the wonderful article on Francesca Lia Block ("The Scribe of Shangri-La," by Debra J. Hotaling, Nov. 14). My friends and I all absolutely adore Block. Her simple, playful, colorful language is so refreshing at this time when everyone's voice seems to sound the same. Some people may lump her books in with the myriad bland "young adult" titles out there, but Block's writing always promises to be anything but dull, no matter what your age. Erin Shawn Mission Viejo
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Ruby A Novel Francesca Lia Block and Carmen Staton HarperCollins: 210 pp., $21.95 * IT'S easy to sneer at novels relying on the principle of wish-fulfillment, but is there really anything wrong with stories that end happily ever after? Happy endings abound not only in charming fairy tales like Cinderella, but also in classic novels of all kinds, whether it's Tom Jones winning the lovely Sophia Western or Jane Eyre and Rochester finding true love.
BOOKS
September 19, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
"Women have such vivid imaginations," Lolly Willows, a middle-aged British woman, explains to the devil, "and lead such dull lives. Their pleasure in life is so soon over; they are so dependent upon others, and their dependence so soon becomes a nuisance. Do you understand?"
BOOKS
November 12, 1995 | Ron Koertge, Ron Koertge is a novelist living in Los Angeles
Two librarians, tote bags full of publishers' giveaways, meet by the buffet table dominated by an ice sculpture; this year it's a swan, its beak in a book. They nod and rattle the cubes in their gin-and-tonics; then one notices Francesca Lia Block's new novel--"Baby Be-Bop"--tucked in a side pocket of the tote. "Do you like it?" "Frankly, no." "I'm surprised. I love it." They circle warily, then introduce themselves. "I'm Joan." "Beth. What don't you like about it?"
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