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Francois Botha

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SPORTS
December 26, 1998
Mike Tyson says that Francois Botha will suffer the same fate as his previous opponents. Does that suggest that Botha should wear earmuffs when he steps into the ring? ZACHARY A. CHARLES Burbank
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SPORTS
July 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Francois Botha was the lumbering target in front of Lennox Lewis. Mike Tyson, though, was on his mind. Three weeks after Tyson dared to try to ruin Lewis' homecoming, the heavyweight champion took out his frustrations Saturday night on Botha, stopping him in the second round in a performance that thrilled his countrymen.
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SPORTS
July 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
In Lennox Lewis' idea of a perfect world, an arena packed with his adoring countrymen would be watching him defend the undisputed heavyweight title tonight against Francois Botha. Oh, and no one would mention Mike Tyson's name. Unfortunately for Lewis, things aren't so perfect as he takes on Botha in a scheduled 12-round fight that will settle two pieces of the now-fractured heavyweight title. He's no longer the undisputed heavyweight champion, thanks to a court ruling.
SPORTS
July 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
In Lennox Lewis' idea of a perfect world, an arena packed with his adoring countrymen would be watching him defend the undisputed heavyweight title tonight against Francois Botha. Oh, and no one would mention Mike Tyson's name. Unfortunately for Lewis, things aren't so perfect as he takes on Botha in a scheduled 12-round fight that will settle two pieces of the now-fractured heavyweight title. He's no longer the undisputed heavyweight champion, thanks to a court ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1999
At a shopping mall in Westminster, Vietnamese Americans protested in the street and burned Ho Chi Minh in effigy. It seems that a local shop owner had put up a Communist Vietnamese flag and a poster of Ho Chi Minh. The local community found this highly offensive. Nothing like a little symbolism to get the people all riled up. On the other hand, in Las Vegas, heavyweight boxers Francois Botha and Mike Tyson were getting ready for their much publicized bout. At the weigh-in, Tyson was seen sporting quite a collection of tattoos.
SPORTS
January 15, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francois Botha is a man grasping for hope. A 7-1 underdog against Mike Tyson in Saturday's heavyweight match at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Botha knows he is facing a man once feared for his fierceness and now for his instability. So, after being face to face with Tyson at Thursday's weigh-in in the MGM Grand Theatre, Botha stressed his own size advantage. "He's not that big," said Botha, as if he had never met Tyson.
SPORTS
January 15, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Chicago on Wednesday, one Michael retired. In Las Vegas on Saturday, another Michael returns. Michael Jordan departed the Chicago Bulls on top of his game and on top of the world, loved and admired, a role model to the end. Mike Tyson comes back to fight Francois Botha on Saturday night after a 19-month absence from the ring in search of all that Jordan had, his own once-unquestioned spot atop the boxing world now highly suspect, his role never considered a model by society.
SPORTS
July 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Francois Botha was the lumbering target in front of Lennox Lewis. Mike Tyson, though, was on his mind. Three weeks after Tyson dared to try to ruin Lewis' homecoming, the heavyweight champion took out his frustrations Saturday night on Botha, stopping him in the second round in a performance that thrilled his countrymen.
SPORTS
January 17, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE
Once again the boxing world encourages Mike Tyson when he has done nothing to repay it. The NBA has the sense not to charge for its exhibition games in this lockout-ruined season, but the boxing folks have the nerve to ask $46 to watch a glorified trial on pay-per-view television. Some fans even bought it, and about 12,000 people paid ticket prices starting at $200 to see Tyson fight Francois Botha at the MGM Grand Arena Saturday night. No refunds are coming even though Tyson vs.
SPORTS
January 16, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Francois Botha goes to his corner tonight after the first round of his heavyweight fight against Mike Tyson, assuming he is able to get back to his corner, he knows the man who has been his trainer and chief strategist for the last four years won't be there. Charlie "Panama" Lewis will be in a front-row seat, hoping to get through to his fighter by sign language, a note or mental telepathy. That is as close to the ring as Lewis will get.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1999
At a shopping mall in Westminster, Vietnamese Americans protested in the street and burned Ho Chi Minh in effigy. It seems that a local shop owner had put up a Communist Vietnamese flag and a poster of Ho Chi Minh. The local community found this highly offensive. Nothing like a little symbolism to get the people all riled up. On the other hand, in Las Vegas, heavyweight boxers Francois Botha and Mike Tyson were getting ready for their much publicized bout. At the weigh-in, Tyson was seen sporting quite a collection of tattoos.
SPORTS
January 18, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If promoter Bob Arum has his way, Mike Tyson's next opponent would be George Foreman in a fight that would match former two-time heavyweight champions. Before Saturday, that fight might have seemed like a bad joke, a match between the hardest puncher in boxing and a 50-year-old man. But that was before Tyson's poor showing against Francois Botha at the MGM Grand Garden Arena. Now, the joke might be on Tyson.
SPORTS
January 17, 1999 | J.A. ADANDE
Once again the boxing world encourages Mike Tyson when he has done nothing to repay it. The NBA has the sense not to charge for its exhibition games in this lockout-ruined season, but the boxing folks have the nerve to ask $46 to watch a glorified trial on pay-per-view television. Some fans even bought it, and about 12,000 people paid ticket prices starting at $200 to see Tyson fight Francois Botha at the MGM Grand Arena Saturday night. No refunds are coming even though Tyson vs.
SPORTS
January 17, 1999
The round-by-round description by Ed Schuyler Jr. of the Associated Press of Mike Tyson's heavyweight fight with Francois Botha on Saturday night at the MGM Grand: * ROUND 1: Tyson didn't come storming out, as some expected. They met in the center of the ring and exchanged jabs. No serious punches landed in the first 30 seconds, although Tyson missed a big right and left and then a big left hook. They clinched and referee Richard Steele broke them. Almost immediately, they clinched again.
SPORTS
January 16, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Francois Botha goes to his corner tonight after the first round of his heavyweight fight against Mike Tyson, assuming he is able to get back to his corner, he knows the man who has been his trainer and chief strategist for the last four years won't be there. Charlie "Panama" Lewis will be in a front-row seat, hoping to get through to his fighter by sign language, a note or mental telepathy. That is as close to the ring as Lewis will get.
SPORTS
January 15, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Chicago on Wednesday, one Michael retired. In Las Vegas on Saturday, another Michael returns. Michael Jordan departed the Chicago Bulls on top of his game and on top of the world, loved and admired, a role model to the end. Mike Tyson comes back to fight Francois Botha on Saturday night after a 19-month absence from the ring in search of all that Jordan had, his own once-unquestioned spot atop the boxing world now highly suspect, his role never considered a model by society.
SPORTS
January 18, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If promoter Bob Arum has his way, Mike Tyson's next opponent would be George Foreman in a fight that would match former two-time heavyweight champions. Before Saturday, that fight might have seemed like a bad joke, a match between the hardest puncher in boxing and a 50-year-old man. But that was before Tyson's poor showing against Francois Botha at the MGM Grand Garden Arena. Now, the joke might be on Tyson.
SPORTS
January 17, 1999
The round-by-round description by Ed Schuyler Jr. of the Associated Press of Mike Tyson's heavyweight fight with Francois Botha on Saturday night at the MGM Grand: * ROUND 1: Tyson didn't come storming out, as some expected. They met in the center of the ring and exchanged jabs. No serious punches landed in the first 30 seconds, although Tyson missed a big right and left and then a big left hook. They clinched and referee Richard Steele broke them. Almost immediately, they clinched again.
SPORTS
January 15, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francois Botha is a man grasping for hope. A 7-1 underdog against Mike Tyson in Saturday's heavyweight match at the MGM Grand Garden Arena, Botha knows he is facing a man once feared for his fierceness and now for his instability. So, after being face to face with Tyson at Thursday's weigh-in in the MGM Grand Theatre, Botha stressed his own size advantage. "He's not that big," said Botha, as if he had never met Tyson.
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