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Francois Truffaut

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May 5, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Filmmakers are natural raconteurs — they have to be — at least when talking about their films. There are the money men who must be convinced to invest, the studios they need to sign on for distribution, the actors they want to hire and the press and public they hope will see the finished film and like it. The American Film Institute captures all that and more in "Conversations at the American Film Institute with the Great Moviemakers: The...
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Stanley Kauffmann, the longtime film and theater critic of The New Republic who in the 20th century helped define movie reviews as an intellectual form, has died. He was 97. Kauffmann died from complications of pneumonia in New York. A tribute will be held honoring his work but there will be no funeral, per his request, a New Republic spokesman said Wednesday. Over his 54 years at the magazine, Kauffmann assessed innumerable cinematic masterpieces and helped bring a number of seminal directors to light, particularly the New Hollywood filmmakers of the 1970s and European upstart auteurs such as Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
L.A. Times TV critic Robert Lloyd highlights the week's television: "Drunk History" (Comedy Central, Tuesdays) . A great and terrible idea that yields hilarity pretty consistently: Heavily intoxicated narrators (comics, comic actors) retell episodes from history as accurately as they can manage; other comic actors (and assorted ringers), costumed and bewigged, mouth the speaker's words as dialogue in what might be called ahistorical reenactments. Offering actual drunkenness rather than play-drunkenness as something to laugh at feels a little fraught, morally, and, indeed, there will be those for whom the whole enterprise (originally created by Derek Waters, who hosts, for the website Funny or Die)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2009 | Reuters
The bible of France's art-house film world, Cahiers du Cinema, which launched "New Wave" directors such as Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, has been bought by Phaidon Press, the art book publisher said on Monday. Phaidon spokeswoman Liz Thompson said an English version of the magazine was planned in the coming year. The film monthly, founded in 1951 by the critic and theorist Andre Bazin, was famous for promoting the "auteur" theory of filmmaking, which argued that a film should be the product of a director's personal vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francois Truffaut, who died of cancer 10 years ago at age 52, was a charmer. He had an enduring boyishness and a passionate, encyclopedic knowledge of world cinema to which he contributed substantially, beginning with his internationally acclaimed, semi-autobiographical 1959 "400 Blows." Serge Toubiana and Michel Pascal, in their illuminating, engaging "Francois Truffaut: Stolen Portraits" (Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Marie-France Pisier, a French actress who was discovered as a teenager by New Wave filmmaker Francois Truffaut and went on to star in such movies as "Cousin, Cousine" and Truffaut's "Love on the Run," has died. She was 66. Pisier's body was discovered April 24 by her husband, Thierry Funck-Brentano, in the swimming pool of their home in Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer, France, according to the French news agency Agence France-Presse. The cause of death is not known but foul play is not suspected, authorities said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Day for Night," Francois Truffaut's heartfelt homage to the joy and pain of making movies, is just as bracing yet touching as it was when it was first released 25 years ago. If anything, it has gained resonance because we are even further removed from the classic studio production to which Truffaut was bidding farewell--and also because it inevitably reminds us of the loss movie-lovers the world suffered when Truffaut died at 52 in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
L.A. Times TV critic Robert Lloyd highlights the week's television: "Drunk History" (Comedy Central, Tuesdays) . A great and terrible idea that yields hilarity pretty consistently: Heavily intoxicated narrators (comics, comic actors) retell episodes from history as accurately as they can manage; other comic actors (and assorted ringers), costumed and bewigged, mouth the speaker's words as dialogue in what might be called ahistorical reenactments. Offering actual drunkenness rather than play-drunkenness as something to laugh at feels a little fraught, morally, and, indeed, there will be those for whom the whole enterprise (originally created by Derek Waters, who hosts, for the website Funny or Die)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most American moviegoers know the late Francois Truffaut as the charming French scientist in 1977's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," but to serious film fans he was one of the most interesting, complex film directors of all time. "Francois Truffaut: Stolen Portraits" (Fox Lorber), the acclaimed documentary on the French New Wave pioneer, arrives Tuesday in video stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Effortless and effervescent, "Frances Ha" is a small miracle of a movie, honest and funny with an aim that's true. It's both a timeless story of the joys and sorrows of youth and a dead-on portrait of how things are right now for one particular New York woman who, try as she might, can't quite get her life together. That would be the Frances of the title (the Ha isn't explained until the film's charming final frame), a joint creation of and career high point for both star Greta Gerwig and director Noah Baumbach, who met on the director's "Greenberg" and co-wrote the script.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
- It's been 42 years since I first covered the Cannes Film Festival. Arriving on the French Riviera this week, I was struck by how Cannes has remained the quintessential place for film, despite enormous changes in the cinema landscape. Cannes was more casual back in 1971, of course. You could hang out with Italian director Luchino Visconti without much planning or go see Jack Nicholson in his hotel room and spend the afternoon discussing his first directorial effort, "Drive, He Said," with no more preamble than running into a friend of his on the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Maybe it's the hint of Bastille Day in the air, or perhaps it's just an opportunity to use some playful alliteration, but Film Independent at LACMA is going all Gallic on us in July with a series cheerfully titled French Film Fridays. Whatever the reason, it's a pleasure to welcome these screenings to town. The eight rarely seen movies spread over four Fridays are not only a tonic to experience; they also remind us of how strong and wide-ranging the French passion for film has been.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Filmmakers are natural raconteurs — they have to be — at least when talking about their films. There are the money men who must be convinced to invest, the studios they need to sign on for distribution, the actors they want to hire and the press and public they hope will see the finished film and like it. The American Film Institute captures all that and more in "Conversations at the American Film Institute with the Great Moviemakers: The...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2011
MOVIES The New Beverly shines a light on French filmmaker Francois Truffaut's Hitchcock phase with a double feature of his 1968 revenge tale "The Bride Wore Black," starring Jeanne Moreau as a vengeful widow, and his 1969 suspense thriller "Mississippi Mermaid," with Jean-Paul Belmondo and Catherine Deneuve. "Bride" screens in a new 35mm print. New Beverly Cinema, 7165 Beverly Blvd., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Thu. and Fri. $8. (323) 938-4038. http://www.newbevcinema.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Marie-France Pisier, a French actress who was discovered as a teenager by New Wave filmmaker Francois Truffaut and went on to star in such movies as "Cousin, Cousine" and Truffaut's "Love on the Run," has died. She was 66. Pisier's body was discovered April 24 by her husband, Thierry Funck-Brentano, in the swimming pool of their home in Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer, France, according to the French news agency Agence France-Presse. The cause of death is not known but foul play is not suspected, authorities said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"Francois Truffaut," said the French director Claude Miller during a recent visit to Los Angeles, "was there as a friendly ghost watching over us." A year before he died, in 1984 at the tragically young age of 52, Truffaut and Claude de Givray had completed a 35-page treatment of "The Little Thief," about a truant teen-age girl who is for all the world a sister in spirit to Antoine Doinel, the hero of Truffaut's "The 400 Blows." ("Little Thief" opens Friday at the Royal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Effortless and effervescent, "Frances Ha" is a small miracle of a movie, honest and funny with an aim that's true. It's both a timeless story of the joys and sorrows of youth and a dead-on portrait of how things are right now for one particular New York woman who, try as she might, can't quite get her life together. That would be the Frances of the title (the Ha isn't explained until the film's charming final frame), a joint creation of and career high point for both star Greta Gerwig and director Noah Baumbach, who met on the director's "Greenberg" and co-wrote the script.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Eric Rohmer, a former film critic who became one of France's most respected filmmakers and was internationally known for movies such as "My Night at Maud's" and "Claire's Knee," died Monday in Paris. He was 89. Rohmer's death was announced by his producer, Margaret Menegoz. Relatives said he was hospitalized a week ago but offered no further explanation, according to Agence France-Presse. French President Nicolas Sarkozy called the writer-director a "great auteur who will continue to speak to us and inspire us for years to come."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2009 | Reuters
The bible of France's art-house film world, Cahiers du Cinema, which launched "New Wave" directors such as Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, has been bought by Phaidon Press, the art book publisher said on Monday. Phaidon spokeswoman Liz Thompson said an English version of the magazine was planned in the coming year. The film monthly, founded in 1951 by the critic and theorist Andre Bazin, was famous for promoting the "auteur" theory of filmmaking, which argued that a film should be the product of a director's personal vision.
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