Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFrank E Young
IN THE NEWS

Frank E Young

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The manufacturer of Extra-Strength Excedrin capsules Tuesday asked stores nationwide to remove the product from shelves after authorities in Auburn, Wash., found cyanide-laced capsules in the home of a 40-year-old bank manager who died last week of cyanide poisoning. However, Dr. Frank E. Young, commissioner of the federal Food and Drug Administration, said there was thus far "no evidence that this is anything but a local, isolated event."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | KEVIN DAVIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move aimed at restoring the credibility of the embattled Food and Drug Administration, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan said Tuesday that he is forming an advisory panel to conduct a comprehensive one-year review of the agency. Sullivan's announcement came just a week before the departure of FDA Commissioner Frank E.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
One afternoon nearly three years ago, in the midst of a nationwide Tylenol cyanide scare, Dr. Frank E. Young, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, could hardly control his wrath over the idea that someone would tamper with products purchased by American consumers. "This kind of terrorism is just like a burglary," he told a reporter. "In this case, the burglar burglarizes our trust. I get angry that someone would do this to us as citizens."
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outgoing commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration told members of Congress on Friday that the agency has found no evidence so far that generic drugs currently on the market are not safe and effective. But he cautioned: "Our work is not done yet." Dr. Frank E. Young, who will leave his post on Dec. 18, told members of the oversight subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce Committee that "no serious problems with the safety of generic drugs have been found to date."
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Frank E. Young is stepping down as commissioner of the beleaguered Food and Drug Administration, which has been under widespread and increasing fire in recent years from lawmakers, consumer groups, AIDS activists and others. Capitol Hill and agency sources said that Young did not want to leave his job and had been made a scapegoat for agency problems. Young will leave the FDA on Dec.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | KEVIN DAVIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move aimed at restoring the credibility of the embattled Food and Drug Administration, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan said Tuesday that he is forming an advisory panel to conduct a comprehensive one-year review of the agency. Sullivan's announcement came just a week before the departure of FDA Commissioner Frank E.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outgoing commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration told members of Congress on Friday that the agency has found no evidence so far that generic drugs currently on the market are not safe and effective. But he cautioned: "Our work is not done yet." Dr. Frank E. Young, who will leave his post on Dec. 18, told members of the oversight subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce Committee that "no serious problems with the safety of generic drugs have been found to date."
NEWS
March 27, 1989
Federal officials still do not know who injected cyanide into two grapes from Chile, although the origin of the crop has been identified, the head of the Food and Drug Administration said. Commissioner Frank E. Young told reporters on NBC's "Meet the Press" that the FDA's public warning and decision to withhold Chilean fruit from U.S. markets on March 13 was justified because the agency had received two threats about cyanide-laced fruit.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James S. Benson, acting deputy commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, will serve as interim commissioner when the agency's current chief leaves next month, officials in Washington announced. FDA Commissioner Frank E. Young is to leave Dec. 18 to become a deputy assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services. FDA is part of the department.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Frank E. Young is stepping down as commissioner of the beleaguered Food and Drug Administration, which has been under widespread and increasing fire in recent years from lawmakers, consumer groups, AIDS activists and others. Capitol Hill and agency sources said that Young did not want to leave his job and had been made a scapegoat for agency problems. Young will leave the FDA on Dec.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
One afternoon nearly three years ago, in the midst of a nationwide Tylenol cyanide scare, Dr. Frank E. Young, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, could hardly control his wrath over the idea that someone would tamper with products purchased by American consumers. "This kind of terrorism is just like a burglary," he told a reporter. "In this case, the burglar burglarizes our trust. I get angry that someone would do this to us as citizens."
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The manufacturer of Extra-Strength Excedrin capsules Tuesday asked stores nationwide to remove the product from shelves after authorities in Auburn, Wash., found cyanide-laced capsules in the home of a 40-year-old bank manager who died last week of cyanide poisoning. However, Dr. Frank E. Young, commissioner of the federal Food and Drug Administration, said there was thus far "no evidence that this is anything but a local, isolated event."
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The largest and longest study yet on the anti-aging effects of Retin-A confirms that the acne cream does smooth wrinkles, but reducing doses apparently reduces its effectiveness, researchers say. "There is no question that the more you use, the more you improve," said University of Arizona researcher Clayton Owens. "In those people who used the strongest doses, what we saw was a decrease in fine wrinkling, in roughness and in uneven coloring." The University of Michigan found a year ago that Retin-A--a synthetic form of Vitamin A known as tretinoin, long used to treat acne--dramatically reduced the ravages of aging and sun damage in a short-term study of about 30 people.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|