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Frank Guevara

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NEWS
July 2, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Guevara, choreographer on the leading edge of hyperdance who championed the rights of Latinos to forgo stereotyped folk dancing for modern forms, has died at the age of 30. Guevara, born and raised in East Los Angeles, died Sunday of pneumonia at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Asserting that no venue existed for Latino modern and postmodern dancers, he created Dance Theatre of East L.A. in 1992 and served as its producer, artistic director, choreographer and lead dancer.
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NEWS
July 2, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Guevara, choreographer on the leading edge of hyperdance who championed the rights of Latinos to forgo stereotyped folk dancing for modern forms, has died at the age of 30. Guevara, born and raised in East Los Angeles, died Sunday of pneumonia at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Asserting that no venue existed for Latino modern and postmodern dancers, he created Dance Theatre of East L.A. in 1992 and served as its producer, artistic director, choreographer and lead dancer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Frank Guevara obviously learns fast. In its second showcase of the year, his Dance Theatre of East L.A. makes a major bid for legitimacy in a six-part program of mostly new works at the Nosotros Theatre in Hollywood. The program opened Thursday and runs through Sunday. Gone the fake Pre-Columbian folklore and MTV-style muscle-flexing of the group's February performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES
Frank Guevara creates dances of such anguish that it is hard to imagine anyone, even a die-hard bigot, requiring greater suffering from a gay and Latino artist. In three new solos or duets for himself and/or Bogar Martinez, seen Wednesday at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, Guevara showed that he has become a master at turning painful inner states into physical realities. But there were some triumphs, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
For Frank Guevara, there's more to life than Mexican hat dances. The modern dancer-choreographer doesn't believe that all Latinos should have to stick to folk forms. "There're a lot of people who don't accept modern work, who think that ethnic dance is what you should be doing," the East Los Angeles native says over lunch in a small Little Tokyo eatery. "They still see that as being the only dance for Latino people. We're going into 1995, and people still believe that."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES
Frank Guevara creates dances of such anguish that it is hard to imagine anyone, even a die-hard bigot, requiring greater suffering from a gay and Latino artist. In three new solos or duets for himself and/or Bogar Martinez, seen Wednesday at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, Guevara showed that he has become a master at turning painful inner states into physical realities. But there were some triumphs, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994
Regarding "A Look at the Rolodex of Dance," Jan Breslauer's article on the "Dance Kaleidoscope" festival (July 24): Bravo to the efforts of keeping dance in view and its diverse viewpoints. In an already divided dance community, it is important to keep both sides of dialogues open with hopes that one day we can all merge as strong ambassadors that represent all cultural aesthetics of Los Angeles. Since my name was brought up unnecessarily and for self-serving purposes by Frank Guevara, I feel I must respond as a Latino choreographer and artistic director, who has been through the ropes of auditioning for this event seven times and taken only once into the programming, and has served for two years as a panelist for the "Dance Kaleidoscope."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
Frank Guevara serves as producer, artistic director, choreographer and lead dancer for the program by Dance Theatre of East L.A. running at the Nosotros Theatre in Hollywood through Sunday. Guevara's professional background lies solely in the field of commercial dance, and whatever his training or ambitions might be beyond the realm of dance-based TV commercials, music videos, industrial shows and nightclub routines, he keeps relying on tricks of the trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Frank Guevara continued to emerge as an independent Latino choreographer in the four new works introduced by his Dance Theatre of East L.A. on Thursday as part of the "Ecce Lesbo/Ecce Homo" festival at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica. Nothing equaled the new "Hombres" in terms of achieving meaning and expression through pure movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER
Just in time for Mexican Independence Day, the East L.A. Choreographers Showcase offered a reprise of Carola de la Rocha's ambitious pageant, "La Revolucion," in the cozy Playhouse at Cal State Los Angeles. Nearly 30 members of her Los Angeles Mexican Dance Company traced, in dance terms reminiscent of "The Red Detachment of Women," the transition from aristocracy to people's republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
For Frank Guevara, there's more to life than Mexican hat dances. The modern dancer-choreographer doesn't believe that all Latinos should have to stick to folk forms. "There're a lot of people who don't accept modern work, who think that ethnic dance is what you should be doing," the East Los Angeles native says over lunch in a small Little Tokyo eatery. "They still see that as being the only dance for Latino people. We're going into 1995, and people still believe that."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994
Regarding "A Look at the Rolodex of Dance," Jan Breslauer's article on the "Dance Kaleidoscope" festival (July 24): Bravo to the efforts of keeping dance in view and its diverse viewpoints. In an already divided dance community, it is important to keep both sides of dialogues open with hopes that one day we can all merge as strong ambassadors that represent all cultural aesthetics of Los Angeles. Since my name was brought up unnecessarily and for self-serving purposes by Frank Guevara, I feel I must respond as a Latino choreographer and artistic director, who has been through the ropes of auditioning for this event seven times and taken only once into the programming, and has served for two years as a panelist for the "Dance Kaleidoscope."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Frank Guevara obviously learns fast. In its second showcase of the year, his Dance Theatre of East L.A. makes a major bid for legitimacy in a six-part program of mostly new works at the Nosotros Theatre in Hollywood. The program opened Thursday and runs through Sunday. Gone the fake Pre-Columbian folklore and MTV-style muscle-flexing of the group's February performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
Frank Guevara serves as producer, artistic director, choreographer and lead dancer for the program by Dance Theatre of East L.A. running at the Nosotros Theatre in Hollywood through Sunday. Guevara's professional background lies solely in the field of commercial dance, and whatever his training or ambitions might be beyond the realm of dance-based TV commercials, music videos, industrial shows and nightclub routines, he keeps relying on tricks of the trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | JENNIFER FISHER
You don't have to know the mythology and context of a particular ceremony to enjoy it, but sometimes it helps. Joseph Campbell probably never said this, but it was implied when he started explaining myths and rituals to the general public on PBS. And it always comes to mind when dances with ethnic roots are featured, as they were in the last Dance Kaleidoscope '96 program, at the Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1992 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
What can Latino rap, classroom ballet, Mexican folklorico and modern dance have in common? In the case of the third annual East L.A. Choreographers Showcase, seen over the weekend at Barnsdall Gallery Theatre, nothing more than geographical location and community pride. Certainly there was no unifying aesthetic at work here. And, as most grab-bag programs tend to be, this one jarred the viewer from number to number (11 in all) throughout its two hours.
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