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Frank Israel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Franklin D. Israel, a highly respected modern architect known for placing his individual stamp on the innovative Southern California design tradition made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolph Schindler and Frank Gehry, died Monday. He was 50.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | RICHARD KOSHALEK
Frank Israel was beyond category. With his passing, the world loses a man who made an extraordinary contribution to the progress of architecture and a unique tribute to the city and culture in which he lived. Equally important, we lose a marvelously sensitive individual, one who was profoundly and personally committed to the noblest ideas of architecture as revealed throughout history. The human dimension was at the forefront of Frank's design process and his life.
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NEWS
November 3, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
To fashion designer Michelle Lamy, the studio addition to her Hancock Park home looked "boring." Finished in raw gray stucco, the abstract design did not create the dramatic contrast she desired between her conventional white clapboard Colonial home and the modernist geometry of the two-story addition that overlooks the pool. Frank Israel, who designed the addition, agreed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Franklin D. Israel, a highly respected modern architect known for placing his individual stamp on the innovative Southern California design tradition made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolph Schindler and Frank Gehry, died Monday. He was 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I never professed to be an originator," Los Angeles architect Frank Israel told his audience at UC Irvine's Beckman Center on Wednesday night. "I'm more of a stylist." Indeed, as he showed slides of a number of the private homes he designed during the past decade, his "stylist" profile was paramount. Here were lush sweeps of color, sybaritic fountains and pools, amusing details and fanciful furniture designs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1996 | Pilar Viladas, Pilar Viladas is a freelance architecture and design writer and a contributing writer for Architectural Digest
The world of architecture, like those of politics and entertainment, likes to simplify complex issues with sound-bite-length catch phrases. The snappier the label, the better. Frank Israel is, therefore, a trend-spotter's nightmare--difficult to categorize and full of contradictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989
Frank O. Gehry is a great architect. But as one of the Los Angeles contractors who is presently building a Gehry project, I must take exception to the implication that all Los Angeles contractors are limited in their ability ("Frank Gehry 'Always Wanted to Work Big,' " by Leon Whiteson, Dec. 18). How come no one seems to be interested in the viewpoint of the contractor who has to build one of these incredible creations? Believe me, there are two sides to the story. Imperfect and limited are adjectives that fall on both sides of the fence.
MAGAZINE
June 19, 1994
I know I speak for many in the architectural community in saying that we need more articles like "L.A. Architects: They Did It Their Way" (by Joseph Giovannini, Style, May 15). It is vital for the continued health of the profession that L.A.'s contributions and leadership in architecture be recognized throughout the world. JEFFREY DANIELS AIA Los Angeles Those bizarre designs are very appropriate for Los Angeles. They look as though they have already been wrecked by an earthquake.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
Searching for an architecture to express the style of his small but rapidly expanding independent film and TV production company, Propaganda Films president Joni Sighvatsson told designer Frank Israel that "we need to project a young and funky image." Sighvatsson wanted at all costs to avoid what he described as the stuffy corporate look of established movie studios. "Our business is selling images," he said, "and we needed to show in our architecture that we are different from the old-style Hollywood-Burbank operation."
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
Motorists driving on West Washington Boulevard in Venice might not notice the simple brick warehouse buildings on the corner of Hampton Drive, marked only by large black numbers spelling out the address: 901. But this group of industrial sheds is noteworthy because it housed the practice known as the Office of Charles and Ray Eames.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1996 | Pilar Viladas, Pilar Viladas is a freelance architecture and design writer and a contributing writer for Architectural Digest
The world of architecture, like those of politics and entertainment, likes to simplify complex issues with sound-bite-length catch phrases. The snappier the label, the better. Frank Israel is, therefore, a trend-spotter's nightmare--difficult to categorize and full of contradictions.
MAGAZINE
June 19, 1994
I know I speak for many in the architectural community in saying that we need more articles like "L.A. Architects: They Did It Their Way" (by Joseph Giovannini, Style, May 15). It is vital for the continued health of the profession that L.A.'s contributions and leadership in architecture be recognized throughout the world. JEFFREY DANIELS AIA Los Angeles Those bizarre designs are very appropriate for Los Angeles. They look as though they have already been wrecked by an earthquake.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
Motorists driving on West Washington Boulevard in Venice might not notice the simple brick warehouse buildings on the corner of Hampton Drive, marked only by large black numbers spelling out the address: 901. But this group of industrial sheds is noteworthy because it housed the practice known as the Office of Charles and Ray Eames.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I never professed to be an originator," Los Angeles architect Frank Israel told his audience at UC Irvine's Beckman Center on Wednesday night. "I'm more of a stylist." Indeed, as he showed slides of a number of the private homes he designed during the past decade, his "stylist" profile was paramount. Here were lush sweeps of color, sybaritic fountains and pools, amusing details and fanciful furniture designs.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
Searching for an architecture to express the style of his small but rapidly expanding independent film and TV production company, Propaganda Films president Joni Sighvatsson told designer Frank Israel that "we need to project a young and funky image." Sighvatsson wanted at all costs to avoid what he described as the stuffy corporate look of established movie studios. "Our business is selling images," he said, "and we needed to show in our architecture that we are different from the old-style Hollywood-Burbank operation."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989
Frank O. Gehry is a great architect. But as one of the Los Angeles contractors who is presently building a Gehry project, I must take exception to the implication that all Los Angeles contractors are limited in their ability ("Frank Gehry 'Always Wanted to Work Big,' " by Leon Whiteson, Dec. 18). How come no one seems to be interested in the viewpoint of the contractor who has to build one of these incredible creations? Believe me, there are two sides to the story. Imperfect and limited are adjectives that fall on both sides of the fence.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | RICHARD KOSHALEK
Frank Israel was beyond category. With his passing, the world loses a man who made an extraordinary contribution to the progress of architecture and a unique tribute to the city and culture in which he lived. Equally important, we lose a marvelously sensitive individual, one who was profoundly and personally committed to the noblest ideas of architecture as revealed throughout history. The human dimension was at the forefront of Frank's design process and his life.
REAL ESTATE
March 10, 1996
"Cool Dogs, Hot Digs," an exhibit of 40 doghouses remodeled by well-known architects and designers, will be on display Wednesday to April 18 at the Pacific Design Center, 8687 Melrose Ave., West Hollywood. Among the architects and designers participating are Frank Israel, Antoine Predock, Martin Weil, Frederick Fisher, Glenn Texeira, Jarret Hedborg, Jack Lowrance, Tom Buckley, Laddie John Dill, Nancy Goslee Power and Maude and Scott Mac Gillivray.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
To fashion designer Michelle Lamy, the studio addition to her Hancock Park home looked "boring." Finished in raw gray stucco, the abstract design did not create the dramatic contrast she desired between her conventional white clapboard Colonial home and the modernist geometry of the two-story addition that overlooks the pool. Frank Israel, who designed the addition, agreed.
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