Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFrank Langella
IN THE NEWS

Frank Langella

ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1998
Art "Lewis Morley: The Sixties," the first major American exhibition of the British Australian photographer's work, ends at the Gallery Luisotti. Portraits of Christine Keeler, David Frost and Twiggy are included. 2525 Michigan Ave., A-2, Santa Monica. Today-Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. (310) 453-0043. Theater Frank Langella is the obsessed patriarch in August Strindberg's "The Father," which ends at the Geffen Playhouse on Sunday. Today, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 and 8:30 p.m.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Easter Sunday brings the annual lineup of holiday festivities to television. The live broadcast of "Easter Sunrise Service" from the Hollywood Bowl begins on Channel 9 at 5:15 a.m. Pope John Paul II celebrates "Easter in Rome" at 10 a.m. on Channels 4 and 39. This NBC news special chronicles all of the religious observances of this past week at the Vatican, including Easter Mass from St. Peter's Square. Channel 7 will broadcast an Easter celebration of a different kind Sunday at 12:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
There are many reasons to see "Frost/Nixon" including extraordinary performances, but I'll offer just one that stays with me. It's extremely satisfying to watch a film in which nothing is wasted, no moment is trivial, each line spoken leads you to something more. And "Frost/Nixon" is exactly that -- a study in making the large or the small count. Consider the shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012 | By Julie Makinen
The L.A. Times is expanding its events for movie lovers with a new, free Indie Focus Screening Series at the Laemmle NoHo 7 theaters starting Aug. 22 with “Robot & Frank.” Starring Oscar nominee Frank Langella as an aging jewel thief who turns his annoying robot caregiver into an accomplice, “Robot & Frank” was a hit at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Times movie writer Mark Olsen will be on hand to discuss the rambunctiously heartfelt sci-fi caper with director Jake Schreier.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the Cold War is over, expect an ever-increasing lava flow of movies about renegade/free-lance/disgruntled ex- or ex-ex-CIA agents. These folks have to do something to keep active--at least until the next Hot War cools--and, if "Bad Company" is any indicator, that activity involves mucho industrial espionage. This makes sense: Corporate in-fighting has always been blood sport anyway, so why not hire your very own private cadre of crooks to tip the balance?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
When it comes to corporate greed, misguided political policies and the little guy getting the shaft, not much has changed in America over the last century or so. At least that's what the fine documentary "Genius on Hold," via its remarkable account of unsung telecommunications inventor Walter Shaw, so convincingly illustrates. Although writer-director Gregory Marquette gets a bit too ambitious in framing Shaw's ill-fated story within the context of the U.S.' greatest financial crises - the 1929 stock market crash and 2008's Wall Street debacle - the filmmaker mostly focuses, with great detail yet admirable economy, on Shaw's sad, twisty tale of battling telephone giant AT&T.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | By David Ng
The lead actor categories at the Tony Awards saw a pair of upsets, with James Corden of "One Man, Two Guvnors" and Steve Kazee of "Once" taking home the prizes. Corden won for lead actor in a play for the British comedy import "One Man, Two Guvnors," beating out Philip Seymour Hoffman for "Death of a Salesman. " Hoffman had been considered by many industry watchers as the favorite to win for his portrayal of Willy Loman in the revival of the Arthur Miller classic. Critics have praised Corden's comic performance in the play, which is by Richard Bean.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|