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Frank Lorenzo

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BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
Frank Lorenzo's knees won't let him run any more marathons. But the 1980s entrepreneur of deregulated aviation, vilified by labor as a union buster, is determined to show he can run a profitable airline in the 1990s. Lorenzo, 53, is trying to get back into the business after a nearly three-year absence. He's putting together Friendship Airlines, one of several puny carriers that have popped up lately with cut-rate tickets.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
ATX Inc. Declines Offer of New Hearing: Frank Lorenzo's ATX Inc. airline declined the offer of a new hearing before the Department of Transportation on Lorenzo's fitness to run a carrier, accusing the government of prejudice and bias in considering its application. Lorenzo, the former head of Continental and Eastern airlines, is a founder and on the ATX board, which has proposed low-fare service along the East Coast.
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BOOKS
August 19, 1990 | Gregg Easterbrook, Easterbrook is a contributing editor to Newsweek and The Atlantic.
Aaron Bernstein, a labor writer for Business Week magazine, presents a competent, information-packed chronology of the last decade of uniformly deleterious financial jostling over the depressurizing fuselage of Eastern Airlines. If for some reason you're completely fascinated with the sequence in which various doomed takeover proposals for the carrier were tendered, this book will engage you. If you're not, you are likely to find the volume more appropriate for skimming than reading.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1993 | From Associated Press
An administrative law judge recommended Wednesday that the government deny a bid by Frank Lorenzo, deposed head of Eastern and Continental airlines, to operate a new discount-fare air carrier. Judge Richard L. Barton Jr. of the U.S. Department of Transportation said the proposed airline, ATX Inc., has repeatedly defied the judge's orders and has filed "frivolous and vexatious" motions in its license application.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1990 | BRUCE KEPPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the years, Texas Air Corp. Chairman Frank Lorenzo has become an enemy to organized labor. But to his friends and admirers, he's been seen as a nimble-footed deal maker, aviation visionary, steely boss. Even a financial genius.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1989 | From United Press International
The Union of Flight Attendants on Friday called off its five-day strike against Frank Lorenzo's Continental Airlines but refused to admit that the walkout had little impact on the carrier. The union, which claimed 1,200 attendants walked off the job, said it disrupted Continental's flight schedule throughout the job action. But Continental reported only a handful of flight delays and put the number of strikers at about 200 out of 6,500 flight attendants.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Turning up the heat in what has already been a highly personal union-management clash, former Eastern Airlines President Frank Borman on Sunday called the striking machinists union leader Charles E. Bryan a "sick man" who "suffers from delusions and paranoia." The machinists, joined by Eastern pilots, have focused their anger in the weeklong strike on Frank Lorenzo, chairman of Eastern's parent Texas Air Corp. Union leaders have denounced him as a "ruthless corporate raider" and a union buster.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge Threatens Lorenzo Bid: Federal administrative law Judge Robert L. Barton Jr. said he might throw out Frank Lorenzo's application to run a new discount-fare airline because his "unruly" lawyers disobeyed his orders. Barton also said if he had the power he might even fine the attorneys. One of Lorenzo's attorneys said they are being tied up in red tape that is frustrating Lorenzo's effort to provide new low-fare service.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | From Associated Press
Frank Lorenzo's knees won't let him run any more marathons. But the 1980s entrepreneur of deregulated aviation, vilified by labor as a union buster, is determined to show he can run a profitable airline in the 1990s. Lorenzo, 53, is trying to get back into the business after a nearly three-year absence. He's putting together Friendship Airlines, one of several puny carriers that have popped up lately with cut-rate tickets.
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