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Frank Mancuso

BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the new chairman of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Frank G. Mancuso faces more challenges than the average action hero. The veteran executive arrives at MGM at a time when the lion's den is virtually empty. The beleaguered company will release only 13 films this year, about half the studio average. Mancuso must also recruit a new group of senior executives to help carry out his plans. Hollywood sources widely expect him to turn to familiar faces.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | ALAN CITRON
The Frank G. Mancuso era at MGM began early on Monday when a driver came to transport him to the company's headquarters in Santa Monica. This was more than the usual sort of Hollywood indulgence, however. Mancuso had never been there and was afraid of getting lost. The MGM office complex, which borders on an industrial neighborhood, is a far cry from the studio world Mancuso occupied as the former head of Paramount Pictures.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | ALAN CITRON and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The French owner of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer on Sunday announced an ambitious plan for reviving the historic but beleaguered film studio with a new management team and a commitment to more than double the financing for movie and television production. Former Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank G. Mancuso was named to head the studio. He replaces Alan Ladd Jr., who was fired in an angry standoff with Credit Lyonnais, the French bank that owns MGM.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1993 | ALAN CITRON
Decision Expected Soon on New MGM/UA Chief: Rumors that former Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank Mancuso will soon be named to a top executive post at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists heated up again, but sources cautioned that other scenarios are still under discussion. People close to the talks said a decision could be reached as early as today. Credit Lyonnais, the French bank that owns MGM and UA, is said to be considering as many as three separate plans for the studios.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1993 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank G. Mancuso is in negotiations to run a revamped United Artists movie studio, according to knowledgeable sources. Mancuso would be named UA's chairman and would co-manage a combined United Artists/Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer marketing and distribution division under the terms of the deal.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1991 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank Mancuso confirmed on Tuesday that he has reached an out-of-court settlement in his $45-million lawsuit against the entertainment company. Details of the settlement were not disclosed. But people close to the discussions said Mancuso will receive more than $20 million from the studio's parent company, Paramount Communications Inc. The agreement also frees Mancuso to pursue other job opportunities.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1991
Former Paramount Pictures Chief Frank Mancuso is expected today to settle a $45-million lawsuit against his ex-employer. Terms of the out-of-court settlement were unknown, but the deal was said to be the result of weeks of negotiations between the two sides. Representatives of Mancuso and Paramount could not be reached for comment Sunday. Mancuso sued the motion picture studio's parent, Paramount Communications Co.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1991 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank G. Mancuso has filed a lawsuit alleging that Paramount Communications Inc. "abruptly fired" him as head of its movie and television studio despite protective provisions in his written employment agreement. The suit demands more than $45 million in damages.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Frank G. Mancuso abruptly left his position as chairman and chief executive of Paramount Pictures, sending a shock wave through one of Hollywood's biggest film and television studios. The Wednesday departure follows by two days the surprise appointment of film producer Stanley Jaffe as president of Paramount Communications, the studio's New York-based parent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1990 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of "The Godfather Part III," which opens in nearly 2,000 theaters across the country today, Michael Corleone blows his brains out. Scratch that. He dies in a diabetic coma. No wait. He gets shot, then his nephew murders the archbishop . . . . Well, actually, none of the above occurs at the end of Francis Ford Coppola's third entry in the Corleone family saga, but those endings were among many written in the 18 versions of the screenplay during the last two years.
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