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Frank Mccourt

SPORTS
June 13, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
On his first day as an owner of the Dodgers, Magic Johnson had heard one too many questions about Frank McCourt, and what role the outgoing owner would continue to play at Chavez Ravine. "Frank is not here. He is not part of the Dodgers any more ," Johnson said. "We should be clapping for that. " McCourt might not be part of the baseball team any more, but he remains a major player in deciding the future of the land surrounding Dodger Stadium. As  The Times reported  Wednesday night, McCourt could be the sole landlord for an NFL stadium put up on the Dodger Stadium parking lots.
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SPORTS
May 30, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Irony is one of our most overused words, but come on … News has come from back east that the law firm of Dewey & LeBoeuf is filing for bankruptcy. Besides the little detail that this is the largest law firm to go under in U.S. history, there is this one other notable fact: The law firm going bankrupt is the same law firm that handled Frank McCourt's bankruptcy of the Dodgers. In its filing, Dewey lists liabilities “in the range” of $100 million to $500 million; if that's the best estimate it can come up with, it's no wonder these guys got into financial trouble.
SPORTS
November 4, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Frank McCourt, who agreed this week to sell the Dodgers, also has put the Los Angeles Marathon up for sale. McCourt expects the Dodgers to sell for more than $1.2 billion at auction, according to a person familiar with that sale process. The marathon probably would sell for less than $20 million, according two racing industry executives who declined to be identified. McCourt bought the marathon three years ago, revitalizing the race with a course that starts at Dodger Stadium, runs through Hollywood and Beverly Hills and ends in Santa Monica.
SPORTS
November 14, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Frank McCourt apologized to Dodgers fans for the ownership struggle of the last two years and said he was "at peace" with the result of battles in which he took on his ex-wife in divorce court and Commissioner Bud Selig in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. McCourt agreed to sell the Dodgers two weeks ago, signing a document that renders the decision "irrevocable. " In his first public comments since then, he said Monday that he had no regrets about the decision to sell. "It got to a point where it became very, very clear to me that it was the right decision," he said.
SPORTS
April 29, 2011
It looks like Frank McCourt's plan to put an NFL team in Chavez Ravine is right on track. With Tom Schieffer, he now has a receiver. Jim Meser Simi Valley :: Frank McCourt could settle his divorce, sell the Dodgers for an estimated $650 million, pay off his $475 million in debt and conceivably walk away from this soap opera with a cool $90 million plus all the homes he bought with his ex-wile. But no, Frank is going to battle the commissioner, the league and the fans.
SPORTS
June 26, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin
Frank McCourt has added a star trial lawyer to his legal team, ensuring that a nationally prominent attorney will lead each side in the battle for ownership of the Dodgers. Stephen Susman, a Houston-based attorney ranked by several legal publications as one of the premier trial lawyers in the country, is the latest addition to the all-star teams representing McCourt and his estranged wife, Jamie, in divorce proceedings. "It's like having your best athletes take the field," said Loyola Law School professor and legal commentator Laurie Levenson.
SPORTS
February 24, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Each of us, like it or not, finds his own calling in life. Frank McCourt has found his. He parks cars. We all stretch for bigger things. It is human nature. Draftsmen see themselves designing skyscrapers. Five-foot-eight high school basketball players see themselves in the NBA. McCourt saw himself as the owner of the Dodgers. After a while, we saw otherwise. We aren't sure exactly when the Peter Principle set in with McCourt, but the day he got on the plane in Boston and headed west is as good a guess as any. In the sports vernacular of the day, we thought we had put him behind us. He had walked down a dusty street at high noon, and Bud Selig drew first.
SPORTS
December 29, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Are you missing Frank McCourt? OK, it wasn't a serious question. Still, there could be a twisted form of the Stockholm syndrome going on for some. You know, where kidnapping victims start feeling empathetic toward their captors. Our boy Frank, of course, has been mercifully quiet on the public scene since he bankrupted the Dodgers and walked away with a billion dollars after selling the franchise for $2.15 billion. And they say money can't buy happiness. But Frank appears to have reemerged, though not locally.
SPORTS
May 10, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
During a Monday morning radio appearance in New York, Commissioner Bud Selig announced that he had appointed former San Diego Padres President Dick Freeman as an assistant to Dodgers trustee Tom Schieffer. Within hours, Major League Baseball had rescinded the appointment, citing only a "potential conflict. " The conflict: Freeman advised Jamie McCourt last year, during her divorce proceedings against Dodgers owner Frank McCourt, according to a letter sent Tuesday from Robert Sacks, an attorney for Frank McCourt, to Brad Ruskin, an attorney representing MLB. "Unfortunately, this latest episode reinforces the concern that Mr. McCourt is being subjected to discriminatory and unfair treatment," Sacks wrote, "through a process designed to reach a predetermined outcome, without appropriate diligence, independence or care.
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