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Frank O Hara

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July 11, 1999 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP is a frequent contributor to Calendar
New York's Abstract Expressionist movement in the '50s left such a massive imprint on the American consciousness that even today its mythology remains intractable. As a result, the heroic art of the hard-drinking abstractionists is rarely shown alongside the refined realism of figurative artists who were painting during the same years, going to the same parties and sharing friends and lovers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
There's a handmade quality to Maged Zaher's third volume of poetry, “Thank You for the Window Office” (Ugly Duckling: 74 pp., $15 paper), and not just because of the rough-hewn beauty of the book itself. No, the work here - one long, impressionistic poem about … well, really, about everything   - seems piped directly from the inside of the poet's head as he lives and thinks his way through the moment, a moment defined by alienation, humor, politics and the indignities of a corporate culture that cares nothing for the soul.
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NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On this day in 1959, Billie Holiday died in Manhattan's Metropolitan Hospital of heart failure brought on by alcoholism and drug abuse. Only 44, she was ravaged by her addictions, but even in her later years, she could deliver a song like no one else. As Studs Terkel recalls of a performance three years earlier: “Billie's voice was shot, though the gardenia in her hair was as fresh as usual. Ben Webster, for so long a big man on tenor, was backing her. He was having it rough, too. Yet they transcended.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On this day in 1959, Billie Holiday died in Manhattan's Metropolitan Hospital of heart failure brought on by alcoholism and drug abuse. Only 44, she was ravaged by her addictions, but even in her later years, she could deliver a song like no one else. As Studs Terkel recalls of a performance three years earlier: “Billie's voice was shot, though the gardenia in her hair was as fresh as usual. Ben Webster, for so long a big man on tenor, was backing her. He was having it rough, too. Yet they transcended.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
There's a handmade quality to Maged Zaher's third volume of poetry, “Thank You for the Window Office” (Ugly Duckling: 74 pp., $15 paper), and not just because of the rough-hewn beauty of the book itself. No, the work here - one long, impressionistic poem about … well, really, about everything   - seems piped directly from the inside of the poet's head as he lives and thinks his way through the moment, a moment defined by alienation, humor, politics and the indignities of a corporate culture that cares nothing for the soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
For art, eclecticism is a virtue. The capacity to acknowledge the worthwhile coexistence of multiple aesthetic doctrines and artistic points of view--even if they might seem contradictory--keeps systems open and curiosity alive. Eclectic viewpoints are encountered more often in today's internationalized art world than they have been at most times in the 20th century. But there have been exceptions. Frank O'Hara's (1926-1966) was one.
BOOKS
June 27, 1993 | Amy Gerstler, Amy Gerstler is a writer of fiction and poetry whose next book of poems, "Nerve Storm," will be published by Viking Penguin in November
It's not easy to find biographies of writers that describe the life and the writing equally well. "City Poet" provides an intelligent, balanced, readable account of a writer's life and milieu even as it illuminates Frank O'Hara's fabulous, unsung poetry. An accomplished poet and fiction writer himself, living and working in O'Hara's beloved Big Apple, Brad Gooch proves an able choice for this unique poet's biographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
More 'Postman' Praise: The Academy of American Poets has given Miramax Films and its Oscar-nominated movie "The Postman (Il Postino)" a Frank O'Hara Citation recognizing "the tremendous contribution the film and its distributor have made to the appreciation of poetry in America."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2008 | Liesl Bradner
In a bit of poetic justice, it took a hit TV show to boost poetry sales. A book of poems featured prominently in AMC's widely lauded "Mad Men" sent viewers scrambling to find copies of Frank O'Hara's "Meditations in an Emergency" after the second-season premiere July 27. Google reports the book of verse shot to No. 1 on its "Hot Trends" list for that day and is out of stock on Amazon.com.
BOOKS
May 4, 2003 | David Ehrenstein, David Ehrenstein is the author of "Open Secret: Gay Hollywood 1928-2000."
Digressions on Some Poems by Frank O'Hara A Memoir Joe LeSueur Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 306 pp.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
For art, eclecticism is a virtue. The capacity to acknowledge the worthwhile coexistence of multiple aesthetic doctrines and artistic points of view--even if they might seem contradictory--keeps systems open and curiosity alive. Eclectic viewpoints are encountered more often in today's internationalized art world than they have been at most times in the 20th century. But there have been exceptions. Frank O'Hara's (1926-1966) was one.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1999 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP is a frequent contributor to Calendar
New York's Abstract Expressionist movement in the '50s left such a massive imprint on the American consciousness that even today its mythology remains intractable. As a result, the heroic art of the hard-drinking abstractionists is rarely shown alongside the refined realism of figurative artists who were painting during the same years, going to the same parties and sharing friends and lovers.
BOOKS
June 27, 1993 | Amy Gerstler, Amy Gerstler is a writer of fiction and poetry whose next book of poems, "Nerve Storm," will be published by Viking Penguin in November
It's not easy to find biographies of writers that describe the life and the writing equally well. "City Poet" provides an intelligent, balanced, readable account of a writer's life and milieu even as it illuminates Frank O'Hara's fabulous, unsung poetry. An accomplished poet and fiction writer himself, living and working in O'Hara's beloved Big Apple, Brad Gooch proves an able choice for this unique poet's biographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT
Would Diego Rivera and Eleanor Antin have gotten along? Rivera's long-suffering wife, self-proclaimed Mexican Realist painter Frida Kahlo, has become a feminist icon in the United States, while Antin is prominent among the first generation of feminist artists who helped transform American art culture during the past 30 years. Well, probably not.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By August Brown
Thurston Moore's new band Chelsea Light Moving is named after the avant-garde composer Philip Glass' pre-fame moving company, and that's a pretty good metaphor for the band's sound: high-minded musicians doing some dumb, brawny lifting. The band's self-titled debut comes after a gentler acoustic solo album and what appears to be a long hiatus for Sonic Youth (Moore is separating from his wife and band co-founder Kim Gordon). So it makes sense that his next move is this low-stakes, punky project whose album sounds like it was written in an afternoon - in both good and bad ways.
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