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Frank Shorter

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HEALTH
April 11, 2014 | By Roy M. Wallack
When Frank Shorter won the gold medal in the marathon at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, he not only became a household name but also helped create the fitness boom. Pre-Shorter, hardly anyone ran for fitness; post-Shorter, millions did. A Yale grad and trained lawyer who claims to have run 140,000 miles, Shorter's influence grew as he won a silver medal in Montreal in 1976, led the fight to allow runners to turn pro, won a Master's duathlon (bike-run) world championship, became the first head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and established himself as the running world's elder statesman.
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HEALTH
April 11, 2014 | By Roy M. Wallack
When Frank Shorter won the gold medal in the marathon at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, he not only became a household name but also helped create the fitness boom. Pre-Shorter, hardly anyone ran for fitness; post-Shorter, millions did. A Yale grad and trained lawyer who claims to have run 140,000 miles, Shorter's influence grew as he won a silver medal in Montreal in 1976, led the fight to allow runners to turn pro, won a Master's duathlon (bike-run) world championship, became the first head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and established himself as the running world's elder statesman.
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SPORTS
February 29, 1988 | SCOTT OSTLER
Last Halloween, the day he turned 40, Frank Shorter discovered he had been the victim of a monstrous hoax. He woke up, felt fine, went for a run, didn't die. So now Frank Shorter, the only American marathoner since 1908 to win an Olympic gold medal, is unretired, a competitive runner once more. An inspiration to all of us over-40 athletes who haven't yet used up our college eligibility.
SPORTS
March 4, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Shorter was there when it began, so perhaps it was fitting that he was there when it ended. It was 1984. A late August day in the Coliseum. The finish of both the Olympic Marathon and an era. Shorter was in street clothes, in the infield, watching and hoping for an American to carry the flame he had lit a decade earlier. And what a fire that had been. Shorter's victory in the 1972 Olympic Marathon did for marathoning what Madonna did for blondes.
SPORTS
March 7, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
When they cross the finish line these days, it is more often in the glow of nostalgia than the fire of competition. Frank Shorter, No. 72, didn't he single-footedly start the marathoning boom with his 1972 gold medal in Munich? And didn't Bill Rodgers, No. 14, come to stand for those now-fashionable institutions of civic pride, winning the Boston and New York marathons four times each? Of course, that was then, this is now, and stand aside, you legends, for another Mexican.
SPORTS
March 4, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Shorter was there when it began, so perhaps it was fitting that he was there when it ended. It was 1984. A late August day in the Coliseum. The finish of both the Olympic Marathon and an era. Shorter was in street clothes, in the infield, watching and hoping for an American to carry the flame he had lit a decade earlier. And what a fire that had been. Shorter's victory in the 1972 Olympic Marathon did for marathoning what Madonna did for blondes.
SPORTS
September 14, 1985
Frank Shorter, 41, the American whose victory in the 1972 Olympic marathon is credited with sparking the running boom in the United States, entered the New York City Marathon Oct. 27.
SPORTS
May 6, 1985 | GERALD SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Pre lives. Nowhere is the legacy of Steve Prefontaine more acute than in the Pacific Northwest, where in the early 1970s he captured the hearts and minds of his fellow citizens as readily as he did headlines and first-place finishes. In his native Coos Bay, they've built a memorial to him and named streets after him.
SPORTS
March 7, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
When they cross the finish line these days, it is more often in the glow of nostalgia than the fire of competition. Frank Shorter, No. 72, didn't he single-footedly start the marathoning boom with his 1972 gold medal in Munich? And didn't Bill Rodgers, No. 14, come to stand for those now-fashionable institutions of civic pride, winning the Boston and New York marathons four times each? Of course, that was then, this is now, and stand aside, you legends, for another Mexican.
SPORTS
February 29, 1988 | SCOTT OSTLER
Last Halloween, the day he turned 40, Frank Shorter discovered he had been the victim of a monstrous hoax. He woke up, felt fine, went for a run, didn't die. So now Frank Shorter, the only American marathoner since 1908 to win an Olympic gold medal, is unretired, a competitive runner once more. An inspiration to all of us over-40 athletes who haven't yet used up our college eligibility.
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