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Frank Ticheli

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May 22, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As conductor-in-residence at the Pacific Symphony from 1991 to '97, Frank Ticheli wrote five pieces--short and long--for the Santa Ana-based orchestra. But, for various reasons, he never wrote for its regular choral collaborator--John Alexander's Pacific Chorale. Even when Alexander called Ticheli last May to commission a work, it looked like it might not happen. "Initially, I had to decline it," Ticheli said in a recent interview from his Pasadena home. "He wanted it for [this] May.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Miller
When David St. John makes his annual pilgrimage to Moonstone Beach, he looks at the crashing tide and recalls his incarnations from years past. Sometimes, he envisions the child who splashed with wonder in the tide pools, or the teenager who piled in the car with friends for surfing trips. Other times, he sees the middle-aged poet who used the waves as a recurring backdrop. At different phases of his life, the ocean has signified adventure, mortality or hard-earned wisdom; he's sure that other epiphanies will come.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
One of the less predictable outcomes of the Los Angeles riots is that they would inspire a classical composer to write a new piece of music. Pacific Symphony composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli says he "felt the need to compose a dramatic fantasy, powerful in expression, bright and optimistic in nature--a sounding of 'radiant voices' amid the turmoil." The result was his "Radiant Voices," which conductor Carl St.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Rick Schultz
Since its premiere in 1824, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony has been used to celebrate major historical events such as the opening of the United Nations and the fall of the Berlin Wall. But it works just as well for personal ones, including birthdays and anniversaries. Pacific Symphony conductor Carl St.Clair celebrates his 60th birthday this week, and John Alexander marks his 40th anniversary as artistic director of the Pacific Chorale. On Thursday, those  organizations gave a stirring account of the Ninth at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pacific Symphony on Thursday named Frank Ticheli, 33, a newly appointed assistant professor in composition at USC, as the orchestra's composer-in-residence. In announcing the two-year appointment, which begins Oct. 1, music director Carl St. Clair said it is important that the orchestra have someone on staff "who could personify concepts in new music" and provide ideas "from a creator's vantage point, rather than a re-creator's vantage point" like his own.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pacific Symphony will premiere a new work by its composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli and play Joan Tower's "Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman," her response to Copland's famous "Fanfare for the Common Man," during the orchestra's 1992-93 classical season. At a press conference Tuesday morning, music director Carl St. Clair said he is enthusiastic about preparing Ticheli's piece because working with a composer "gets me as close to the creative process as a conductor can be."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Miller
When David St. John makes his annual pilgrimage to Moonstone Beach, he looks at the crashing tide and recalls his incarnations from years past. Sometimes, he envisions the child who splashed with wonder in the tide pools, or the teenager who piled in the car with friends for surfing trips. Other times, he sees the middle-aged poet who used the waves as a recurring backdrop. At different phases of his life, the ocean has signified adventure, mortality or hard-earned wisdom; he's sure that other epiphanies will come.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
Frank Ticheli, named composer-in-residence for the Pacific Symphony last March. Ticheli has been teaching at USC and giving preconcert lectures for the orchestra at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. So far, though, the Pacific has not played any of his music. But that will change, say orchestra officials, who announced at his appointment that he would compose a "substantial" new work for the orchestra's 1992-93 season. But the organization has not yet released details.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two of the Pacific Symphony leader's close friends, music was the way they could best try to comfort Carl St.Clair and his wife, Susan, after the death of their son last month. Composer Frank Ticheli and concert pianist Alain Lefevre went to the St.Clairs' home in Laguna Beach in the days after Cole St.Clair's drowning. They handed the grieving conductor CDs of music they had composed during the previous 18 months, music they both felt could speak to the St.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Patrons of symphony concerts sometimes resent the inclusion on their programs of choral/ symphonic works, one reason being the secondary role the orchestra would seem to play in such works. That putative reading is seldom true, of course. At the opening of the Pacific Symphony's 16th season Wednesday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, two large-scale choral pieces, preceded by an instrumental overture, made up the program. But the orchestra, seated, naturally, center-stage, definitely dominated the aural horizon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two of the Pacific Symphony leader's close friends, music was the way they could best try to comfort Carl St.Clair and his wife, Susan, after the death of their son last month. Composer Frank Ticheli and concert pianist Alain Lefevre went to the St.Clairs' home in Laguna Beach in the days after Cole St.Clair's drowning. They handed the grieving conductor CDs of music they had composed during the previous 18 months, music they both felt could speak to the St.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As conductor-in-residence at the Pacific Symphony from 1991 to '97, Frank Ticheli wrote five pieces--short and long--for the Santa Ana-based orchestra. But, for various reasons, he never wrote for its regular choral collaborator--John Alexander's Pacific Chorale. Even when Alexander called Ticheli last May to commission a work, it looked like it might not happen. "Initially, I had to decline it," Ticheli said in a recent interview from his Pasadena home. "He wanted it for [this] May.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The age-old question in opera is which comes first--the music or the words? In the case of Frank Ticheli's "An American Dream," which receives its premiere today at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, the answer is simple: the words. Actually, the new piece is not an opera. It's subtitled "A Symphony of Songs for Soprano and Orchestra." Still, the principal applies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1998 | Chris Pasles, Chris Pasles is a Times staff writer
Composer Frank Ticheli has written a serious piece about the Los Angeles riots. But he considers his new work, "An American Dream," his first really dark composition. Subtitled "A Symphony of Songs for Soprano and Orchestra," it will receive its first performances on Wednesday and Thursday by the Pacific Symphony led by Carl St.Clair at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The premiere of a symphony by Pacific Symphony composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli and Metropolitan Opera baritone Thomas Hampson's first appearance with the orchestra will highlight its 1997-98 subscription series at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Ticheli's "Symphony No. 1: An American Dream" will be scored for soprano and orchestra and will last about 25 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Patrons of symphony concerts sometimes resent the inclusion on their programs of choral/ symphonic works, one reason being the secondary role the orchestra would seem to play in such works. That putative reading is seldom true, of course. At the opening of the Pacific Symphony's 16th season Wednesday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa, two large-scale choral pieces, preceded by an instrumental overture, made up the program. But the orchestra, seated, naturally, center-stage, definitely dominated the aural horizon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mozart's sublime Mass in C minor was prefaced by two raucous contemporary works Friday on the Pacific Symphony program led by Carl St.Clair at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. * The bizarre programming can be explained, if not robustly defended. St.Clair and the orchestra have been recording two works by composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Rick Schultz
Since its premiere in 1824, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony has been used to celebrate major historical events such as the opening of the United Nations and the fall of the Berlin Wall. But it works just as well for personal ones, including birthdays and anniversaries. Pacific Symphony conductor Carl St.Clair celebrates his 60th birthday this week, and John Alexander marks his 40th anniversary as artistic director of the Pacific Chorale. On Thursday, those  organizations gave a stirring account of the Ninth at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mozart's sublime Mass in C minor was prefaced by two raucous contemporary works Friday on the Pacific Symphony program led by Carl St.Clair at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. * The bizarre programming can be explained, if not robustly defended. St.Clair and the orchestra have been recording two works by composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
One of the less predictable outcomes of the Los Angeles riots is that they would inspire a classical composer to write a new piece of music. Pacific Symphony composer-in-residence Frank Ticheli says he "felt the need to compose a dramatic fantasy, powerful in expression, bright and optimistic in nature--a sounding of 'radiant voices' amid the turmoil." The result was his "Radiant Voices," which conductor Carl St.
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