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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Chris Barton
The action-horror entry "I, Frankenstein" struggled to life on its opening day, allowing "Ride Along" to coast to the top of the rankings. "Ride Along," a comedy starring Ice Cube and Kevin Hart, started its second week by earning an estimated $6.3 million Friday, taking its cumulative total to more than $60 million. The film is expected to hold on to the top spot after claiming the biggest January opening ever last weekend. Further off that pace, "I, Frankenstein" is currently tracking for third place on the box-office chart with just $2.8 million in estimated earnings Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Elizabeth Hand
Marcel Theroux takes identity theft to a new level in "Strange Bodies," a literary science fiction novel as entertaining as it is thought-provoking and disturbing. The author of four previous novels, Theroux was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the U.K.'s Arthur C. Clarke Award for science fiction for his last book, the dystopian western "Far North," demonstrating his skill at reaching mainstream and genre audiences alike. "Strange Bodies" has a marvelously audacious hook - a contemporary reimagining of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein," with one of the titans of English literature standing in for the monster.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Entering the Downtown Independent near Little Tokyo on Thursday for the National Theatre Live's broadcast of director Danny Boyle's stage production of "Frankenstein," I found it impossible to leave behind the unfolding series of catastrophes in Japan that has the world collectively holding its breath. The current crisis follows us everywhere. With the hard-to-fathom images of flattened towns, the protracted suspense over radiation levels and the frustration of not being able to do more than donate to relief organizations, it's no wonder there's a growing hunger for deeper reflection on this multipronged calamity, in which natural disasters have set off an unnatural one. Journalism bombards us with passing information; artists call our attention to enduring truths.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
"I, Frankenstein," the only new wide-release movie in theaters over the weekend, posted less-than-monstrous results that failed to instill any fear in holdovers "Ride Along" and "Lone Survivor. "  The 3D horror-action hybrid, starring a muscular  Aaron Eckhart as Victor Frankenstein's monster, grossed an estimated $8.3 million in ticket sales in the U.S. and Canada, coming in below expectations for a sixth-place finish. Distributed by Lionsgate and produced by Lakeshore Entertainment and Hopscotch Features, the re-imagining of Mary Shelley's 19th-century novel cost about $65 million to make.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before going off the grid for the day.  The Skinny: It was seven years ago today that I quit smoking. While I still occasionally miss my Marlboros, I have no real desire (or the wallet) to pick it up again. Today's roundup includes a preview of the weekend box office. Also, the crowds may have been big at Sundance but the business deals weren't. Oh, and I squeezed in a Justin Bieber piece to bring my demo down. Finally, an obituary for the legendary lawyer and agent Ed Hookstratten, who died Wednesday at the age of 83. Daily Dose: Time Warner Cable is making some changes at its local Los Angeles channel SoCal 101 that will result in more than 50 people being let go. Primarily known as a sports channel for area high schools -- it has a TV deal with the California Interscholastic Federation -- the channel may be trying to veer a little more toward a lifestyle outlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1992 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Harsh winds are stirring up such a thick cloud of snow across this patch of frozen tundra that it's difficult to see the team of huskies pulling the oversized sled in the distance. The dogs yelp with enthusiasm as they race past a snowdrift and circle back toward their starting point. It's a mighty surprising scene for the unprepared observer. The surprise has nothing to do with the fact that this is all taking place just outside London on a warmish autumn day.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Amy Benfer
Those thoroughly satiated with beach days and summer blonds can seek refuge of a darker sort in two new novels for young adults in which classic 19th century Gothic novels get a postmodern, post-punk makeover influenced by the aesthetic of their 20th century pop culture counterpart, Gothic rock. Australian poet and fantasy novelist Alison Croggon starts her novel "Black Spring" with the plot skeleton of Emily Brontë's "Wuthering Heights," then grafts on witches, wizards and a little contemporary feminist theory.
BOOKS
January 19, 1992
For a book and TV special on Boris Karloff, I would welcome any contributions on him, especially on the child actress who played the murdered girl in Frankenstein--Marilyn Harris. MICHAEL POINTON, c/o The Masked Corp, 6-7 Great Chapel St., London W1, United Kingdom
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2003 | From Reuters
John Entwistle's prized pink guitar, "Frankenstein," sold for almost 10 times the expected price at auction, Sotheby's said Tuesday. The pink Fender Precision guitar had been expected to fetch up to $11,300 but sold for $100,400 as part of an auction of Entwistle's collection of 150 guitars, exotic fish, celebrity sketches and gold discs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1987
The Motion Picture and Television Country House in Woodland Hills will receive at least $500,000 in the wake of the death of actress Elsa Lanchester, her attorney said Monday. Lanchester, who became famous as the hissing, reluctant "Bride of Frankenstein," died Dec. 26 at the facility's hospital. She bequeathed the retirement home complex $250,000 directly, said Herschel Green, who represented the actress for 15 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Chris Barton
The action-horror entry "I, Frankenstein" struggled to life on its opening day, allowing "Ride Along" to coast to the top of the rankings. "Ride Along," a comedy starring Ice Cube and Kevin Hart, started its second week by earning an estimated $6.3 million Friday, taking its cumulative total to more than $60 million. The film is expected to hold on to the top spot after claiming the biggest January opening ever last weekend. Further off that pace, "I, Frankenstein" is currently tracking for third place on the box-office chart with just $2.8 million in estimated earnings Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before going off the grid for the day.  The Skinny: It was seven years ago today that I quit smoking. While I still occasionally miss my Marlboros, I have no real desire (or the wallet) to pick it up again. Today's roundup includes a preview of the weekend box office. Also, the crowds may have been big at Sundance but the business deals weren't. Oh, and I squeezed in a Justin Bieber piece to bring my demo down. Finally, an obituary for the legendary lawyer and agent Ed Hookstratten, who died Wednesday at the age of 83. Daily Dose: Time Warner Cable is making some changes at its local Los Angeles channel SoCal 101 that will result in more than 50 people being let go. Primarily known as a sports channel for area high schools -- it has a TV deal with the California Interscholastic Federation -- the channel may be trying to veer a little more toward a lifestyle outlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Amy Benfer
Those thoroughly satiated with beach days and summer blonds can seek refuge of a darker sort in two new novels for young adults in which classic 19th century Gothic novels get a postmodern, post-punk makeover influenced by the aesthetic of their 20th century pop culture counterpart, Gothic rock. Australian poet and fantasy novelist Alison Croggon starts her novel "Black Spring" with the plot skeleton of Emily Brontë's "Wuthering Heights," then grafts on witches, wizards and a little contemporary feminist theory.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Laurence Olivier was among the world's most accomplished actors, but he wasn't a big enough star. That was the consensus of Paramount honchos in 1965, when director John Frankenheimer was planning his eighth feature, the science fiction thriller "Seconds," and wanted the esteemed Brit in the lead role. What might at first have seemed like executive-suite folly led to an inspired instance of counterintuitive casting: Rock Hudson, Hollywood's reigning romantic-comedy dreamboat, in what is unquestionably one of the darkest studio movies ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2012 | By Dale Bailey
When Mary Shelley wrote "Frankenstein" in 1816, she could not have conceived of the cultural landmark it would become. The novel still throws a long shadow across the popular imagination almost two centuries later. Boris Karloff's performance as the monster in Universal's 1931 film has become iconic, and his is merely one among dozens of adaptations and revisions to come: movies, plays, novels, comic books, even breakfast cereals (remember Franken Berry?). Which brings us to Dave Zeltserman's "Monster" (Overlook: 224 pp., $23.95)
SCIENCE
July 10, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An international team of archaeologists have discovered that two mummies found on an island off the coast of Scotland are, like Dr. Frankenstein's monster, composed of body parts from several different humans. The mummified remains, as much as 3,500 years old, suggest that the first residents of the island of South Uist in the Hebrides had some previously unsuspected burial practices. The West Coast of South Uist was densely populated from around 2000 BC until the end of the Viking period around AD 1300.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2001
Words of praise are wanting to describe the power of two June 27 articles. Bill Plaschke's brilliant column "Don of a New Day" (Sports) converges with the front page's "Collegiate Sports Need to Reform, Panel Says." An extraterrestrial visiting any secondary or college campus in the U.S. would conclude that they are athlete factories, just by seeing how much space is devoted to athletic facilities. As a school board member, I dream of capturing 10% of the energy, time and treasure we squander on youth sports for our math and science programs and for the dedicated and resource-poor teachers on the front lines of this monumental struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2010
Even a man who is pure in heart And says his prayers by night may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright -- Curt Siodmak, "The Wolf Man" Screenwriter Curt Siodmak was a German Jew of Polish descent who fled Europe for Hollywood in the 1930s to escape persecution from the Nazis. So there's little wonder that his 1941 Universal horror classic "The Wolf Man" parallels the experiences of Jews in Europe before and during World War II. "The Wolf Man" revolves around an everyman, Lawrence Talbot (Lon Chaney Jr.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Film can be an unstable environment - and not just in the executive suites. Take for example the 1973 Oscar-winning best film "The Sting,"which had chemical stains over several frames in the original negative. Steven Spielberg's landmark 1975 shark thriller "Jaws" showed the ravages of time with nasty tears in the original negative, notably the scene in which Quint (Robert Shaw) arrives at the town meeting on Amity Island. These are some of the challenges facing technicians performing digital restorations of 13 classic movies as part of Universal Studios' 100th birthday celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2011 | Brady MacDonald
The horror movie that is John Murdy's life opens in 1974 on a bloody scene of carnage in his family's Hacienda Heights living room when he's just 7 years old. Eccentric Grandma Rose Kavanaugh convinces the Murdy kids to stage a murder scene to surprise their parents when they return home. The children toss knives on the floor, cover themselves in ketchup and play dead on the carpet. "We all thought it was a great idea," says Murdy, 44, laughing at the recollection like a homicidal maniac.
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