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April 13, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Franklin Simon, president and chief executive officer of Los Angeles' Bullock's Department Stores from 1979 to 1984, has died. He was 64. Simon died April 2 at his Los Angeles home of heart failure, his daughter, Leslie Simon McClure, said. Simon said the key to successful retailing was understanding the area's many lifestyles. "We can't change the customer's self-perception, but we can satisfy his or her needs," he told The Times in 1980.
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NEWS
April 13, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Franklin Simon, president and chief executive officer of Los Angeles' Bullock's Department Stores from 1979 to 1984, has died. He was 64. Simon died April 2 at his Los Angeles home of heart failure, his daughter, Leslie Simon McClure, said. Simon said the key to successful retailing was understanding the area's many lifestyles. "We can't change the customer's self-perception, but we can satisfy his or her needs," he told The Times in 1980.
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NEWS
July 26, 1997
Wilmer Weiss, 71, a former senior vice president for the I. Magnin retail chain. Weiss began his 50-year fashion career in Detroit as a window display assistant. His forte remained fashion presentation and visual merchandising, as he organized fashion shows and designed window and store displays. In addition to his Detroit retailers, Weiss worked for Franklin Simon and A&S in New York City and May Co. in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Lenore Benson, a former executive director of Fashion Group International, a 6,000-member organization that promotes women in fashion and provides educational and networking activities, has died. She was 80. Benson died Sept. 1 at New York Weill Cornell Medical Center of acute pancreatic disease, longtime friend James Watterson told The Times.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1986 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
Associated Dry Goods, parent of the 23 J. W. Robinson department stores in Southern California, on Monday named Tom L. Roach as Robinson's chairman and chief executive to replace Michael Gould, who resigned. Roach, 42, has been chairman and chief executive of Associated's Denver Dry Goods division, known as the Denver--a chain of upscale stores similar to Robinson's--since 1979.
HOME & GARDEN
April 18, 1998 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Collectors have different names for many of their favorite collectibles. "Head vases," "lady head vases" and "figural planters" all refer to the same florist containers that were popular from the 1950s through the '70s. Most of the vases were imported from Europe or Japan and sold to florists and gift shops. Manufacturers called such vases "figural planters."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2011 | By Don Heckman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cornell Dupree, a versatile guitarist whose long, productive career included performances and recordings with such artists as Aretha Franklin, Paul Simon, Miles Davis and Lena Horne, died Sunday at his home in Fort Worth. Dupree, who had emphysema, was 68. Often called "Mr. 2,500" as a reference to the number of recordings he participated in, occasionally as a leader but mostly as a first-call sideman, Dupree adapted easily to the changing demands of soul, R&B, pop, jazz and beyond during his nearly five-decade career.
NEWS
May 16, 1998
Born Dec. 12, 1915, in Hoboken, N.J., to Italian immigrant parents; inherits predilection for bel canto singing style. 1933: Pursues singing career after attending Bing Crosby concert; works locally in clubs and bars. 1935: Wins first prize on "Major Bowes Amateur Hour," resulting in concert and club dates with Major Bowes traveling show, plus occasional radio dates. 1939: Gains widespread attention from New York radio appearance; becomes big-band vocalist with Harry James.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World-class athletes. Visitors from the White House. Computer glitches. Sound familiar? Less than two weeks after the Olympic caravan pulled out of town, competition began Friday--before considerably smaller crowds--for the 1996 Summer Paralympic Games. About 3,500 disabled athletes from 127 countries are competing in the same venues as the Olympians for 10 days in what organizers call the second-largest sporting event in the world.
HOME & GARDEN
January 1, 2000 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The clock and the idea of correct time measured by minutes probably started about 1660 when a Dutch inventor adapted the idea of a pendulum to the clock. Within 100 years, many variations of clocks and clock movements were developed, and most well-to-do households included a clock. Time was no longer determined only by the striking of church bells. The clock movement remained much the same until the 19th century, when the key-wound clock was invented.
NEWS
May 24, 1985
The Trojan Marching Band, 15 strong, will be there right at the beginning. New York's Michael Carney and his band pick up the musical beat a little later. Then comes the dining (food by Rococo), the dancing, the entertainment and loads of hurrahs. And that's the way the USC School of Medicine, founded as the university's second school in 1885 by Dr. Joseph Pomeroy Widney, will celebrate its 100th birthday June 6 in the Central Plaza of the Health Sciences Campus. Centennial Year chairmen Mr.
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