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NEWS
May 15, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Franklyn Seales, a stage actor acclaimed for his forceful versatility in productions that ranged from Shakespeare to the theater of the absurd, died Monday in Brooklyn. Seales, who came to playhouses from John Houseman's Acting Company at Juilliard in the early 1970s, was 37 and died at the family home of the complications of AIDS. A sister, Deborah Richardson, said by telephone from New York that he had been unable to work regularly for the last several months.
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NEWS
May 15, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Franklyn Seales, a stage actor acclaimed for his forceful versatility in productions that ranged from Shakespeare to the theater of the absurd, died Monday in Brooklyn. Seales, who came to playhouses from John Houseman's Acting Company at Juilliard in the early 1970s, was 37 and died at the family home of the complications of AIDS. A sister, Deborah Richardson, said by telephone from New York that he had been unable to work regularly for the last several months.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990
Los Angeles has lost some accomplished and distinctive actors in recent weeks. A memorial service for Hal Bokar and Kim Joseph will be held at the Odyssey Theatre Monday at 9 p.m. And the Mark Taper Forum will be the site of a tribute to the late Franklyn Seales, May 29 at 10:30 a.m. Eulogies also will be heard Wednesday, at a service for Martin Shwartz, veteran Los Angeles Civic Light Opera press agent, at 3 p.m. in the Grand Hall of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Who would have thought that one of the highlights of the theater year would be a radio show? But there it is, on KCRW (89.9 FM) all day today: the L.A. Classic Theatre Works' production of "Babbitt." We had a stage version of Sinclair Lewis' novel at the Mark Taper Forum earlier this season. But the radio production is the whole book, 14 1/2 hours of it, read by an all-star cast headed by the wonderful Ed Asner as George F. ("Homes for Folks") Babbitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By Susan King
Hollywood tackled the 1963 kidnap and killing of Los Angeles police officer Ian James Campbell in the 1979 film "The Onion Field. " But the film ended up playing a role in ensuring that one of the two convicted killers, Gregory Ulas Powell, stayed behind bars until his death Sunday at age 79 . In "The Onion Field," Powell was portrayed by actor James Woods. In 1982, Powell and accomplice Jimmy Lee Smith were scheduled to be paroled, but only Smith got out. Powell's parole was revoked after a public outcry spurred in part by a television broadcast of the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"Who's that strange person under there?" Franklyn Seales wonders that every night when he looks at himself in makeup as the arch, aristocratic peacock Pavel, a former military man consumed with unrequited love in "Nothing Sacred," George C. Walker's funny, poignant adaptation of Turgenev's "Fathers and Sons" now playing at the Mark Taper Forum. "I wanted to give the impression of a sad clown--without making it a clown actually.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
The Onion Field (ABC Monday at 9 p.m.) is the grueling, uneven but engrossing and deeply affecting 1979 film which Joseph Wambaugh adapted from his own nonfiction novel about a notorious, still-controversial cop-killing and its aftermath. James Woods is a thoroughly scary psychopath, and Franklyn Seales' stooge is an even more complex characterization. The picture is not the least of all a grimly convincing expose of a justice system that creates its own victims. John Savage co-stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
What makes a play worth reviving? First, of course, the quality of the play itself. Then the quality of the revival. Eighteen years after the fact, Charles Gordone's Pulitzer Prize-winning "No Place to Be Somebody" at the Matrix proves one thing among many: that for once, the Pulitzer committee (whose track record in this area has been far from illustrious) picked well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
The Los Angeles Actors' Theatre is billing its new show as "William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet,' directed and freely adapted by Charles Marowitz." It would be more accurate to call it "Charles Marowitz's 'Hamlet,' based on materials supplied by William Shakespeare." Marowitz started doing his Shakespearean collages more than 20 years ago. The idea is to shake up the original text, as you might a box of Scrabble letters, and see what new combinations are called forth.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Theater explains itself," says Slawomir Mrozek in the program notes for his new play, "Alpha," at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. "However, certain questions are inevitable. . . ." This suggests a mind not easily pinned down. Robert Goldsby's staging of "Alpha" is, in contrast, very much on the nose. Its hero, a political prisoner (Colm Meaney), is a good man. His inquisitor (Franklyn Seales) is a bad man. With the apparatus of the state behind him, the bad man wins.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Will Stella Adler please report to the Mark Taper Forum? It's an emergency. As Lawrence Christon reminded us in Tuesday's Times, Adler has a way of standing up and demanding that her acting students quit behaving like winsome children and start confronting their characters' baser drives. Life, Adler has been known to say, is not tea at the White House. This is something that the cast of the Mark Taper Forum's new show, "Nothing Sacred," needs to be reminded of.
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