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BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Investors defrauded in a massive 1988 insider trading scheme may be entitled to compensation from $19 million in alleged illegal profit surrendered by one of the defendants, officials said Monday. The Securities and Exchange Commission filed a proposed plan in a New York court for distributing the money allegedly obtained in what at the time was the second-largest insider trading case in U.S. history. In 1988, the SEC accused Fred C. Lee, a Taiwanese national living in Hong Kong, and Stephen K.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 1988 | A Times Staff Writer and
The Securities and Exchange Commission has accused a Taiwanese businessman of violating a U.S. court order by trying to transfer profits from illegal insider trading out of the country. In a court hearing on Tuesday, the SEC asked U.S. District Judge Richard Owen to hold businessman Fred C. Lee, 38, in contempt of court.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors disclosed Tuesday that Fred C. Lee, the Taiwanese businessman implicated in a major insider trading scandal involving the investment firm Morgan Stanley & Co., was named in a 439-count criminal indictment returned a year ago but kept under seal. The indictment was unsealed Tuesday because prosecutors said Lee, a fugitive believed to be living in Taiwan, undoubtedly is aware that he is wanted by U.S. authorities. Assistant U.S. Atty. John M.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The man accused of making millions on insider trading in the United States is said to be a rich Taiwanese socialite divorce with a doctorate degree and a history of stock dabbling. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil complaint Monday accusing Fred C. Lee of making $19 million by trading on tips about impending corporate takeovers given by Stephen Wang Jr., a junior analyst at the Morgan Stanley & Co. brokerage firm.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Securities and Exchange Commission has asked the Swiss government for help in investigating an alleged $19-million insider-trading scheme, the chief of the agency told Congress on Wednesday. SEC Chairman David S. Ruder told the Senate Banking Committee's securities subcommittee that his investigators have learned that a Hong Kong businessman accused in the case, Fred C. Lee, traded U.S. securities from Switzerland.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1988 | Associated Press
A rookie Wall Street analyst who once impressed others as an ambitious go-getter received three years imprisonment Wednesday for his role in the nation's second-largest insider trading fraud. "You truly fall into the situation of a person who bites the hand that feeds him," U.S. District Judge Kevin Duffy said, shaking his head as he sentenced Stephen Wang, 24. "You had a brilliant future and you blew it." Wang, who had held a promising junior analyst job at Morgan Stanley & Co.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Stephen S. Wang Jr., 24, a former junior analyst at the investment banking firm Morgan Stanley & Co., agreed Wednesday to plead guilty to three criminal insider trading charges and to cooperate with a government investigation. Court papers in the case disclosed that Wang had also been involved in another insider trading scheme that predated the one reported in June, when the Securities and Exchange Commission filed civil charges against him and a Taiwanese businessman.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors disclosed Tuesday that Fred C. Lee, the Taiwanese businessman implicated in a major insider trading scandal involving the investment firm Morgan Stanley & Co., was named in a 439-count criminal indictment returned a year ago but kept under seal. The indictment was unsealed Tuesday because prosecutors said Lee, a fugitive believed to be living in Taiwan, undoubtedly is aware that he is wanted by U.S. authorities. Assistant U.S. Atty. John M.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Sui-Kuan Wang Jr. was not exactly high on the totem pole at Morgan Stanley--and, by some accounts, the giant investment banking firm was not particularly high on him, either. The 24-year-old junior analyst in the mergers and acquisitions department was in a program--common among Wall Street firms--in which recent college graduates learn the ropes for two years and then usually leave for graduate business school or another job.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1988 | Associated Press
A rookie Wall Street analyst who once impressed others as an ambitious go-getter received three years imprisonment Wednesday for his role in the nation's second-largest insider trading fraud. "You truly fall into the situation of a person who bites the hand that feeds him," U.S. District Judge Kevin Duffy said, shaking his head as he sentenced Stephen Wang, 24. "You had a brilliant future and you blew it." Wang, who had held a promising junior analyst job at Morgan Stanley & Co.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Stephen S. Wang Jr., 24, a former junior analyst at the investment banking firm Morgan Stanley & Co., agreed Wednesday to plead guilty to three criminal insider trading charges and to cooperate with a government investigation. Court papers in the case disclosed that Wang had also been involved in another insider trading scheme that predated the one reported in June, when the Securities and Exchange Commission filed civil charges against him and a Taiwanese businessman.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1988 | A Times Staff Writer and
The Securities and Exchange Commission has accused a Taiwanese businessman of violating a U.S. court order by trying to transfer profits from illegal insider trading out of the country. In a court hearing on Tuesday, the SEC asked U.S. District Judge Richard Owen to hold businessman Fred C. Lee, 38, in contempt of court.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Investors defrauded in a massive 1988 insider trading scheme may be entitled to compensation from $19 million in alleged illegal profit surrendered by one of the defendants, officials said Monday. The Securities and Exchange Commission filed a proposed plan in a New York court for distributing the money allegedly obtained in what at the time was the second-largest insider trading case in U.S. history. In 1988, the SEC accused Fred C. Lee, a Taiwanese national living in Hong Kong, and Stephen K.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A 24-year-old trainee at Morgan Stanley & Co. was accused Monday of leaking secret details of mergers and other deals in what the Securities and Exchange Commission says is the second-biggest insider trading case ever filed. The SEC suit, brought in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, accuses Stephen Sui-Kuan Wang Jr., the Morgan Stanley employee, and a Taiwanese businessman, Fred C. Lee, of collaborating in a scheme that netted at least $19 million in illegal profits.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The Securities and Exchange Commission has asked the Swiss government for help in investigating an alleged $19-million insider-trading scheme, the chief of the agency told Congress on Wednesday. SEC Chairman David S. Ruder told the Senate Banking Committee's securities subcommittee that his investigators have learned that a Hong Kong businessman accused in the case, Fred C. Lee, traded U.S. securities from Switzerland.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The man accused of making millions on insider trading in the United States is said to be a rich Taiwanese socialite divorce with a doctorate degree and a history of stock dabbling. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil complaint Monday accusing Fred C. Lee of making $19 million by trading on tips about impending corporate takeovers given by Stephen Wang Jr., a junior analyst at the Morgan Stanley & Co. brokerage firm.
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