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Fred C Sands

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December 2, 2000 | JENNIFER OLDHAM and DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern California's No. 1 and No. 2 real estate brokerages announced Friday that they are joining forces, creating a real estate behemoth with 113 offices and 5,700 agents working in communities from Santa Barbara to San Diego. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage and Fred Sands said they have completed the deal and that Sands' operations, except for 40 franchise offices, will move entirely under Coldwell Banker's roof.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it safe? Is it safe? These days in the San Fernando Valley, the question takes on more significance than as a line from the 1970s film "Marathon Man." The earthquake may be history, but the Valley's real estate market continues its wobble. As sellers struggle to secure insurance funds to repair damages and place their homes on the market, wary buyers are looking more closely at just what they might be getting for their money: Are homes here really safe? What damages might lie hidden within?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it safe? Is it safe? These days in the San Fernando Valley, the question takes on more significance than as a line from the 1970s film "Marathon Man." The earthquake may be history, but the Valley's real estate market continues its wobble. As sellers struggle to secure insurance funds to repair damages and place their homes on the market, wary buyers are looking more closely at just what they might be getting for their money: Are homes here really safe? What damages might lie hidden within?
BUSINESS
December 2, 2000 | JENNIFER OLDHAM and DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern California's No. 1 and No. 2 real estate brokerages announced Friday that they are joining forces, creating a real estate behemoth with 113 offices and 5,700 agents working in communities from Santa Barbara to San Diego. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage and Fred Sands said they have completed the deal and that Sands' operations, except for 40 franchise offices, will move entirely under Coldwell Banker's roof.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Sands, the Santa Monica real estate mogul who last year bought KBLA-AM and introduced an all-business news format, has fired half the radio station's staff of 30 and is shutting down most of its local programming this week. Sands bought KDAY-AM early last year for $7.2 million, renamed the former rap station and instituted the business format to fill what he believed was a niche in the market. Sands said he invested another $2 million upgrading technical equipment and hiring a news staff.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1990
Western Host Sacramento Partners, a real estate partnership based in Woodland Hills, said it sold a hotel located in Sacramento and related assets to Fred C. Sands for approximately $3.5 million. The partnership said it would distribute $200,000 of the purchase price to partners and use another $200,000 to pay off sale expenses and reduce debt. The rest of the purchase price is in a promissory note from Sands to Western Host.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1985
I read with interest "Home Sales Likely to Stay Sluggish" (Times Board of Economists, Sept. 3). I don't know where the A. Gary Shilling is getting his impression that homes sales are sluggish, nothing could be further from the truth. According to the National Assn. of Realtors, sales of existing homes nationally have increased an average of 21% a year over the past three years. This is also confirmed by the California Assn. of Realtors data, which shows that existing home sales in California have increased about 22% a year during the same period.
REAL ESTATE
September 25, 1994
I take exception to Robert Bruss' out-of-date and uninformed opinion in the Real Estate Q&A column on Sept. 18 ("Can Agent Make Seller List Home 'As Is'?"). First of all, no broker can make sellers list their properties "as is." Professional agents give sellers informed advice and leave the ultimate decision to the seller. Secondly, it is not a "major mistake" to list "as is" as Bruss contends, nor does it tell prospective buyers to be especially wary. It merely acknowledges the reality of today's litigious environment.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Sands, the Santa Monica real estate mogul who last year bought KBLA-AM and introduced an all-business news format, has fired half the radio station's staff of 30 and is shutting down most of its local programming this week. Sands bought KDAY-AM early last year for $7.2 million, renamed the former rap station and instituted the business format to fill what he believed was a niche in the market. Sands said he invested another $2 million upgrading technical equipment and hiring a news staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2007 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
The long-running tale of the Beverly Hills copycat house has taken another dramatic turn, but more twists might lie ahead. In a retrial on damages, a Los Angeles jury has slashed the $5.9-million verdict against several defendants found to have conspired with an architect's employee to copy the architect's plans for a Bel-Air mansion. The architect plans to appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996 | JON MARKMAN
Way out at the west end of the San Fernando Valley on a recent afternoon, presidential candidate Bob Dole bashed the entertainment industry for its godless, drug-loving, family-thrashing ways. It's a good thing the former senator from corn country didn't stick around for the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Assn. meeting that night. The crowd overflowing the lobby of a Ventura Boulevard bank building would have made sure he knew he wasn't in Kansas anymore.
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