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Fred Coe

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Museum of Television & Radio is ringing down the curtain on its annual William S. Paley Festival on Tuesday evening with a tribute to one of the visionaries of the golden age of television. Fred Coe was an innovative and insightful director and producer who was responsible for producing such acclaimed live TV dramas as Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty," "Peter Pan," starring Mary Martin, J.P.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Tad Mosel, a leading writer of live television dramas in the 1950s who won a Pulitzer Prize for "All the Way Home," his 1960 Broadway dramatization of James Agee's novel "A Death in the Family," has died. He was 86. Mosel, who had cancer and lived in an assisted-living home in Concord, N.H., died Aug. 24, said director Arthur Penn, a longtime friend. During the golden age of live television, Mosel was a major contributor of original scripts for dramatic anthology series such as "Goodyear Television Playhouse," "Studio One" and "Playhouse 90."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2008 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Tad Mosel, a leading writer of live television dramas in the 1950s who won a Pulitzer Prize for "All the Way Home," his 1960 Broadway dramatization of James Agee's novel "A Death in the Family," has died. He was 86. Mosel, who had cancer and lived in an assisted-living home in Concord, N.H., died Aug. 24, said director Arthur Penn, a longtime friend. During the golden age of live television, Mosel was a major contributor of original scripts for dramatic anthology series such as "Goodyear Television Playhouse," "Studio One" and "Playhouse 90."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Museum of Television & Radio is ringing down the curtain on its annual William S. Paley Festival on Tuesday evening with a tribute to one of the visionaries of the golden age of television. Fred Coe was an innovative and insightful director and producer who was responsible for producing such acclaimed live TV dramas as Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty," "Peter Pan," starring Mary Martin, J.P.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1997
Jon Krampner, the author of "The Man in the Shadows: Fred Coe and the Golden Age of Television," will be signing copies of the book Friday at 7 p.m. at Dutton's Brentwood Books, 11975 San Vicente Blvd., Los Angeles. The book is a biography of the late Coe, who produced such classic television works as "Peter Pan," "Marty," "The Days of Wine and Roses" and the "Mr. Peepers" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1985
Former CBS President Frank Stanton, the late producers Walt Disney and Fred Coe and entertainers Steve Allen, Jackie Gleason, Mary Tyler Moore and Burr Tillstrom have been selected for induction into the Television Academy Hall of Fame. They are the third group of seven to be chosen for the honor by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. They will be feted at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium on March 23 in ceremonies that will be taped for broadcast on NBC April 21.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
To those who persist in propagating the notion that television is nothing more than an idiot box: Your attention is called to "The Television Academy Hall of Fame," to be broadcast on NBC at 9 tonight (Channels 4, 36 and 39). Here, in the careers of the seven inductees, is irrefutable evidence that the medium is capable of producing genuinely funny, moving, uplifting, informative, entertaining, enlightening programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1986
Seven well-known television figures have been selected by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for induction into the group's Hall of Fame. The honorees are Johnny Carson, Capt. Jacques Cousteau, Jim Henson, Bob Hope, Ernie Kovacs (posthumously), Eric Sevareid and Leonard Goldenson, chairman of the executive committee of Cap Cities/ABC.
BOOKS
April 20, 1997
Tom Hatten, entertainment reporter: "The Man in the Shadows: Fred Coe and the Golden Days of Television," by Jon Krampner (Rutgers University Press). "This is the first extensive account I've seen about one of the true pioneers of television, the man Krampner rightly calls 'the greatest producer of the early days of New York television.' " **** John Landis, film director: "Inventing Mark Twain," by Andrew Hoffman (Morrow). "I read everything by and about Mark Twain voraciously.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | PATRICK MOTT
We haven't had a true movie iconoclast for some time--one of those guys who delight in telling the world to go to hell out of one side of his mouth while giving it a big smooch with the other. So it's about time to pay another visit to Murray Burns, brought to giddy life by Jason Robards in 1965's "A Thousand Clowns": a human tonic for Angst of all sorts, the scourge of pomposity and convention, friend of the shirker, the hooky-player, the goofball.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1997
Jon Krampner, the author of "The Man in the Shadows: Fred Coe and the Golden Age of Television," will be signing copies of the book Friday at 7 p.m. at Dutton's Brentwood Books, 11975 San Vicente Blvd., Los Angeles. The book is a biography of the late Coe, who produced such classic television works as "Peter Pan," "Marty," "The Days of Wine and Roses" and the "Mr. Peepers" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1996 | CECIL SMITH, Cecil Smith was at various times a television critic, theater critic and television columnist during a 35-year Times career until his retirement in 1981
Director John Frankenheimer was quoted the other day as saying the happiest years of his long and distinguished career were his years with "Playhouse 90" ("Anthology of Memories," Calendar, Oct. 3). May I add that the happiest years I had as a television critic for The Times were the years of "Playhouse 90."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Delbert Mann, who directed the acclaimed live TV production of "Marty," Paddy Chayefsky's classic tale of a lonely Bronx butcher, and then won an Academy Award directing the 1955 movie version, has died. He was 87. Mann, a former president of the Directors Guild of America, died of pneumonia Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his son Fred said Monday.
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