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NEWS
September 17, 1989
The battleship Iowa was being used as a floating laboratory for high-explosive experiments, and crewmen were using improper gun powder when the No. 2 turret exploded and killed 47 men, a news service reported. Media General, a communications company based in Richmond, Va., which publishes the Richmond Times-Dispatch and other papers, reported that transcripts from the Navy investigation into the April 19 battleship explosion showed also that the commander, Capt. Fred B.
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NEWS
December 12, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The skipper of the battleship Iowa on Monday refused to endorse the Navy's official conclusion that Petty Officer Mate Clayton M. Hartwig probably caused the April 19 gun turret blast that killed Hartwig and 46 other sailors. Capt. Fred P. Moosally, in his first public testimony since the devastating blast, said he believed the explosion was a deliberate act of sabotage, but he said that he was not qualified to support the Navy's belief that Hartwig was responsible.
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NEWS
September 9, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
It is a tradition as old as sailing ships and as uncompromising as the sea itself: Skippers are held accountable for what happens on their watch. And, whether they are sleeping in their staterooms or issuing orders on the bridge, everything that happens while they are at sea happens on their watch. The U.S. Navy, its traditions tempered by 20th-Century concepts of justice, has devised gradations of punishment and provided the accused with legal counsel and avenues of appeal.
NEWS
September 17, 1989
The battleship Iowa was being used as a floating laboratory for high-explosive experiments, and crewmen were using improper gun powder when the No. 2 turret exploded and killed 47 men, a news service reported. Media General, a communications company based in Richmond, Va., which publishes the Richmond Times-Dispatch and other papers, reported that transcripts from the Navy investigation into the April 19 battleship explosion showed also that the commander, Capt. Fred B.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The skipper of the battleship Iowa on Monday refused to endorse the Navy's official conclusion that Petty Officer Mate Clayton M. Hartwig probably caused the April 19 gun turret blast that killed Hartwig and 46 other sailors. Capt. Fred P. Moosally, in his first public testimony since the devastating blast, said he believed the explosion was a deliberate act of sabotage, but he said that he was not qualified to support the Navy's belief that Hartwig was responsible.
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | United Press International
The U.S. battleship Iowa, damaged earlier this year by an explosion that killed 47 sailors, will return to the Norfolk Naval Station on Thursday, the Navy announced. The ship, returning from a six-month deployment in the Mediterranean Sea, is to arrive only days before scheduled congressional hearings into the April 19 explosion. A Senate Armed Services subcommittee will take testimony from Capt. Fred P. Moosally, the commanding officer. A House panel also will conduct hearings.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Medals were presented to 13 crewmen of the battleship Iowa for their bravery in rescue work last April after a gun turret exploded, killing 47 sailors. Capt. Fred P. Moosally, who presented the medals aboard the vessel at Norfolk, Va., said the men "saved their ship and allowed us to recover our shipmates in the turret." He praised his crew for quickly extinguishing a raging fire in the turret that could have set off more explosives. Altogether, 43 Iowa personnel have or will receive awards.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | From United Press International
The Navy took punitive disciplinary action Wednesday against two officers of the battleship Iowa for deficiencies found after an explosion that killed 47 men. It also admonished the captain and operations officer. All four, charged with dereliction of duty, went before an admiral's mast, a non-judicial form of inquiry, for lax procedures found during the Navy's investigation into the ship's gun blast April 19.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
Congressional investigators said today that their tests did not support the Navy's finding that sabotage caused the explosion that killed 47 sailors aboard the battleship Iowa. The congressional report, which came a day after the Navy reopened its investigation into the disaster, said the explosion could have resulted from gunpowder bags in the ship's guns being rammed at "higher than normal speeds."
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From United Press International
The battleship Iowa sailed into its home port Thursday, greeted by cheers from friends and relatives of the sailors after the battleship's first major deployment since an April explosion killed 47 crew members. "The big stick is back," said Capt. Fred P. Moosally, the Iowa's commanding officer, referring to the World War II-era dreadnought. The ship and its crew of 1,500, completing an accident-free six-month deployment to the Mediterranean Sea, slid into its berth at the Norfolk Naval Station.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
It is a tradition as old as sailing ships and as uncompromising as the sea itself: Skippers are held accountable for what happens on their watch. And, whether they are sleeping in their staterooms or issuing orders on the bridge, everything that happens while they are at sea happens on their watch. The U.S. Navy, its traditions tempered by 20th-Century concepts of justice, has devised gradations of punishment and provided the accused with legal counsel and avenues of appeal.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The captain of the battleship Iowa said today that he inherited command of a battleship fraught with problems, but that he could not endorse the singling out of a troubled gunner's mate for setting off the explosion that killed 47 crewmen last spring. Capt. Fred P. Moosally also told the Senate Armed Services Committee that allegations of poor training and lack of qualifications leveled against his crew immediately after the explosion April 19 were unwarranted.
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