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Fred Segal

MAGAZINE
October 22, 2000
the stars of that '70s show trade in their bell-bottoms for styles inspired by the me decade. Lisa Robin Kelly: Age 26 Character: Laurie Forman * "I love that cowl-neck sweaters and platform shoes are coming back." Laura Prepon: Age 20 Character: Donna Pinciotti * Missoni silk blouse, $770, at Neiman Marcus, Beverly Hills. Diesel black leather boot-cut jeans, $199, at American Rag Cie, Los Angeles, and Diesel, Beverly Center and Santa Monica.
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NEWS
April 23, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS
Its motto is: "For hands that do more than wave." Its logo depicts founder Alex Volkmann in a skirt, sweater and heels changing a tire on a '58 Cadillac. And you can buy it at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. Heavy Duty hand lotion--$15 for a 3.5-ounce bottle--is the brainchild of Volkmann, former Murad Skin Care executive and Fred Segal makeup artist, and her husband, Fletcher. "I feel like body parts are analogous to car parts. . . . You wash them, buff and wax and shine them.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Shoppers who want to find good stuff and do good deeds at the same time can head to Fred Segal Santa Monica tonight for "An Evening of Gratitude. " The event, which will feature Gratitude Designs by Tara Dixon, will benefit the Flawless Foundation , which creates and supports programs that advocate for better care for children with mental illness and neuro-developmental challenges. Michael and Susan Schofield, the parents of Jani, a child featured in a 2009 story in The Times, will be on hand to talk about their experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2002 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
Let's say you're the 18-year-old son of a head-banging, bat-eating rocker, and you've become the star of a reality show on cable TV. Your lifestyle is a seamless melding of luxury and profanity. Where, exactly, would you go to find a $385 plush terry bathrobe with a two-word obscenity embroidered on the sleeve? Chrome Hearts, naturally, a business that shuns publicity the way some of its famous customers crave it.
HOME & GARDEN
July 25, 2009 | David A. Keeps
For the glass-is-half-full optimists at Trash for Teaching, an empty plastic water bottle doesn't have to be tossed into the blue recycling bin. Instead, it can be turned into a vase -- and a lesson in repurposing. The Los Angeles-based nonprofit collects castoff materials from manufacturing operations for use in local school arts and crafts programs. It found that standard water bottles fit neatly inside cardboard spools discarded from fabric knitting mills.
MAGAZINE
September 8, 1991
When it comes to men's grooming, the news is shorter, more versatile hair. Which means that a haircut should give a man the choice of several styles--combed back, parted or falling forward. "No more hard hair," says Cheryl Marks, the bicoastal hair and makeup artist who groomed the models for these photos. "Men now should use oils and creams, not gels," she says. "And when getting a haircut, make sure that the style is not a wedge but tapered so that you can see the contour of the head."
HOME & GARDEN
November 8, 2007 | David A. Keeps
WHO says the holiday table has to be traditional? This season, stores are rolling out new tabletop pieces that look distinctive enough for a special occasion but are still versatile enough to set out long after New Year's has passed. Sparkling metals, exotic animal prints and colorful ethnic accents are trends that have filtered all the way down to discount stores.
MAGAZINE
October 21, 1990 | MARK EHRMAN
PRESS your hand on a 1st Degree Sportswear T-shirt and watch the magic happen. The West Los Angeles-based firm has added a new twist to the humble T-shirt: color-changing ink. Many of the designs react, in mood-ring fashion, to fluctuating body or external temperatures by changing colors. The 100% cotton T-shirts run about $28; the sweat shirts, $43. 1st Degree T-shirts: Fred Segal, 8100 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles, (213) 651-4129; and Flora Luna, 1220 Bison Ave.
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