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Fred Starrh

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NEWS
May 5, 1991
For 40 years, farmer Fred Starrh toiled in anonymity, raising cotton, alfalfa and almonds on his remote ranch in western Kern County. But then came February, when the state shut off deliveries of water to agriculture. Suddenly, Starrh was in the spotlight, besieged by reporters moved by his predicament and impressed by his knowledge, sincerity and no-nonsense style.
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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catchy quotes and snappy sound bites can be hard to find, but they seem to tumble right out of Fred Starrh. Perhaps that explains why Starrh, an ordinary Kern County cotton grower for most of his adult life, has suddenly become America's Farmer, the virtual embodiment of agriculture's suffering in the fifth year of the California drought. Maybe you've heard of this man. These days, he's hard to miss.
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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Catchy quotes and snappy sound bites can be hard to find, but they seem to tumble right out of Fred Starrh. Perhaps that explains why Starrh, an ordinary Kern County cotton grower for most of his adult life, has suddenly become America's Farmer, the virtual embodiment of agriculture's suffering in the fifth year of the California drought. Maybe you've heard of this man. These days, he's hard to miss.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
For 40 years, farmer Fred Starrh toiled in anonymity, raising cotton, alfalfa and almonds on his remote ranch in western Kern County. But then came February, when the state shut off deliveries of water to agriculture. Suddenly, Starrh was in the spotlight, besieged by reporters moved by his predicament and impressed by his knowledge, sincerity and no-nonsense style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER
It shouldn't be surprising to anyone who regularly tunes in to KCET's "Life & Times" that, of the show's three co-hosts--Latino poet-journalist-liberal Ruben Martinez, conservative activist Hugh Hewitt and sort-of-liberal reporter for The Times Patt Morrison--it's Morrison who ventures around California to offer a "State of the State" report.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS
To monitor business's pulse on politics, The Times will present California executives' and business owners' opinions about the presidential election. This is one in a series of snapshots. Name: Fred Starrh Company: Starrh & Starrh Cotton Growers, Shafter, Calif. Position: President Registration: Republican Q. For whom are you going to vote? A. I'm going to vote for Bush. Q. Why? A.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
A monthly look at the water shortage With the wet season two-thirds finished, the amount of snow and rain on California's mountains continued to fall far short of normal. Statewide, precipitation is less than 1/4 of normal and is the lowest on record for this time of year, having dropped below that of the record-setting drought of 1977. The Sacramento River Basin, a main source of water for Southern California, has an all-time low precipitation level of 23% of average.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1998 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Nino is frazzling the nerves of California growers of Pima cotton, a high-quality variety that is an important export crop. Rainstorms propelled by the unusual weather phenomenon--and accompanying cold temperatures--have kept cotton growers out of their fields and unable to plant since the March 10 start of the season. By this time, farmers would have had most, if not all, of their Pima cotton seed in the ground.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carefully refraining from mentioning it by name, a series of Southern California officials testified Monday that construction of a peripheral canal or similar facility in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is vital to preventing future water shortages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2012 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
SHAFTER - In this lush pocket of Kern County, where the agriculture and oil industries have long coexisted, Mike Hopkins' almond orchard has become a battlefield in a dispute that extends to the governor's office. Hopkins is standing up to the oil industry - and Gov. Jerry Brown - by filing a lawsuit against the state to bar energy company Venoco Inc. from drilling an exploratory well on his farm without a full environmental review. Venoco has the mineral rights to Hopkins' 38-acre farm.
NEWS
November 18, 1985 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
West Germans are paying less for almonds grown at Fred Starrh's farm in Shafter, Calif. The price is down because the value of the U.S. dollar has fallen. As a result, Starrh estimates that his overall almond sales are up 10% to 15%. But American buyers of videocassette recorders and television sets made by Sony and other Japanese electronics firms will not be so lucky. They will pay more next year, also because the dollar has fallen. The declining U.S.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1992 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it's cotton harvest time in California, the picking machines usually begin in the Imperial Valley, stripping the white blankets from the southwestern corner of the state before gradually moving north into the vast cotton fields of the Central Valley. But this month, the usual slow-paced start of the harvest was depressingly sluggish. Cotton has all but disappeared from the Imperial Valley.
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