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Fred Zinnemann

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
A life of 'Resistance' Fred Zinnemann directed 21 features. Here's a look at three that are in the Getty Research Institute retrospective: 'High Noon' Gary Cooper's lagging career was resurrected with this 1952 western-as-political-allegory for which he won the lead actor Oscar. 'The Search' Montgomery Clift was Oscar-nominated for his performance in this harrowing 1948 drama about refugee children in Europe after the war. 'Julia' Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave play lifelong friends who become involved in the anti-fascist movement in Germany in this 1977 drama.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012
A life of 'Resistance' Fred Zinnemann directed 21 features. Here's a look at three that are in the Getty Research Institute retrospective: 'High Noon' Gary Cooper's lagging career was resurrected with this 1952 western-as-political-allegory for which he won the lead actor Oscar. 'The Search' Montgomery Clift was Oscar-nominated for his performance in this harrowing 1948 drama about refugee children in Europe after the war. 'Julia' Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave play lifelong friends who become involved in the anti-fascist movement in Germany in this 1977 drama.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Fred Zinnemann, who won directing Oscars for 1953's World War II drama "From Here to Eternity" and 1966's historical epic "A Man for All Seasons," never played by the rules. He rankled under the studio system and fought to get the films he wanted to make, not the inconsequential pictures the studios chose for him. "What he was interested in were characters who had to fight for what they believed in against all odds," said his son, Tim Zinnemann. "That is how he was in life. " So it's no wonder that the Getty Research Institute's retrospective on Zinnemann is called "Cinema of Resistance" because it reflects both the themes of his films and his personal philosophy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Fred Zinnemann, who won directing Oscars for 1953's World War II drama "From Here to Eternity" and 1966's historical epic "A Man for All Seasons," never played by the rules. He rankled under the studio system and fought to get the films he wanted to make, not the inconsequential pictures the studios chose for him. "What he was interested in were characters who had to fight for what they believed in against all odds," said his son, Tim Zinnemann. "That is how he was in life. " So it's no wonder that the Getty Research Institute's retrospective on Zinnemann is called "Cinema of Resistance" because it reflects both the themes of his films and his personal philosophy.
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Zinnemann, Academy Award-winning director whose classic films included "High Noon," "From Here to Eternity" and "A Man for All Seasons," died Friday. He was 89. Zinnemann's death in London, where he had lived for more than 30 years, was disclosed by his son Tim, a producer at Pressman Films in Los Angeles. The legendary director earned his first Oscar for the documentary "Benjy" in 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten, based in London, is a frequent contributor to Calendar
For almost a decade now, veteran director Fred Zinnemann, whose signature is on a handful of the most memorable films in Hollywood history, has been in voluntary retirement--driven out of the industry by the venom of reviews of his last film, "Five Days One Summer." His age--he is 85--and some health problems have played a part in the decision, but those notices for the 1983 film, a May-December romance set in the French Alps and starring Sean Connery, left Zinnemann feeling dispirited.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1993 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten, a frequent contributor to Calendar, is based in London
If anyone should know the ingredients for an Oscar-winning movie, Fred Zinnemann is that man. The veteran director, one of film history's most distinguished names, brought 20-odd pictures to the screen in a career spanning 40 years. Marlon Brando's debut film was Zinnemann's "The Men" (1950). Montgomery Clift won an Oscar in Zinnemann's "The Search" (1948), his first major film role. Meryl Streep's screen debut was in Zinnemann's "Julia" (1977).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A quick scan of Fred Zinnemann's resume tells you all you need to know. His was the name on a whole bunch of memorable movies. He was the maestro who directed "High Noon," widely considered the greatest western ever; "From Here to Eternity," one of Hollywood's finest war films; and "A Man for All Seasons," one of cinema's most lauded historical dramas. He won best director Oscars for the latter two films. The second rank includes "The Day of the Jackal," "Julia" and "Oklahoma!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1986 | Steve Hanson and P atricia King Hanson
Brit film makers are fighting to keep colorization from crossing the Atlantic. In the wake of a recent announcement that a Toronto company plans to colorize Sir Carol Reed's "The Third Man," the Directors Guild of Great Britain drafted a kind of "declaration of independence," which protests similar tampering with other British titles. Their cause has been adapted by American signatories to the guild, including Fred Zinnemann ("High Noon"), who declared: "These films were directed by artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Honors, Honors: "James Bond" star Sean Connery will receive the American Cinematheque Award at the annual spring Moving Picture Ball April 10 at the Beverly Hilton. He is the seventh honoree since the ball was started in 1986 to honor an entertainment personality for contributions to film and video. . . . Veteran director Fred Zinnemann will be guest of honor at the annual American Society of Cinematographers Gala Affair Jan. 11 at the Bel-Air Country Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Montgomery Clift gave one of his greatest performances in the Oscar-winning 1953 classic "From Here to Eternity," it is revealed on the new DVD (Columbia TriStar, $25) that he was not the first choice for the role of the tragic hero, Pvt. Robert E. Lee Prewitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Goo Goo Dolls Unharmed in Plane Mishap: A U.S. Navy plane carrying the Goo Goo Dolls skidded off an Italian runway while landing during a rainstorm in Sicily on Sunday. No one aboard was injured. The C-9 aircraft was bringing the group, known for its hits "Slide" and "Iris," back from Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina, the last stop of a Christmas tour of American military bases in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Susan King, Susan King is a Times staff writer
Fred Zinnemann was one of Hollywood's most distinguished directors. The winner of four Oscars, he directed such classics as "High Noon," "From Here to Eternity," "A Man for All Seasons" and "Julia" during his 50-year career. Zinnemann, who died last year at age 89, initially studied in Paris to become a cinematographer. But when the Austrian emigre came to the United States in 1929, he was denied admission to Hollywood's cameraman's union.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Zinnemann seemed almost incapable of directing a bad film. The winner of three Oscars, he also directed several actors to Academy Award-winning performances. Here's a look at some of his films on video. One of Zinnemann's first major films was the exciting 1944 World War II thriller "The Seventh Cross" (MGM/UA, $20). Spencer Tracy and Hume Cronyn (who received a supporting actor nomination) star in this tale of seven men who escape from a German concentration camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A quick scan of Fred Zinnemann's resume tells you all you need to know. His was the name on a whole bunch of memorable movies. He was the maestro who directed "High Noon," widely considered the greatest western ever; "From Here to Eternity," one of Hollywood's finest war films; and "A Man for All Seasons," one of cinema's most lauded historical dramas. He won best director Oscars for the latter two films. The second rank includes "The Day of the Jackal," "Julia" and "Oklahoma!"
NEWS
March 15, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Zinnemann, Academy Award-winning director whose classic films included "High Noon," "From Here to Eternity" and "A Man for All Seasons," died Friday. He was 89. Zinnemann's death in London, where he had lived for more than 30 years, was disclosed by his son Tim, a producer at Pressman Films in Los Angeles. The legendary director earned his first Oscar for the documentary "Benjy" in 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A 1988 letter from Motion Picture Assn. President Jack Valenti to director Fred Zinnemann appeared to contradict at least one of the MPAA's objections to the Film Disclosure Act, a proposed piece of legislation that is currently being considered by both houses of Congress. The letter was referred to during hearings on the bill held Tuesday by the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Montgomery Clift gave one of his greatest performances in the Oscar-winning 1953 classic "From Here to Eternity," it is revealed on the new DVD (Columbia TriStar, $25) that he was not the first choice for the role of the tragic hero, Pvt. Robert E. Lee Prewitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1996 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Legendary film director Fred Zinnemann is battling Universal Pictures over its plans to call a new film "The Day of the Jackal," the title of his own 1973 classic thriller. He is accusing the studio of accepting a new and completely different screenplay and attaching to it an internationally known title. Zinnemann, the 89-year-old director of such landmark Hollywood films as "High Noon," "From Here to Eternity," "Oklahoma!
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | BRIDGET BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steven Spielberg grinned at the mini-size Canon HI8 steady cam documenting the proceedings at the first annual John Huston Award for Artists' Rights ceremony. "If I'd had a camera like this when I was a kid, I wouldn't have had to come to Hollywood. I would have started my own studio back in Arizona."
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