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Freddie Highmore

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November 4, 2007 | Mark Salisbury, Special to The Times
In an acting career that's spanned eight of his 15 years, Freddie Highmore has shared screen time with Johnny Depp (twice), Kate Winslet, Julie Christie, Albert Finney, CGI elves, a tiger and a multitude of Oompa Loompas. And yet, whoever or whatever his costar, Highmore always holds his own on screen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Bates Motel": It is impossible for me to overstate how truly fabulous Vera Farmiga's performance is in the crazy, creepy yet emotionally resonant prequel to "Psycho. " The setting is "Twin Peaks"-evocative and the writing is terrific, if a bit overly concerned with making every person in the mythical White Pine Bay, Ore., (which is really Canada) Not Quite What They Seem. All the actors are solid, especially Freddie Highmore as a young sweater-tugging, fugue-state-experiencing Norman and Max Thieriot as his older black-sheep brother Dylan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Bates Motel": It is impossible for me to overstate how truly fabulous Vera Farmiga's performance is in the crazy, creepy yet emotionally resonant prequel to "Psycho. " The setting is "Twin Peaks"-evocative and the writing is terrific, if a bit overly concerned with making every person in the mythical White Pine Bay, Ore., (which is really Canada) Not Quite What They Seem. All the actors are solid, especially Freddie Highmore as a young sweater-tugging, fugue-state-experiencing Norman and Max Thieriot as his older black-sheep brother Dylan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
The big screen's most formidable mama's boy is coming to TV. Norman Bates, the deranged character of "Psycho" fame, is proving movie stars aren't the only ones hunkering down to the small screen - some of cinema's fictional personas are also making the move. "Bates Motel" is a sort-of prequel to Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 standard set to roll out Monday on A&E. The new series, from Carlton Cuse ("Lost") and Kerry Ehrin ("Friday Night Lights"), tracks the notorious psychopath during his adolescent years in the present day. (Cue the violin screeches.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Brian Triplett, Times Staff Writer
MOST adults aren't foolish enough to believe that chocolate waterfalls exist (though, yes, chocolate fountains abound). Oompa Loompas surely aren't real, and nobody, not even in L.A., is as bizarre as Willy Wonka. The real world couldn't come close, it seems, to approximating the spectacle of director Tim Burton's big-screen version of Roald Dahl's 1964 classic "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," an imaginary candyland world where anything is possible. But try telling that to Charlie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
The big screen's most formidable mama's boy is coming to TV. Norman Bates, the deranged character of "Psycho" fame, is proving movie stars aren't the only ones hunkering down to the small screen - some of cinema's fictional personas are also making the move. "Bates Motel" is a sort-of prequel to Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 standard set to roll out Monday on A&E. The new series, from Carlton Cuse ("Lost") and Kerry Ehrin ("Friday Night Lights"), tracks the notorious psychopath during his adolescent years in the present day. (Cue the violin screeches.)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Luc Besson, the director of such films as "The Fifth Element" and "La Femme Nikita," is directing a combination live-action/computeranimated adaptation of his 2003 children's book "Arthur and the Minimoys." It stars Freddie Highmore and Mia Farrow and will feature the voices of Madonna, Snoop Dogg and David Bowie. The Weinstein Co. has acquired rights to the film in the United States and other English-speaking territories.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2008 | Ron Magid
Creating a "real" fantasy means riding herd on digital characters to avoid the temptation to squish and stretch them into awkward -- not to mention anatomically incorrect -- poses. When making "The Spiderwick Chronicles," director Mark Waters and cinematographer Caleb Deschanel blocked camera moves to accommodate the live actors, and visual effects supervisor Phil Tippett made sure that the digital creations got the same respect.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times staff writer
"The Art of Getting By," about a high school slacker more interested in a girl than in his homework, barely lived up to its name this weekend at the box office. The film, which stars young actors Freddie Highmore and Emma Roberts, had what even distributor Fox Searchlight acknowledged was a "disappointing" opening. According to a studio estimate, the movie collected only $700,000 from 610 theaters for a dismal per-theater average of $1,148. "The Art of Getting By" — previously titled "Homework" when it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January — did worse than two other independent movies that opened this weekend and also played at the Utah event.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
"Bates Motel," which has brought a unique twist to Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho," has been renewed for a third season. A&E Network has ordered 10 new episodes of the drama, which is in its second season. Production is scheduled to begin in the fall. The series, a contemporary prequel to "Psycho" that explores how troubled Norman Bates' psyche unravels during his teen years, stars Freddie Highmore as Norman and Vera Farmiga as his mother, Norma Bates. "Bates Motel," which drew 4.6 million viewers in its second season premiere, is the network's top-rated series in the 18-49 age demographic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2007 | Mark Salisbury, Special to The Times
In an acting career that's spanned eight of his 15 years, Freddie Highmore has shared screen time with Johnny Depp (twice), Kate Winslet, Julie Christie, Albert Finney, CGI elves, a tiger and a multitude of Oompa Loompas. And yet, whoever or whatever his costar, Highmore always holds his own on screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005 | Brian Triplett, Times Staff Writer
MOST adults aren't foolish enough to believe that chocolate waterfalls exist (though, yes, chocolate fountains abound). Oompa Loompas surely aren't real, and nobody, not even in L.A., is as bizarre as Willy Wonka. The real world couldn't come close, it seems, to approximating the spectacle of director Tim Burton's big-screen version of Roald Dahl's 1964 classic "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," an imaginary candyland world where anything is possible. But try telling that to Charlie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Some delicate-flower extreme has been reached with "The Art of Getting By," a charm-free wisp of a movie about that most annoying of recent archetypes: the mopey, privileged adolescent. Hollywood teen rebellion now comes in the form of cherub-faced, overcoat-wearing drip George (Freddie Highmore). A daydreaming, doodling Manhattan senior, George refuses to do homework because he's wise enough — he reads Camus, drinks in Leonard Cohen! — to realize that life is meaningless. But, boy, do his feelings get hurt when he falls for flirty cool chick Sally (Emma Roberts)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2004 | Mike Boehm
The ending of "Two Brothers," the new film by Jean-Jacques Annaud about sibling tiger cubs who are separated by hunters, then reunited in 1920s Cambodia, may induce tears in many viewers. But the large contingent from the Chance Theater in Anaheim Hills who attended the recent premiere at Universal CityWalk had a special reason to be moved.
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