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Frederik W De Klerk

NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk was greeted by hundreds of singing children when he arrived for a meeting with President Felix Houphouet-Boigny in Yamoussoukro. South Africa and Ivory Coast do not have formal diplomatic relations, but they do have close trade ties. A front-page editorial in the government-controlled daily Fraternite Matin appeared to rule out closer diplomatic relations for now.
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NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk announced a major defense reduction, cutting mandatory military service in half and promising to close some military units and facilities. The announcement in Johannesburg came two weeks after South Africa completed the withdrawal of its troops from Namibia, where they had fought a bush war against pro-independence guerrillas since 1966. Ten days ago, in a reversal to longstanding policies of his predecessor, Pieter W.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | Reuters
President Frederik W. de Klerk will meet black nationalist Nelson R. Mandela today to discuss problems concerning his release after 27 years in prison, a senior South African government source said Wednesday. The source, who declined to be named, said that De Klerk and Mandela will discuss "sticking points that have arisen in plans for Mr. Mandela's release."
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The government and the African National Congress announced that they will open discussions May 2 to lay the groundwork for negotiations on South Africa's racial conflicts. The date was agreed to after a meeting last week between President Frederik W. de Klerk and Nelson R. Mandela, the black nationalist group's deputy president.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. congressional delegation said government reforms in South Africa have failed to address black voting rights. They recommended that U.S. economic sanctions remain in place or even be toughened. The three-member group, led by Rep. Howard Wolpe (D-Mich.), acknowledged "some positive developments" since President Frederik W. de Klerk assumed power in August. But, the delegation added after a five-day visit, "we could find no evidence that the government . . .
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Amid a resurgence of political violence, including a spate of attacks on whites, President Frederik W. de Klerk announced plans Wednesday to summon army reservists to duty, step up security in "problem areas" and ask Parliament to lift a 3-year-old moratorium on the death penalty. The president said the government is not considering a halt to constitutional negotiations, which are due to resume next week, "but we will insist that these matters be satisfactorily resolved at the outset."
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities imposed emergency regulations and a curfew on two black townships near the capital of Pretoria to quell anti-government rioting that left two dead and 25 wounded. The battles were triggered by the suspension of power to the area because residents have been boycotting payment of electric bills to protest poor municipal services. Also, President Frederik W. de Klerk announced that he will increase his Cabinet by two ministers to 20, effective Wednesday.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Reuters
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet South African President Frederik W. de Klerk next week in Cape Town and black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela in Namibia, the State Department said Friday. Spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler announced the schedule of Baker's trip to take part Wednesday in marking Namibia's independence from South Africa. Baker is to spend only about five hours in Cape Town. He will also meet Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu and other black leaders.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From The Washington Post
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk was warned Tuesday by nine white right-wing leaders that if he does not hold new elections to show he has white support for negotiations with the "communist" African National Congress they will seek to stop him by "other means." "If the government proceeds on this course and does not call an early election, then of course the government is closing the constitutional doors.
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