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Fredric Rosen

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NEWS
June 17, 1995 | LESLIE HELM and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Fredric Rosen, this was a week to savor. America's most popular rock group had admitted defeat. Pearl Jam acknowledged that it would be unable to set up a nationwide concert tour without the help of Ticketmaster, the company Rosen transformed from a fledgling software firm into the world's biggest ticket operation.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 2004 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
After one big success and one big failure, Fredric Rosen thinks he has found a new way to milk profits: state and county fairs. Rosen took the wraps off his latest Los Angeles-based venture Friday -- a company poised to be the nation's dominant operator of midways and carnivals. North American Midway Entertainment plans to provide food, games and rides at 142 events annually, including 12 of the top 50 fairs in the United States and Canada.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 1997 | MARK SAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fredric Rosen took control of Ticketmaster Inc. in 1982, the company had 25 employees and a negative net worth. Few investors were interested, because the prospect of competing with then-dominant Ticketron seemed ludicrous. Today Ticketmaster is the biggest ticketing company in the world, selling nearly 70 million tickets this year. The company has about 1,400 full-time employees, another 3,500 part-time, and a value of about three-quarters of a billion dollars.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the neon-lighted night of Nov. 11, more than a thousand headbangers will flock to the Joint in the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas to see a band called Jane's Addiction. A few blocks away, a crowd 10 times as large and twice as sober will pack the MGM Grand conference center to hear a speech by Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates. Those two events epitomize how the world has changed for Fredric D. Rosen, a successful but controversial Los Angeles entrepreneur.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the neon-lighted night of Nov. 11, more than a thousand headbangers will flock to the Joint in the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas to see a band called Jane's Addiction. A few blocks away, a crowd 10 times as large and twice as sober will pack the MGM Grand conference center to hear a speech by Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates. Those two events epitomize how the world has changed for Fredric D. Rosen, a successful but controversial Los Angeles entrepreneur.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2004 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
After one big success and one big failure, Fredric Rosen thinks he has found a new way to milk profits: state and county fairs. Rosen took the wraps off his latest Los Angeles-based venture Friday -- a company poised to be the nation's dominant operator of midways and carnivals. North American Midway Entertainment plans to provide food, games and rides at 142 events annually, including 12 of the top 50 fairs in the United States and Canada.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fredric D. Rosen, the Los Angeles entrepreneur who built Ticketmaster into the world's largest computerized ticketing service, today will be named chairman of a new company that will take over the Comdex computer trade show--the largest convention of the personal computer industry.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1998 | Marla Matzer
Terry Barnes has been appointed president and chief executive of Los Angeles-based Ticketmaster Group, succeeding longtime Ticketmaster chief Fredric Rosen, according to sources. Ticketmaster is expected to make the announcement next week, along with the appointment of Gene Cobuzzi as chief operating officer. Barnes has held the title of executive vice president, ticketing; Cobuzzi has been senior vice president of operations.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | Times Wire Services
King World Productions said its shareholders voted to double the number of authorized shares outstanding to 150 million from 75 million and elected two new directors. The share move enables the distributor of syndicated television shows to proceed with a previously declared stock split, payable Feb. 17 to holders of record on Feb. 3. King World said shareholders elected Fredric Rosen, president and chief executive of Ticketmaster Inc., and philanthropist Raymond Chambers to the board.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fredric D. Rosen, the Los Angeles entrepreneur who built Ticketmaster into the world's largest computerized ticketing service, today will be named chairman of a new company that will take over the Comdex computer trade show--the largest convention of the personal computer industry.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1997 | MARK SAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Fredric Rosen took control of Ticketmaster Inc. in 1982, the company had 25 employees and a negative net worth. Few investors were interested, because the prospect of competing with then-dominant Ticketron seemed ludicrous. Today Ticketmaster is the biggest ticketing company in the world, selling nearly 70 million tickets this year. The company has about 1,400 full-time employees, another 3,500 part-time, and a value of about three-quarters of a billion dollars.
NEWS
June 17, 1995 | LESLIE HELM and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Fredric Rosen, this was a week to savor. America's most popular rock group had admitted defeat. Pearl Jam acknowledged that it would be unable to set up a nationwide concert tour without the help of Ticketmaster, the company Rosen transformed from a fledgling software firm into the world's biggest ticket operation.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1995 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
* Olympics: Having lost in the race for the huge ticketing contract for the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Ticketmaster will not go home empty-handed: The Los Angeles-based ticketing industry giant has hooked up with an Encino-based concert promoter to produce and sell exclusive Olympic merchandise. Ticketmaster has agreed to provide financing to Eric/Chandler Ltd.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1995
Re the Pop Eye "For the Record" concerning the Ticketmaster/Pearl Jam dispute (April 16): Apparently, Ticketmaster considered it important for readers not to be misled into thinking that their CEO had declined to comment on the story when what actually happened was a company spokesman said he would be unavailable . Another important issue in urgent need of clarification was that Ticketmaster had never "agreed to disagree" but that it was...
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