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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1985
There really is no such thing as "free" trade any more than there is "free enterprise." Every country controls imports--except the United States. Rather than allow U.S. industries, such as textiles and shoes, to be exterminated by subsidized imports, we should demand fair trade, not free trade. Both Korea and Japan allow very few American-made products to be sold in their countries. Both countries spend very little of their gross national product on defense. Because we provide them with military protection, they can subsidize all their basic industries with funds they would normally spend on military preparedness.
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WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Christi Parsons and Don Lee
SEOUL - Halfway through a long-delayed visit to four allies in Asia, President Obama is struggling to sell a foreign policy strategy that seems under siege on multiple fronts. When he landed in Seoul on Friday, Obama had not locked down a key portion of a long-promised Pacific Rim free-trade deal, had made scant progress in forcing Russia to retreat on Ukraine, and had just seen his administration's Mideast peace efforts put on life support. The setbacks involved unrelated disputes thousands of miles apart, but together they dealt a harsh blow to the president's second-term foreign policy agenda, including its much-touted rebalancing of U.S. strategic interests to the Asia-Pacific region.
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NEWS
November 22, 1988 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney said today that he will recall Parliament in early December to push for passage of the Canada-U.S. free trade agreement scheduled to take effect Jan. 1. The prime minister, speaking at a televised news conference in his hometown of Baie-Comeau in eastern Quebec, also said that he spoke with U.S. President-elect George Bush today and that they plan to meet before Bush's Jan. 20 inauguration.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Julie Makinen
TOKYO - Declaring that "the United States is and always will be a Pacific nation," President Obama launched an Asia tour designed to assure leaders of ally nations that they have a strong U.S. backup at a time of rising regional tension. Appearing with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday morning, Obama said the "U.S.-Japan alliance is the foundation not only for our security in the Asia-Pacific region but also for the region as a whole. " He later said the U.S. security treaty with Japan "covers all territories under Japan's administration, including the Senkaku islands," but reiterated that Washington did not take a position on competing claims of sovereignty.
OPINION
November 6, 2010
The wide differences between Republicans and Democrats on economic policy don't leave much room for compromise over the next two years. But Tuesday's takeover of the House of Representatives by the GOP raises hopes for progress on at least one important initiative: It might help President Obama win approval of a U.S.- South Korea free-trade pact. President George W. Bush was a big proponent of the bilateral agreement with South Korea, which both governments signed in 2007, but he couldn't persuade Congress to approve it. Obama seems an unlikely champion, especially since he criticized the deal during his 2008 presidential campaign.
OPINION
August 12, 2010
Even in the gloom of an international economic crisis, there is a bright spot of hope: free trade. Successful trade pacts with Panama and Colombia and a pending agreement with South Korea will serve to accelerate investment opportunities across a broad spectrum of business and industry, including agriculture, communications technology and natural resources — for Canada, that is. As for the United States, the best that can be said is that farmers,...
OPINION
January 5, 2014
Re "Where the jobs are," Opinion, Jan. 2 Jeff Danziger's piece is a veiled call for protectionism. He notes that in the last 20 years, the countries around the world that have ditched communism are now producing goods to sell to Americans. He says shipping and communication have become more efficient. He criticizes the government for not protecting American consumers from these foreign products. Danziger presents two straw-man arguments against the protectionism he advocates.
OPINION
January 15, 2012
Nearly 20 years after President Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement, a key provision that grants Mexican trucks access to U.S. highways remains stalled. Staunch opposition from unions and consumer groups in this country, which argue that unsafe foreign trucks and inexperienced drivers put U.S. jobs and lives at risk, have successfully shut down even the most modest attempts to comply with NAFTA. In October, the Obama administration tried again, with a pilot program granting three Mexican trucking firms limited access to U.S. roads.
OPINION
June 30, 2011
During the Bush administration, congressional Democrats never tired of finding reasons to oppose important free-trade pacts with South Korea, Colombia and Panama: The deals were too unfriendly to U.S. automakers, they complained, or they didn't protect against human rights abuses, or they failed to guarantee that foreign companies wouldn't undercut American competitors by underpaying their workers. Under President Obama, the agreements have been renegotiated to erase nearly all those objections, and they finally seemed poised for approval.
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By George Miller, Rosa DeLauro and Louise Slaughter
Many supporters of the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, trade agreement are arguing that its fate rests on President Obama's bilateral talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Japan this week. If Japan and the United States can sort out market access issues for agriculture and automobiles, the wisdom goes, this huge deal - in effect, a North American Free Trade Agreement on steroids - can at last be concluded. But this view obscures the many seemingly intractable problems TPP negotiators are grappling with.
OPINION
January 26, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Paralyzed by ideological divisions, Congress has done little to promote economic growth or reduce unemployment since Republicans took over the House in 2011. One exception has been the approval of free-trade deals with South Korea, Colombia and Panama that lower barriers in those countries to U.S. exports and services. Any further trade deals face a huge hurdle, however: The law setting the ground rules for negotiating and approving such agreements expired in 2007. A bipartisan proposal to update the law is pending in both chambers, and lawmakers should make it a top priority to put a version on President Obama's desk.
OPINION
January 5, 2014
Re "Where the jobs are," Opinion, Jan. 2 Jeff Danziger's piece is a veiled call for protectionism. He notes that in the last 20 years, the countries around the world that have ditched communism are now producing goods to sell to Americans. He says shipping and communication have become more efficient. He criticizes the government for not protecting American consumers from these foreign products. Danziger presents two straw-man arguments against the protectionism he advocates.
WORLD
December 2, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - President Viktor Yanukovich appeared to give ground Monday in the face of massive demonstrations that threatened to hobble his government, seeking to reopen talks with the European Union about forging a closer economic relationship. As protesters declared a general strike and blocked access to the government's headquarters in central Kiev, Yanukovich spoke by phone with European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso to ask whether Ukraine could send a delegation to discuss a previously scuttled free trade agreement, the Interfax-Ukraine news agency reported.
WORLD
September 30, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
SHANGHAI - The Chinese government officially opened a new free-trade zone here that is long on promise and short on detail about how it will boost the economy. The 11-square-mile zone is in northeast Shanghai in an industrial area near the international airport. Among other features, the zone is supposed to make it easier for foreign companies to open travel agencies, theaters, banks, brokerage houses and telecommunications firms, sell health insurance or make video game gadgets - businesses that ordinarily are restricted to Chinese companies or joint ventures.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is racing to finish negotiations on a Pacific free-trade pact by year's end, but it's running up against a potentially major obstacle at home. A bipartisan majority in the Senate this week sent a letter pressing the administration to address "foreign currency manipulation" in its talks with Japan and 10 other participating nations in the so-called Trans-Pacific Partnership. The Senate letter didn't mention any country. But there has been an outcry in congressional and business circles, particularly the auto industry, over Japan's much-weakened currency.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- In what could be the toehold that Facebook has been looking for, the giant social network and other websites banned in China may be accessible in a free-trade zone that is being set up in Shanghai, according to a report in the South China Morning Post. China's first free-trade zone will allow the access in a rare exception to strict government control of the Internet, the Hong Kong newspaper reported . The report, citing unnamed government sources, said authorities would also welcome bids from foreign telecommunications firms for licenses to offer Internet services in the trade zone, an area established in July that covers less than 20 miles.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Don Lee
  WASHINGTON -- The U.S. and the European Union will begin talks next month on an ambitious free-trade deal between the two rich regions that exchanged more than $645 billion in goods last year. But the announcement, made Monday ahead of the Group of 8 summit in Northern Ireland, came against a backdrop of contention over French insistence that subsidized domestic movies remain protected as well as questions about U.S. government surveillance programs.   President Obama, standing alongside EU leaders and the United Kingdom's prime minister, David Cameron, nonetheless hailed the proposed trans-Atlantic trade agreement as a "potentially groundbreaking partnership" that would deepen ties between two areas that account for about 45% of the global economy.
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