Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFree Trade Zones
IN THE NEWS

Free Trade Zones

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 12, 1991 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of Mexico and five Central American countries, ending their first meeting ever, agreed Friday to create a regional free-trade zone over the next six years to strengthen their nations' economic ties. At the same time, Venezuela, which acted as an observer to the two days of talks, and Mexico agreed to a new mechanism for financing Central American development projects with oil revenues that would be administered by the Inter-American Development Bank.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 30, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
SHANGHAI - The Chinese government officially opened a new free-trade zone here that is long on promise and short on detail about how it will boost the economy. The 11-square-mile zone is in northeast Shanghai in an industrial area near the international airport. Among other features, the zone is supposed to make it easier for foreign companies to open travel agencies, theaters, banks, brokerage houses and telecommunications firms, sell health insurance or make video game gadgets - businesses that ordinarily are restricted to Chinese companies or joint ventures.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 2, 1985 | G. M. BUSH, Times Staff Writer
Although Santa Ana officials say they envision nothing but economic benefits from a proposed foreign trade zone in the city, a federal official said Wednesday that more than half of the existing 100 zones in the country are financially unsuccessful. The official also hinted that the Long Beach Foreign Trade Zone, Southern California's only existing duty-free trade zone and an opponent of Santa Ana's bid, is among the financially troubled operations.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- In what could be the toehold that Facebook has been looking for, the giant social network and other websites banned in China may be accessible in a free-trade zone that is being set up in Shanghai, according to a report in the South China Morning Post. China's first free-trade zone will allow the access in a rare exception to strict government control of the Internet, the Hong Kong newspaper reported . The report, citing unnamed government sources, said authorities would also welcome bids from foreign telecommunications firms for licenses to offer Internet services in the trade zone, an area established in July that covers less than 20 miles.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of six Southeast Asian nations, vowing to achieve "peace and prosperity" for their booming region, agreed Tuesday to establish a free-trade zone and step up consultations on security matters. Ending a two-day summit conference, leaders from the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) promised to "constantly seek to safeguard its collective interests" in response to the formation of large economic blocs in North America and Western Europe.
NEWS
April 20, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The 34-nation Summit of the Americas that ended here Sunday offered far more than a chat-fest on such regional dilemmas as drugs and poverty: It provided a glimpse of a future in which the United States and its neighbors struggle more collectively than ever before to tackle their problems.
WORLD
August 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Senate gave final congressional approval Thursday to free trade agreements with Singapore and Chile. The accords, already endorsed by the House, will "usher in a new era of enhanced economic ties" with the two nations, said Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.), top Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee. The Senate votes were 66-32 for Singapore and 66-31 for Chile. U.S. Trade Representative Robert B.
OPINION
March 22, 2002 | MARC EDELMAN, Marc Edelman, a professor of anthropology at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center, is author of "Peasants Against Globalization" (Stanford University Press, 1999).
Central America is in the grip of famine, and if President Bush mentions it when he visits El Salvador on Sunday, he will likely suggest that free trade is the solution. Yet Bush's proposed Central American Free Trade Agreement is hardly going to remedy the worsening disaster in rural Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua. Unregulated markets are a large part of the reason why 700,000 Central Americans face starvation and nearly 1million more suffer serious food shortages.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
If you want to get Charlene Barshefsky angry, call her tough. "Ahh," says Barshefsky, the chief U.S. trade negotiator, sitting in her office a block away from the White House. "I think if I was a man no one would use the word tough. . . . When you're female, when people wish to be complimentary, they tend to use the word tough."
NATIONAL
September 25, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Retreating from a central pillar of Bill Clinton's economic strategy, almost all of the leading Democratic presidential candidates are expressing growing skepticism about free trade. Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean and Sens. John F. Kerry of Massachusetts and John Edwards of North Carolina have moved away from past positions and joined Rep. Richard A.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2008 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
The House on Tuesday refused President Bush's demand to ratify a free-trade deal with Colombia, voting to delay consideration of the pact until after the November election. The House's action effectively pushed debate on the politically sensitive trade deal into the next administration and averted a potentially embarrassing showdown for the Democratic presidential candidates. Republicans denounced the move, saying it damaged a key ally and undermined American credibility.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
The crosstown tensions between the White House and Congress broke into the open Wednesday, threatening new obstacles for President Bush's effort to win approval of a free trade agreement with Colombia. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) moved to undo a timetable that would have forced the House to vote on the measure before adjourning for the fall campaign.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2007 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
Congress gave final approval to a free-trade pact with Peru on Tuesday, handing President Bush his first victory on trade since Democrats gained the majority a year ago. Although the Senate overwhelmingly approved the agreement, the White House faces tougher battles on the rest of its trade agenda heading into an election year in which globalization's effect on American jobs, the trade deficit and product safety are expected to be hot campaign issues.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2007 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
In a rare victory for President Bush since Democrats took control of Congress, the House approved a free-trade agreement with Peru on Thursday in a vote that exposed a major rift within the Democratic ranks over the issue.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2007 | John Hoeffel, Times Staff Writer
miami -- Amid signs that Americans are more skeptical about free trade, President Bush pressed Congress on Friday to act on four commercial pacts with other nations, contending that they would invigorate the U.S. economy and create jobs. The president said the deals with Peru, Panama, Colombia and South Korea also would encourage democratic progress in regions crucial to U.S. security. "It is the time to move forward with these pro-growth, pro-democracy agreements," Bush said.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2007 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
washington -- Just a day after Senate Republicans took the lead in scuttling an overhaul of U.S. immigration laws, House Democrats stiff-armed the Bush administration's largest-ever trade deal and declared they would deny the White House the authority it needs to cut more deals.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite opposition from its rival in Long Beach, the Port of Los Angeles was awarded foreign trade zone status Friday in a move that local officials hope will boost the region's economic strength. The designation by the federal government permits manufacturers, warehouses and other businesses located within the foreign trade zone to defer or avoid customs duties on imports and exports.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico is ratified, it will bring a wealth of economic benefits to California and Mexico, including a tripling of trade between the two in the 1990s, according to a study released Monday by Bank of America. California will "gain considerably" from such an agreement primarily because Mexico will become more prosperous, the study predicted. "We are quite optimistic about the effects of a free-trade agreement," said Frederick L.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2006 | From Reuters
The World Trade Organization agreed Thursday to a limited resumption of stalled free trade talks but warned that major powers had not yet shown the flexibility needed for a deal. The WTO's so-called Doha round was suspended in July because of deep differences, particularly over agriculture. But the 149-state body gave the go-ahead to resume discussions. "We need to shift into a higher gear.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration has a prescription for fighting coca growing, sidelining Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and saving thousands of jobs in Latin America: extending free trade for Andean nations. A senior Bush administration official said this week that the White House would push Congress to pass a bill continuing trade benefits for Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia under a little-known law.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|