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NEWS
January 27, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-awaited decision by Canada's Supreme Court on Friday clarified what is and isn't child pornography, upholding a law that bans possession of child pornography but creating exceptions that child advocacy groups decried as "opening the doors to pedophiles." In resolving a yearlong challenge, the court tried to strike a balance between protecting children from sexual exploitation and preserving the freedom of thought, belief and expression.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
In between competitions at Muscle Beach on Wednesday, Heidi Anderson's fiance tried to get her to eat lunch. But each time she reached for a bite of boiled chicken, she was interrupted by another stranger who wanted a photo. Beachergoers who flocked to the Venice Boardwalk to celebrate Independence Day couldn't resist the exceptionally tanned and toned Anderson, who wore nothing but a turquoise bikini and a gold toe ring. Anderson, a Palm Springs hairdresser, happily indulged them, flexing her arms and flashing a smile.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
A hard-hitting series of talks on censorship grabbed center stage this week at the College Art Assn.'s annual conference. Under the umbrella title, "The Thought Police Are Out There: Art, Censorship and the First Amendment," 10 artists and academics addressed philosophic issues and hard cases. The program, closing today at the New York Hilton, was a response to recent controversies that have threatened or curtailed public support of visual art.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The Organization of American States finishes up its annual meeting in Bolivia on Tuesday. The normally humdrum assembly of 35 nations is turning out to be one of the most controversial gatherings in years, thanks to an effort by a handful of countries to weaken one of the OAS' most important and autonomous bodies: the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Those efforts began early this year when Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, sought to prevent the commission's special rapporteur for freedom of expression from doing her job effectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday's Judas Priest verdict--which absolved the British heavy metal quintet and their record company, CBS Records, from responsibility for the suicide attempts of two Nevada youths--is being perceived by the music industry as a Pyrrhic victory at best. Industry observers expressed concerns that the costly legal battle preceding the ruling may have intensified the debate over artistic expression.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Luther Campbell is a wanted man. Ever since Florida Gov. Bob Martinez tried to get Campbell's rap group 2 Live Crew and its sexually explicit "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" album prosecuted last month for violation of the state's pornography and racketeering penal codes, Campbell has been under siege. Recent rulings by district court judges in Florida's Lee and Broward counties have declared the album obscene and banned it for sale to both adults and minors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1990 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About two dozen arts activists lashed out at critics of the National Endowment for the Arts on Tuesday night and announced a July 12 organizing meeting to rally greater Orange County support for the embattled federal agency. At the first meeting in Orange County of the recently formed Long Beach/Orange County chapter of the National Campaign for the Freedom of Expression, arts supporters targeted Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1995 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two decades, students at Pomona College have shared their views with peers by writing them on Walker Wall, a free-standing structure on the northern edge of campus that has doubled as a barrier against flood waters and a canvas for student expression. But a wave of racial and homophobic incidents could result in the fall of the campus symbol of freedom of speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
When Inette Miller sold the film and television rights to her book, "Burning Bridges," to Lorimar-Telepictures, the contract--like most book-to-film deals negotiated in Hollywood--stated that besides money, Miller would receive an on-screen credit reading "Based on the book by Inette Miller." But when "Burning Bridges" airs on ABC Sunday, Miller's name will be nowhere in sight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The New School for Social Research in New York City filed suit against the National Endowment for the Arts Wednesday--arguing that a requirement that NEA grant recipients pledge not to produce obscene work is an illegal restraint of artistic free expression. In filing the action in U.S.
WORLD
September 8, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
A retired Chinese businesswoman was given a nine-month prison sentence Friday for obstructing traffic and "stirring up trouble" in what had become a test case for freedom of expression in China. The charges against Wang Lihong, 56, stem from her protest in 2010 in eastern China's Fujian province in support of three bloggers. The three were charged with defamation after they tried to help a mother investigating her daughter's death. Among Wang's most vociferous supporters was the dissident artist Ai Weiwei.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
The largely peaceful revolution that ended Hosni Mubarak's regime in Egypt also has the potential to reshape the repressive cultural climate in the country and perhaps elsewhere in the Arab world, according to filmmakers, musicians and other cultural figures who have been watching and participating in the uprising in Cairo. Even as events unfolded in Tahrir Square and across the capital, many artists began filming documentaries and composing music along lines that previously would have been forbidden by the government.
WORLD
December 16, 2010 | By Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
The titles in one corner of Kinokuniya bookstore in Tokyo's Shinjuku district suggest the kind of themes that manga comics fans crave: romance, feudal-era adventure, betrayal. But above the packed bookshelves a sign reads, "Adult manga. " It's the hard-core content within this genre of comics or cartoons, depicting rape, incest and sex crimes, that lawmakers in Tokyo want to keep out of the hands of minors. The Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly on Wednesday approved an ordinance that makes it illegal to sell or rent sexually explicit manga and anime that "unjustifiably glorifies" violent sexual acts to anyone younger than 18. The law, which goes into effect next year, also bans images of fictional characters that appear to be underage and are engaging in sexual acts.
WORLD
October 9, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
Imprisoned Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, a bold stroke that highlighted China's ongoing repression of free expression ? and its toxic distaste for criticism from abroad. The award came despite threats from Chinese officials who sought to dissuade the judges from honoring Liu, a 54-year-old writer who has remained unbowed in his decades-long fight for freedom of expression and democratic reform. Liu's writings have brought him lengthy stints in prison, labor camp and house arrest, and have stripped him of the right to publish or teach in his homeland.
WORLD
October 9, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
Before he was anything else, a hunger striker or inmate, dissident or symbol, Liu Xiaobo was a bookish literature professor and an essayist desperate to be able to write about politics, art and life without restraint. His dedication to writing has been his defining characteristic, those who know him say, and it's what hauled him into politics ? an intense and dogged desire for the freedom of expression. Everything else, the years of struggle against the Communist Party and his unveiling as this year's Nobel Peace Prize laureate, flowed from that point.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2010 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Chinese censors blocked access to Facebook and Twitter a year ago for fear the foreign sites could be used to sow political unrest. Now it appears they're taking aim at the popular Chinese imitators that filled the void. Known as microblogs, or weibo accounts in Chinese, these personal sites function a lot like Twitter, giving users the ability to post messages and links in short, almost instantaneous bursts. Offered by China's leading Web portals, microblogs have surged in popularity.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canada's Supreme Court overruled a law that banned the country's 250,000 federal government employees from engaging in political activities. The public servants had been barred by law from taking part in political activities such as handing out pamphlets, donating money to parties or speaking at political meetings. But the country's highest court said the section banning the activities under the Public Service Employment Act was an infringement of the right of freedom of expression.
WORLD
January 16, 2009 | Ju-min Park and John M. Glionna
He was a self-styled Internet prophet, an economic pundit who went by the name of Minerva, after the Roman goddess of wisdom. In weblogs posted last year that drew a cult-like following, he pontificated on South Korea's ailing economy, castigated policymakers and forecast dire scenarios that many investors took to heart. He was a genius, they said, a mysterious inside trader with a Matt Drudge-like acumen for scoops that uncannily predicted the global economic crisis.
WORLD
October 14, 2008 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
A beauty queen in a full-length evening gown is enough to make Abu Mohammed Jibril's blood boil. Those bare arms and uncovered head. That cleavage. And don't get him started on the bikini portion of the show. Miss Universe is disgusting pornography to the deputy head of Indonesia's Mujahedin Council. "It's destructive," he said of the contest that airs here. "Miss Universe is very famous, so Muslim mothers want their daughters to be like Miss Universe and copy what they've seen.
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