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Freedom Of Expression

NEWS
September 19, 1989 | ELIZABETH KASTOR, The Washington Post
The director and executive trustees of the embattled Corcoran Gallery of Art issued a statement Monday expressing "regret" for offending members of the arts community with their cancellation of a show of Robert Mapplethorpe photographs, and said: "Our course in the future will be to support art, artists and freedom of artistic expression."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 100 would-be artists got a chance to work alongside the real thing on Saturday at the Woman's Building. The event was the opening of "Taking Liberties," an exhibition by visual and performance artists whose work has come under fire for its political, sexual or religious content.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a small Leningrad flat that eventually became an underground mini-gallery for American tourists, Vladislav Sukhorukov painted for 15 years fearing a knock on the door from the KGB. Under Mikhail S. Gorbachev and perestroika, freedom of expression is easier to come by in the Soviet Union today. But art supplies and sales to visiting foreigners like Paula Spellman of Ojai are not.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I think my appointment is really a signal," said Roberto Bedoya, the new executive director of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, during his first day on the job. "It's no longer a Euro-centric world, or a Euro-centric Los Angeles, and LACE has been behind in recognizing that. I think my appointment says, 'Here is Roberto Bedoya, a person in charge of a multidisciplinary arts organization, and he's a person of color.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Government interference in the arts took a drubbing Saturday as several hundred artists and their supporters, including some pointedly dressed as culture police, staged a rally to protest legislation that would outlaw federal funding for works of art deemed to be offensive or indecent. The protesters, who congregated on the grounds of the Federal Building in Westwood in one of many demonstrations held nationwide, demanded that Congress defeat the controversial measure proposed by Sen.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1997 | From Reuters
A court acquitted a left-wing German politician Monday who had been charged with aiding and supporting guerrilla acts with information linked to her home page on the Internet. The court ruled that Angela Marquardt, 25, a former deputy leader of Germany's reform communist Party of Democratic Socialism, could not be held responsible for the contents of a magazine Germans could access via a "hyperlink" on her home page.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | From United Press International
A parody about Sen. Jesse Helms' efforts to restrict the National Endowment for the Arts is about to hit the radio airwaves. The Charlotte Observer reported Tuesday that Helms (R-N.C.) is featured in the offbeat lyrics of songwriter Loudon Wainwright III, whose recording "Jesse Don't Like It" is scheduled for release July 23.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI and CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of more than 160 theaters, playwrights, directors, actors and theater figures has filed a friend-of-the-court brief supporting Los Angeles choreographer Bella Lewitzky in a lawsuit challenging an anti-obscenity certification imposed on grantees by the National Endowment for the Arts. The petition was filed in federal court in Los Angeles earlier this week after the judge in the case rejected a motion by government lawyers to dismiss Lewitzky's lawsuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1990 | JOE VELAZQUEZ
A group of Los Angeles-area artists sponsored a high-tech anti-censorship campaign Tuesday at some of the city's toniest restaurants. The Coalition for Freedom of Expression--artists opposing censorship and restrictions in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts--set up computers at seven locations around town and urged patrons to sign form letters addressed to senators and representatives urging them to oppose efforts in Congress to restrict NEA funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"There's a plague sweeping the country," says Daniel J. Martinez, "that only now is being recognized." And he's not just talking about AIDS. He's also referring to "institutionalized racism, inequities in education and inequities in economics. This country is willing to spend billions of dollars on war, but unable to help its citizens." Art, he thinks, can address all that, particularly those inequities, by giving voice and expression to all.
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