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Freedom Of Religion

NEWS
January 15, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A sharply divided federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Thursday that a landlord may refuse to rent to an unmarried couple if doing so would violate his or her religious scruples. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a case from Alaska, but the 2-1 ruling would also apply to California and appears to override the state housing discrimination law as well as similar laws in several other Western state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998
A sidewalk preacher from a religious group with an anti-white Gospel message said Wednesday that a charge against him for disturbing the peace in Pasadena violates his 1st Amendment rights. "It may be not what traditional churches are teaching, but that is not our problem . . . many people get offended," said Gregory Hamilton, a member of the Israeli Church of Universal Practical Knowledge. He is being arraigned today on a misdemeanor count of disturbing the peace in an Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In what could be a test of religious freedom, a sidewalk preacher from a militant religious group that touts an unconventional anti-white Gospel has been charged by Pasadena authorities with disturbing the peace. Gregory Hamilton, a member of the Israeli Church of Universal Practical Knowledge, is to be arraigned Thursday on the misdemeanor offense, which stems from a street corner exchange last month in the Old Pasadena shopping district, city prosecutor Tracy Webb said.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the snowcapped mountains separating China's western provinces from Tibet, monks at a scattering of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries struggle to keep their religion alive. Just as part of the daily meditation involves cultivating flowers and trees on the grounds, the monks and lamas are devoted to sowing the seeds of Buddhism in a modern world. On this arid plateau, neither is easy.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
Putting himself at odds with religious groups, Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday vetoed a bill that limited government restrictions on religious practices. The Republican governor struck down a measure by Assemblyman Joe Baca (D-Rialto) that would have required state and local agencies to demonstrate a compelling need before taking actions that restrict religious activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | BENJAMIN J. HUBBARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As hundreds of thousands of students prepare to return to public schools after Labor Day, a bill sits on Gov. Pete Wilson's desk that could affect many of them and their teachers. AB 1617, the Religious Freedom Protection Act, would prevent state and local governments from interfering with religious observances unless a compelling reason could be shown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1998 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court, citing religious freedom guaranteed by the 1st Amendment, has upheld a lower court decision to throw out a civil lawsuit against the Christian Science Church over the death of a 12-year-old Orange County boy. In a 2-1 decision, a Court of Appeal panel in Santa Ana decided that Christian Science followers have a right to follow their belief in spiritual healing over mainstream medicine.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A majority of the House voted Thursday for a "religious freedom" constitutional amendment that would allow prayers in public schools, religious icons on government property and the use of tax dollars to pay for parochial schools. But the 224-203 vote fell 65 short of the two-thirds majority needed for passage.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Saturday that "appropriate religious activity has flourished in our schools" under his administration and said it would be wrong to amend the Constitution to authorize prayer in public schools. In his weekly radio address, the president announced he is issuing revised federal guidelines that describe a variety of permissible religious practices in schools.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over strong opposition from the Clinton administration and big business, the House overwhelmingly approved legislation Thursday requiring Washington to impose economic sanctions against countries, including allies, that practice religious persecution. The bill is an unprecedented move by Congress to project one of America's founding ideals, religious freedom, into foreign policy.
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