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Freedom Of Speech

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NEWS
July 3, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The news accounts, now 70 years old, offer only fragments of the "ghastly drama" that surrounded the marriage of Mary Kenan Flagler Bingham, "the richest woman in America." She was the widow of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler and her estate was worth between $60 million and $100 million. Her bridegroom was Judge Robert Worth Bingham, a Kentucky lawyer without independent means. Their wedding in 1916 made headlines, even in New York. And so did her mysterious death eight months later.
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NATIONAL
May 18, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
LAREDO, Texas -- A recent wave of kidnappings in Nuevo Laredo was prominently featured in a recent Sunday edition of El Mañana, one of the largest and most long-standing Spanish-language newspapers on the border. But the story carried no byline, and no residents were quoted or pictured. "People don't want to go out for interviews - they say, 'No, we may get kidnapped,'" said Ninfa Cantú Deándar, who runs the paper with her siblings. Because of threats from Mexican cartels, the paper - published in the twin cities of Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, and Laredo, Texas - is operating very differently these days.
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NEWS
November 20, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bulgarians celebrated their newly revived freedom of speech Sunday by gathering in parks to discuss political ideas, including the creation of opposition parties to challenge the ruling Communist regime. Meanwhile, a popular discussion program returned to national television Sunday night, presenting a series of provocative interviews sometimes critical of the government.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
When can you be arrested for talking to someone? When can you be arrested for touching them? When the person you're talking to or touching is the vice president of the United States, it seems. On June 16, 2006, Steven Howards spotted Vice President Dick Cheney, who was coming out of a shopping mall in Beaver Creek, Colo., and chatting amiably with several people. Howards approached the vice president and allegedly pushed or touched him on the shoulder as he told him that his "policies on Iraq are disgusting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | RANDY LEWIS
W ithout freedom of thought there can be no such thing as wisdom, and no such thing as public liberty without freedom of speech; which is the right of every man as far as by it he does not hurt and control the right of another: and this is the only check it ought to suffer, and the only bounds it ought to know. --Benjamin Franklin, 1722 (at age 16) Warning: This column contains words and ideas that may be offensive to some readers.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Stanford University, joining a national trend, has adopted new rules against racial and sexual harassment by students, officials announced Friday. However, as at other campuses, opponents contend that the regulations violate freedom of speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1994 | ESTHER IVEREM, NEWSDAY
Comedian Martin Lawrence has titled his first film "You So Crazy," after the name of his national stand-up comedy tour. But the Motion Picture Assn. of America ratings board, which has slapped the film with an NC-17 rating, thinks it's more like "You So Nasty." Lawrence held a press conference Tuesday at Manhattan's Omni Berkshire Hotel to announce his appeal of the rating. The appeal is scheduled to be heard Feb. 23, nine days before the film opens in New York and Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
First Amendment activists and a member of Congress said this week that the FBI may have stepped out of line with a letter accusing a Compton rap group of encouraging "violence against and disrespect" for law enforcement officers. "The FBI should stay out of the business of censorship," said Rep. Don Edwards (D-San Jose), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee's subcommittee on civil and constitutional rights, when informed of an Aug.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What the &#?@!!? Chances are, when you read that sentence, you filled in the last word with an expletive. We knew you would. Still, we didn't print the word in question because we didn't want to offend you. That's the odd thing about swearing. You know a whole slew of curse words; you may even say some yourself.
SPORTS
March 4, 2000
Our American system of checks and balances does work. The mediator made the correct decision in reducing the penalties imposed on Atlanta pitcher John Rocker. No matter how strongly we disagree with Rocker's statements, he is entitled to the same 1st Amendment freedom-of-speech rights and protection as those who strongly criticize him. Freedom of speech and press is easy to accept when someone talks about mom and apple pie. The true test of the 1st Amendment arises when we hear things we find offensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2011 | James Rainey
Let's stipulate that you don't have to be a thug, racist or fool to oppose taxpayer-supported grants to illegal-immigrant college students. Let's agree, meanwhile, that you can support financial aid to those undocumented migrant students without being a squishy-headed traitor. The California Dream Act raises thorny issues about whether non-citizens should get government benefits at a time when many state services are being slashed. The arguments on the two sides are powerful enough that Gov. Jerry Brown has been taking weeks to decide whether to sign the legislation.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard and Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
Facing increased scrutiny at home and a war crimes indictment abroad, Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir stood before his National Assembly on Tuesday and promised a freer, more inclusive government. Bashir, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court in connection with massacres in Darfur, spoke just days after attending ceremonies marking South Sudan's independence from his own Khartoum-based government. Sudan is entering a "second republic" comprising mainly Muslim Arabs, and people will be able to vote on a new constitution crafted with widespread participation, he said.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Despite free-speech concerns, Supreme Court justices sounded sympathetic Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by the father of a Marine killed in Iraq whose funeral was picketed by protesters with signs like, "Thank God for IEDs. " The justices appeared inclined to set a limit to freedom of speech when ordinary citizens are targeted with especially personal and hurtful attacks. The 1st Amendment says the government may not restrict free speech, but it is less clear when it shields speakers from private lawsuits.
OPINION
July 24, 2010
It's called "libel tourism" — the practice of bringing a defamation lawsuit against an author or publisher in a country with less robust protections of free speech than those afforded Americans by the 1st Amendment and Supreme Court decisions. Many Americans may be surprised to learn that a leading destination for libel tourists is the United Kingdom. The United States can't prevent Britain or other countries from making it easier to win libel suits that might not succeed in this country, where even publications that include errors have received 1st Amendment protection.
OPINION
June 17, 2010
UC Irvine officials recently recommended a one-year suspension for the Muslim Student Union, the group that appears to have been behind the disruption of a speech by Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren on the campus in February. It's an apt punishment for what was clearly an inappropriate protest, although it will satisfy neither conservative politicians such as Assemblyman Chuck DeVore (R-Irvine), who wrote a letter to the university's chancellor urging that the group be permanently banned, nor defenders of the Muslim group, who think the students were only exercising their free-speech rights.
OPINION
April 4, 2009
Most Americans understand that protecting free speech means defending not only those who speak truth to power but those who hate us, scare us, revolt us or offend us. The United States has upheld the right of Nazis to march through Jewish neighborhoods and the right of Hustler publisher Larry Flynt to portray Jerry Falwell losing his virginity to his mother in an outhouse.
WORLD
August 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong vowed to relax Singapore's tight rules on public gatherings in his first policy speech since he was sworn in 10 days earlier. Singapore, which bars demonstrations, gatherings or speeches without a permit under strict free-speech controls, will allow unlicensed public talks if they are held indoors and avoid "sensitive subjects" such as race and religion, Lee said.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man accused of unleashing a string of curse words after he tumbled out of his canoe last summer was convicted Friday of violating an 1897 ban on swearing in front of children. Jurors in rural Arenac County, 130 miles north of Detroit, deliberated less than an hour before convicting Timothy Boomer, 25. The factory worker from the Detroit suburbs could be jailed for 90 days. Boomer did not show any reaction when the verdict was read.
WORLD
July 24, 2008 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
In a nod to criticism that it is stifling free speech during the Olympics, China intends to designate space in three public parks as "protest zones" for people to vent their grievances, officials said Wednesday. Protesters will have to obtain permission from the Ministry of Public Security in advance, giving the names of organizers, the topic and the number of participants. Still, the protest zones are a break from the Chinese government's zero tolerance of dissent.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2008 | DeeDee Correll, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dick Cheney does not have to testify as an eyewitness in a civil lawsuit filed against Secret Service agents by a man who says he was wrongfully arrested for criticizing the vice president -- at least not yet, U.S. District Magistrate Judge Craig Shaffer ruled Tuesday.
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