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Freedom Of The Press

NEWS
June 18, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Supreme Court ruled Friday that city officials may regulate where newspaper boxes are placed on city streets but that they do not have the authority to decide which newspapers are sold there. In a narrowly crafted 4-3 opinion, the high court struck down a law in a Cleveland suburb that gave the mayor the power to decide which newspapers would get licenses to sell their papers in racks on city streets. Citing the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of the press, Justice William J. Brennan Jr.
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NEWS
June 30, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
Former Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird, voted out of office in a rancorous political battle last fall, urged Monday that candidates be granted wider access to television during election campaigns. "We've got to do something about opening up television on a more equal basis," she said after a speech here. Bird did not endorse public financing for political campaigns or make any other specific proposals, nor would she blame her defeat and that of two other justices on a lack of campaign funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that may have legal implications for the numerous "reality" TV series that have cameramen and reporters accompanying law-enforcement agents in their work, a federal judge here has criticized both the Secret Service and the U.S. Attorney's office for taking a crew from CBS' "Street Stories" on a search of the home of a man under investigation for credit-card fraud. U.S.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radio Rossiya, which in the past two months has become a strong alternative political voice in the Soviet Union, was restricted this weekend to frequencies that cannot be received in many parts of the country in a Kremlin reassertion of its control over the mass media. But the Russian Federation, the sponsor of Radio Rossiya and the country's largest republic, vowed Sunday to ensure that the station's uncensored reports are heard again throughout Russia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Jewish leaders said Wednesday that they are not satisfied with a written apology by editors of the Saddleback Community College's student-run newspaper for publishing a commentary that was widely criticized as being anti-Semitic. Only a retraction, or a written admission of error, would lay the issue to rest, the Jewish leaders said.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court heard lively debate Tuesday on two controversial questions: does the Constitution's guarantee of freedom of the press extend to student journalists and are military contractors immune from suits by servicemen injured or killed by defective products?
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an escalating controversy over Hong Kong's autonomy, journalists in the territory launched a protest campaign Tuesday over what they said are attempts to curtail press freedom. "We will not be propaganda machines," said a petition circulated by the Hong Kong Journalists Assn. during a 24-hour drive to obtain signatures from local media outlets. The move came after Beijing warned journalists here not to report on viewpoints supporting Taiwanese independence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Editors of Saddleback College's student-run newspaper, under fire for publishing an opinion piece that attacks Israel, vowed Wednesday not to bow to pressure for a retraction from administrators and local Jewish leaders who said the article was anti-Semitic. Staff members of the Lariat, however, have agreed, to print a two-paragraph "editor's note" in today's edition of the weekly that expresses "regret (over) any emotional distress (the) commentary and illustration have caused."
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | CHARLES P.WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
They write in the newspapers whatever they want ; They get into beds, peeping through keyholes ; There's nothing that can be done ; There's no mercy here. -- From the song, "My Little Journalist" That popular song, by one of Israel's most famous singers, is a poignant protest about the media's apparently insatiable appetite for gossip about entertainment figures.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the center of the political firestorm in Soviet Georgia stands a sad-eyed man in a natty, double-breasted suit--the national paradox of Georgia. Four months after being swept into the presidency with 87% of the vote, Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia (pronounced ZVEE-AHD GAHM-suh-HER-dee-uh) has provoked opposition that threatens to explode into full-scale civil war.
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