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Freedom Of The Press

NATIONAL
August 1, 2004 | David G. Savage and Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writers
A generation ago, media lawyers could invoke the words "1st Amendment" and "prior restraint" confident that judges would agree that their news organizations had a constitutional right to publish truthful information about newsworthy matters. These days, media lawyers say the same words, but they are not so confident that judges will agree with them. The Kobe Bryant case in Colorado is only the latest in which judges did what was once nearly unthinkable.
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BUSINESS
September 29, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court said Tuesday that it will rule on whether the First Amendment forbids the government from determining what channels a cable company must carry. At issue is the 1992 Cable TV Act, in which Congress generally required local cable operators to carry the signals of all the broadcast stations in their area. The law was passed in response to consumers' anger over rising rates and spotty service.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge put off until Wednesday a hearing on an order that he issued barring The Times from publishing information about security measures installed at the home of San Diego County Sheriff John Duffy. San Diego Superior Court Judge Jeffrey T. Miller refused, after a closed meeting Friday in chambers with lawyers for The Times and for Duffy, to lift the order that he issued late Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2006 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys for two reporters, who face jail if they refuse to reveal who gave them secret testimony on the use of steroids by star athletes, argued Friday that hamstringing the press' ability to gather news would harm the public interest more than the leak did.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special Senate counsel investigating news leaks on Monday subpoenaed telephone records of the two reporters who broke the story last fall of Anita Faye Hill's allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. The two reporters and their news organizations, Timothy Phelps of Newsday and Nina Totenberg of National Public Radio, argued that the new order violates the First Amendment rights of a free press and is a politically dangerous abuse of senatorial power.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, responding to complaints over a federal marshal's erasing of journalists' tape recordings last week, said he regretted the incident and sent a letter of apology to the two reporters. "The action was not taken at my direction. I was as upset as you were," Scalia said in a letter sent Friday to the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rarely a week goes by when the little newsstand opposite Damascus Gate of Jerusalem's Old City does not receive a new Arabic-language newspaper or magazine seeking a place amid the tumult of the Palestinian press. " Dakakim-- shop windows," Dana, the aged vendor, said dismissively as he hung up the newest publications for display. "They are nothing but shop windows for this group or that. They are published to sell a point of view, and people look but rarely buy.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The evening news in Beirut has always been a brash bouillabaisse of political intrigue, scandal, light features and bombast, with a sprinkling of bullets, bombs and gore. Sure, the government-owned TeleLiban offers the standard footage of the prime minister, president and House Speaker touring factories and greeting guests (while Beirut yawns). But for livelier news, and a different spin, most of Lebanon tunes in each night to the Lebanese Broadcasting Corp.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2005 | David G. Savage and James Rainey, Times Staff Writers
News reporters do not have a 1st Amendment right to refuse to testify about their conversations with government officials, a three-judge panel of a U.S. appeals court said Tuesday, upholding a judge's order that could put reporters from Time magazine and the New York Times in jail. The decision by the panel of the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
North Carolina death-row inmate David Lawson and talk show host Phil Donahue were waiting Monday to see whether the U.S. Supreme Court would allow the killer's execution to be shown on television. Lawson, 38, is scheduled to be put to death by cyanide gas at 2 a.m. EDT Wednesday; Donahue wants to videotape the event and televise it. Lawson has said he was suffering from depression when he broke into what he thought was empty house in 1980.
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