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Freedom Riders

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In the cavalcade of American history, there are some stories that can't be told too often. Our collective memory is appallingly short, and it is useful to be reminded that not only are we a work in progress, but also that progress, in the sense of more things improving for more people, can be bloody work. Entrenched interests like to stay entrenched, securing the status quo by means of "the law," which has been written or rewritten to their satisfaction, and the brute force that backs it up. Such was the state of some of the nation in May 1961, when 13 men and women, black and white, ages 18 to 61 — and including a young John Lewis, now a respected congressman from Georgia — boarded two buses in Washington, D.C., and headed south.
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OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By Betty DeRamus
Black History Month reminds me of a really great golden oldies station, always blaring the same handful of terrific tunes. Every February, it plays Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman soul - with a chorus or two of the George Washington Carver blues. Now don't get me wrong. This is my kind of history, and my kind of heroes, and I understand why we must tell every generation their stories. I just think that including some fresh tales too would produce a far fuller picture of how blacks enriched America.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Lee Daniels' The Butler" opened in mid-August, and, in the ensuing months, its namesake director has participated in countless Q&As and receptions both to promote the movie and to keep it alive in the Oscar conversation. But Daniels had never been involved in an event quite like the one hosted last night by actor Denzel Washington at the Motion Picture Academy's Goldwyn Theater. Six members of the Freedom Riders, the civil rights activists who defied Jim Crow laws and rode interstate buses into the Deep South in the early '60s, attended the screening and shared their memories during a Q&A following the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
On one level, the new historical dramedy "Saving Mr. Banks" chronicles the efforts of studio head Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) to persuade the cantankerous British author P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) to allow her "Mary Poppins" children's books to be made into a movie. On another level, it's also something of an ode to the old Hollywood studio system, with a small army of Disney employees all toiling together on the back lot. At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series , some of the "Saving Mr. Banks" cast members talked about the old-fashioned collaborative approach.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Six members of the Freedom Riders, a group of college students who defied segregation on interstate buses in 1961, got back on the bus to retrace their journey from Montgomery to Birmingham. They were joined by about 100 students on a trip organized by Vanderbilt University. The Freedom Riders started as a group of 15 volunteers but swelled to a movement of more than 400 during their protests in Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The movement that brought Kenyatta McLean, 21, and Robert Singleton, 75, together at a Martin Luther King Jr. tribute Saturday began in the summer of 1961, when college students were recruited to become "Freedom Riders" and streamed by bus into the troubled South to push for abolition of racial separation laws. With the 50th anniversary of those historic rides approaching, McLean was introduced to Singleton and his wife, Helen, at the Culver City Senior Center. The meeting spurred a cross-generational dialogue about the role of civic engagement and the forms it takes in the era of Facebook and Twitter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1997
ANGERITA WRIGHT Homemaker, Los Angeles; was a child in Alabama at the start of the civil rights movement in the 1950s I tell my sons that I survived the 1950s and 60s in Montgomery, Ala. They can survive Los Angeles. I was in the first grade when the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott began [after Rosa Parks refused to ride at the back of the bus.] At that time and to this day, Montgomerians talk about the bus boycott with a great deal of pride. It brought the people together. Neighbors who prior to the boycott did not speak began sharing car rides to avoid riding the bus. It took a whole community to make the boycott work.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
Arriving to a hero's welcome Saturday, Ed Blankenheim said he still recalls the hatred on the faces of the men and women who surrounded and burned his bus in Alabama 40 years ago. Blankenheim, 67, one of the original Freedom Riders, rode in a bus caravan Saturday re-creating the event. He broke down in tears at a Birmingham museum when he saw a replica of the Greyhound bus that had been firebombed in Anniston. "Everything came back to me--the ugliness, the hate," Blankenheim said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Geoffrey Rush's breakthrough performance was his portrayal of the pianist David Helfgott in the 1996 film "Shine," for which he won the Oscar for lead actor. Seventeen years later, he finds himself playing a musician of a different sort in "The Book Thief": Hans Hubermann, a German house painter and amateur accordionist who takes in a 10-year-old foster daughter (Sophie Nelisse) amid the chaos of World War II. Speaking at  the Envelope Screening Series , Rush talked about how getting acquainted with the accordion  helped him understand the character of Hans on a deeper level.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011
Bolton Colburn is leaving the Laguna Art Museum after 24 years — including the last 14 as its director. His resignation, effective May 13, is voluntary, Colburn and Robert Hayden III, president of the museum's board, said Monday, and reflects no internal friction at the seaside institution that's devoted to California art. Colburn, 57, began his museum career in the early 1980s at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art (now the Museum of...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Geoffrey Rush's breakthrough performance was his portrayal of the pianist David Helfgott in the 1996 film "Shine," for which he won the Oscar for lead actor. Seventeen years later, he finds himself playing a musician of a different sort in "The Book Thief": Hans Hubermann, a German house painter and amateur accordionist who takes in a 10-year-old foster daughter (Sophie Nelisse) amid the chaos of World War II. Speaking at  the Envelope Screening Series , Rush talked about how getting acquainted with the accordion  helped him understand the character of Hans on a deeper level.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
"Lee Daniels' The Butler” tells the story of Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker), a White House butler who serves eight presidents and is caught up in the tumultuous civil rights movement. But, for Daniels, the heart of the story lies with the transcendent love between a father and son. That, and a moment shared with his mother, attracted Daniels to the project. As a youth, Daniels teased his mother about her missing tooth. The reason behind it remained hidden until one year she told him that she lost it while she was protesting voter injustice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Lee Daniels' The Butler" opened in mid-August, and, in the ensuing months, its namesake director has participated in countless Q&As and receptions both to promote the movie and to keep it alive in the Oscar conversation. But Daniels had never been involved in an event quite like the one hosted last night by actor Denzel Washington at the Motion Picture Academy's Goldwyn Theater. Six members of the Freedom Riders, the civil rights activists who defied Jim Crow laws and rode interstate buses into the Deep South in the early '60s, attended the screening and shared their memories during a Q&A following the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - The allegations might have quickly chased a less combative politician from office: that he sexually harassed staff members and constituents, groping, grabbing, forcibly kissing, making lewd comments, making himself a "threat to all women. " But San Diego Mayor Bob Filner is no average politician, having started out as a Freedom Rider in the civil rights movement and then spending three decades as an officeholder, including 20 years in Congress. His reputation is that of a street fighter - one with a loyal following among voters but few close allies among politicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Under a pro-business Republican mayor, it was a no-brainer: allocating millions of dollars each year to buy national advertising for the tourism industry - a major economic driver in this vacation mecca. Then Bob Filner got elected, and he had questions: Why couldn't Sheraton and Hilton buy their own advertising? And why should the cash-strapped city lavish funds on an industry that pays low wages to bottom-rung employees like maids and bellhops? The new Democratic mayor also thought the city attorney should provide him with legal guidance on the matter in private, not in front of reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
"Lee Daniels' The Butler” tells the story of Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker), a White House butler who serves eight presidents and is caught up in the tumultuous civil rights movement. But, for Daniels, the heart of the story lies with the transcendent love between a father and son. That, and a moment shared with his mother, attracted Daniels to the project. As a youth, Daniels teased his mother about her missing tooth. The reason behind it remained hidden until one year she told him that she lost it while she was protesting voter injustice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
On one level, the new historical dramedy "Saving Mr. Banks" chronicles the efforts of studio head Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) to persuade the cantankerous British author P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) to allow her "Mary Poppins" children's books to be made into a movie. On another level, it's also something of an ode to the old Hollywood studio system, with a small army of Disney employees all toiling together on the back lot. At a recent installment of the Envelope Screening Series , some of the "Saving Mr. Banks" cast members talked about the old-fashioned collaborative approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011
'Freedom Riders: American Experience' Where: KOCE When: 9 p.m. Monday Rating: TV-PG-LV (may be unsuitable for young children with advisories for coarse language and violence)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In the cavalcade of American history, there are some stories that can't be told too often. Our collective memory is appallingly short, and it is useful to be reminded that not only are we a work in progress, but also that progress, in the sense of more things improving for more people, can be bloody work. Entrenched interests like to stay entrenched, securing the status quo by means of "the law," which has been written or rewritten to their satisfaction, and the brute force that backs it up. Such was the state of some of the nation in May 1961, when 13 men and women, black and white, ages 18 to 61 — and including a young John Lewis, now a respected congressman from Georgia — boarded two buses in Washington, D.C., and headed south.
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