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Freemen Organization

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she went on trial for fraud and money laundering, Freemen disciple M. Elizabeth Broderick told jurors Wednesday that the federal government, not she, was running a scam on the American people. But a federal prosecutor insisted he will prove that Broderick, 53, of Palmdale, and two co-defendants carried out a "massive," $800-million check fraud scheme. The scam was hatched after Broderick attended a 1995 seminar by Montana Freemen leader Leroy Schweitzer, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Aaron Dyer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1996 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man pleaded guilty Friday to 13 federal felony charges stemming from his involvement in a multimillion-dollar phony check scam allegedly run by Palmdale tax resister and Montana "freemen" disciple M. Elizabeth Broderick. Adolf Hoch, 52, described by prosecutors as the "managing partner" of Broderick's alleged bogus-check operation, faces a maximum prison sentence of 165 years on the charges of money laundering, mail fraud and conspiracy. His sentencing is scheduled Nov. 12.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nine members of the anti-government "freemen" yelled and interrupted the judge as they were being formally charged with various federal crimes in Billings, Mont. "You're going down, son," Steven Charles Hance, one of the freemen, told U.S. Magistrate Richard Anderson as he was being led from the courtroom. When Assistant U.S. Atty. James Seykora asked the court to hold Hance in contempt, Hance yelled out: "Contempt? That's not a strong enough word."
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | Associated Press
A Utah man who was holed up with the "freemen" in Montana for nearly 2 1/2 months was in jail Sunday after his arrest by federal marshals. Elwin Ward had left the ranch June 6 with his wife, Gloria Ward, and her two daughters. Charges against him were not immediately clear. "I'm told it has something to do with aiding and abetting" the freemen, said Gloria Ward's sister, Lynn Nielsen, who said Ward was arrested at her mother's house Friday.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. magistrate ordered 13 anti-government "freemen" to remain in jail because they pose a risk of flight after an 81-day standoff with government authorities. The freemen remained defiant at the detention hearing, calling it "bogus" and refusing counsel. One other freeman was not present at the hearing because of a medical problem. Casey Clark will appear in court Thursday. Arraignments are scheduled for later this week.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | Associated Press
The "freemen" were afraid of being injected with cancer cells and "no brain" drugs in jail and were ready to shoot it out with federal agents at their Montana farm, according to recordings aired on "Dateline NBC." Colorado state Sen. Charles Duke, who was invited by the freemen to negotiate during the 81-day standoff, taped his conversations with members of the group and provided some of the tapes to the Sunday TV show.
NEWS
June 15, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite their peaceful surrender after an 81-day standoff with the FBI, 14 Montana "freemen" were defiant and unyielding Friday in a U.S. district courtroom, where most objected to the proceedings and refused to acknowledge the charges brought against them. But U.S. Magistrate Robert M. Holter firmly dismissed their contention that their own alternative government's rules applied in the federal legal system.
NEWS
June 15, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
No shots were fired. No lives were lost. And when the last of the "freemen" gave up their compound under a fading Montana sunset, it was clear who had won: the Federal Bureau of Investigation. After it had taken heat for nearly four years because of tragedies during confrontations at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, and Waco, Texas, the agency's time had come. It ended the 81-day standoff on the Northern Plains by following new techniques drawn up after those disasters.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An obviously relieved FBI Director Louis J. Freeh on Thursday night hailed the peaceful end of the 81-day standoff by the anti-government "freemen," saying the FBI had "put patience above the risk of bloodshed." Freeh, meeting with reporters at FBI headquarters, said the FBI "made no deals to drop or lessen the federal charges" against any of the freemen in the on-and-off-again negotiations with the group in Jordan, Mont.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last of the fugitive "freemen" gathered in a quiet circle for a final few minutes of prayer and then surrendered two-by-two into the waiting arms of the FBI late Thursday, peacefully ending an 81-day standoff--one of the longest law enforcement sieges in U.S. history. Sixteen in all, the men and women rode in cars, pickup trucks and a Winnebago motor home to a cattle guard at the entrance to their compound, where a dozen FBI agents waited with two 15-passenger vans backed up to a gate.
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