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Freeway Drivers

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
Police were searching Saturday for a wrong-way driver who allegedly caused two crashes on the Ventura Freeway, including one that sheared off an electrical pole and knocked out power to 3,000 customers. A red sport utility vehicle was seen traveling north in the freeway's southbound lanes about 2:40 a.m. Saturday near Telephone Road, according to the California Highway Patrol.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2000 | STEVE HARVEY
Have something to say to the driver in the next lane? "No more shouting through your car window!" says Dana Point-based PlateMatch.com. The Web site enables snoopy vehicle owners to register their license plates in a database for $59.95 per year and exchange e-mail with other members. It's sort of an update of a 1980s group, Huntington Beach-based Freeway Singles, whose members displayed numbered stickers on their cars. In the current version, members receive PlateMatch.com license plate frames.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2000
A man was run over and killed by his own car on the Glendale Freeway Wednesday morning after another motorist hit his disabled vehicle in the fast lane, police said. The man, whose identity was withheld until relatives could be notified, had hit the center divider in the northbound lanes of the Glendale Freeway at Colorado Street, said California Highway Patrol Officer Shirley Gaines. He got out of his car to investigate when the second accident happened, Gaines said.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed with bigger cars and increasingly frustrated with urban congestion, California drivers are breaking speed limits more often than ever on some freeways, according to experts and new state data. An analysis of state records shows a growing number of drivers are increasing their speeds where traffic lightens in many suburban areas of Southern California.
NEWS
August 2, 1999 | MEG JAMES and ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cowan Heights shoppers who forgo the summer Nordstrom sale at South Coast Plaza. Determined drivers who venture onto surface streets with battleground names like Red Hill. Humble workers who awaken before dawn. Whatever the strategy, it's all in the name of one overarching goal: avoiding the hogtied traffic mess on the Costa Mesa Freeway, which has become, well . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | KURT STREETER and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four young men and a teenage girl were killed Thursday when the car they were in went out of control on the Antelope Valley Freeway during an apparent race reaching speeds of up to 100 mph, authorities said. The car, an Acura Legend, careened off the freeway and plunged down a 75-foot embankment, said Officer Doug Sweeney, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE
A small airplane made an emergency landing beside the Riverside Freeway Thursday, backing up traffic for two hours from Anaheim to the Riverside County line as motorists slowed to take in the unusual sight. There were no injuries and the aircraft was not damaged, said Mark Reeves, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol. The plane, a 1948 Navion NA-1 low-wing single-engine aircraft, was carrying the pilot and a passenger from Corona to John Wayne Airport around 4:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A wrong-way driver charged with murder after a fatal head-on collision on the Foothill Freeway last year was convicted Thursday of gross vehicular manslaughter. Alexito Manuva, 35, could have been sentenced to 15 years to life in state prison if he had been convicted of second-degree murder in the death of 20-year-old Newhall resident Frank Rodriguez on Aug. 19, 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1997 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From one dawn to the next, a trucker's world is based on time and movement. A delay is cause to spit out a wad of tobacco, or light up a smoke, and mutter a word or two the trucker wouldn't want a kid to hear. Delays don't get the freight moved--they're more time, less movement. For a truck driver hauling goods from Los Angeles to San Diego and back, northbound Interstate 5 is the only way to go. And the San Clemente checkpoint is an unavoidable reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first things he saw were the legs. Protruding from under the partially opened hood of a car going 45 mph, the dangling pair of limbs alerted Officer Don Dugan to the fact that something was terribly wrong on the Santa Ana Freeway. "My eyes just got buggy," Dugan recalled. But the driver had an explanation.
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