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November 24, 1988 | IVARS PETERSON, Special to the Washington Post and Ivars Peterson, an editor of Science News, is the author of "The Mathematical Tourist" (W.H. Freeman), from which this article is adapted.
The structures designed by architect Frei Otto are as graceful and airy as spider webs. Translucent membranes, supported by steel-wire nets, reach out from tall masts. Anchors tie the fringes to the ground. But these ethereal forms are also anchored in practical reality. Otto, working at the Institute for Lightweight Structures in Stuttgart, West Germany, wanted to use as little construction material as possible for enclosures that are easily put up, dismantled and moved.
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NEWS
November 24, 1988 | IVARS PETERSON, Special to the Washington Post and Ivars Peterson, an editor of Science News, is the author of "The Mathematical Tourist" (W.H. Freeman), from which this article is adapted.
The structures designed by architect Frei Otto are as graceful and airy as spider webs. Translucent membranes, supported by steel-wire nets, reach out from tall masts. Anchors tie the fringes to the ground. But these ethereal forms are also anchored in practical reality. Otto, working at the Institute for Lightweight Structures in Stuttgart, West Germany, wanted to use as little construction material as possible for enclosures that are easily put up, dismantled and moved.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
American composer Steve Reich and Russian ballet star Maya Plisetskaya were among the five winners of the 2006 Praemium Imperiale arts awards for lifetime achievements, announced Thursday. French sculptor Christian Boltanski, German architect Frei Otto and Japanese painter Yayoi Kusama were also named as laureates. Given annually by the Japan Art Assn. in fields not covered by the Nobel Prizes, the awards carry cash prizes of $131,000.
NEWS
January 23, 2003 | Lynell George
Revisiting Coltrane's 'Supreme' As desert island discs go, saxophonist John Coltrane's "A Love Supreme" is reserved for those who book a special atoll. Famously variegated, the 1964 album has long enchanted and confounded musicians and laymen.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2011 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE
Farmers Field has somehow gotten lighter on its feet and more bloated at the same time. A new version of AEG's proposed NFL football stadium and event center in downtown Los Angeles was unveiled Tuesday afternoon. The latest design by Ronald Turner of the firm Gensler represents a marked attempt to give the complex more transparency and openness than was contained in a largely conceptual version released late last year. Instead of an expensive retractable roof, the 72,000-seat stadium will be topped by what AEG calls a "deployable" roof, a collection of light fabric panels that can be stored outside the stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
For the third time in five years, the Pritzker Prize is going to a Japanese architect. Shigeru Ban , a 56-year-old architect born in Tokyo, was named the winner of his profession's top honor on Monday. Yet Ban's architecture is markedly different, in form and sensibility, from the work of recent Pritzker winners from Japan. He's best known for quickly assembled buildings, many made of cardboard or shipping containers, designed for parts of the world reeling from war or natural disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Reporting from London — One morning about two weeks ago, having made my way from central London to the site of next summer's Olympic Games, I stood on a wide terrace emerging from the just-completed aquatic center. From the edge of that building, designed by Zaha Hadid and nicknamed the "stingray," I had a panoramic view of the Olympic Park, which covers 500 acres in a once-industrial section of the Lower Lea Valley, on the eastern edge of London. The main Olympic Stadium, designed by American firm Populous in collaboration with the British architect Peter Cook, rose directly in front of me. I also had a clear view of Wilkinson Eyre's basketball venue, a temporary structure made of pillowy white fabric panels.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
SINCE winning the right six years ago to hold the 2006 World Cup, Germany has raced to build new stadiums and update old ones around the country. Some of these soccer temples have already become architectural icons, including the dazzling Allianz Arena in Munich by the Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron, where the opening match will take place on Friday.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | IVARS PETERSON, Washington Post and Ivars Peterson, an editor of Science News, is the author of "The Mathematical Tourist" (W.H. Freeman), from which this article is adapted.
The structures designed by architect Frei Otto are graceful and airy as spider webs. Translucent membranes, supported by steel-wire nets, reach out from tall masts. Anchors tie the fringes to the ground. But these ethereal forms are also anchored in practical reality. Otto, working at the Institute for Lightweight Structures in Stuttgart, West Germany, wanted to use as little construction material as possible for enclosures that are easily built, dismantled and moved.
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