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WORLD
December 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
France's army said it was ready to keep a big force in Ivory Coast for years to end war in the former West African colony as rebel fury exploded at French troops for blocking an advance. Three rebel factions are to meet today to mull whether to go on the offensive against the French, who opened fire to stop insurgents from taking a key junction in the cocoa-growing region. Ivory Coast's war sprang from a failed Sept. 19 coup. Hundreds of people have been killed in fighting.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2013
Alain Mimoun, 92, an Algerian-born French distance runner who won the 1956 Olympic marathon after losing three Olympic races to Czech great Emil Zatopek, died Thursday. France's athletics federation announced his death but did not provide other details. Mimoun won silver in the 10,000-meter race at the 1948 London Olympics and in the 5,000 and 10,000 at the 1952 Helsinki Games - narrowly missing the Olympic gold medal each time to Zatopek. Reporters called Mimoun "the little shadow. " For the 1956 Games in Melbourne, Australia, Mimoun switched to the marathon from shorter-distance races.
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WORLD
December 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
French troops have discovered a mass grave in rebel-held territory in central Ivory Coast, a French army spokesman said Friday. The grave -- 30 yards by 2 yards -- was found Thursday afternoon northwest of the town of Daloa, French Lt. Col. Ange-Antoine Leccia said. "We do not know how many bodies are there, who killed these people or when," he said. "It is not our mission to exhume the bodies, and we are simply reporting what we have found."
WORLD
January 26, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
SEGOU, Mali - French and Malian forces on Saturday drove Al Qaeda-linked Islamists out of a key city in northern Mali, a major advance in France's campaign against insurgents in the West African nation. The French military in Paris announced the capture of Gao, according to news agency reports. Gao is the largest city in the north and the most important Islamist stronghold to fall since French forces arrived this month. The fall of Gao followed an operation involving French special forces, who took control of the airport and a bridge outside the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pierre Messmer, 91, a French government official who headed the overhaul of the army after the Algerian civil war and served as prime minister from 1972 to 1974, died Wednesday at Val-de-Grace hospital in Paris. Messmer joined the French Resistance in 1940, fleeing Nazi-occupied France for England on a cargo ship. He then participated in major campaigns in North Africa and elsewhere and stormed the beaches of Normandy in June 1944.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Army transport trucks moved into Paris on Tuesday night to assist hundreds of thousands of commuters stranded by Communist-led transportation strikes on suburban trains and the Metro subway. The strikes have caused huge traffic jams for the last two days as two of the four main suburban rail systems, used by up to 1 million commuters, were closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1987 | Associated Press
The historic Rochambeau elm, a Baltimore landmark, was cut down Saturday, a victim of Dutch elm disease. It was estimated to be 275 years old. Legend says Count de Rochambeau, commander of the French army in America during the Revolutionary War, camped his troops and erected an altar for Mass at the site in 1782.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1986 | JAY SHARBUTT
According to Francois Forestier, a film writer for L'Express magazine in Paris, the first time a Vietnam veteran made a movie about the war, the story concerned a much earlier conflict--the Indochina war that the French army lost to the Viet Minh. The French-language film was "The 317th Section" by Pierre Schoendoerffer, a French army combat cameraman captured when Dienbienphu fell to Ho Chi Minh's forces in 1954.
NEWS
February 18, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been a century since the French army framed Alfred Dreyfus, a young Jewish captain, on a charge of passing secrets to the Germans, convicted him in a closed-door court-martial and shipped him off to Devil's Island with a life prison sentence. Everyone involved in that shameful episode died long ago. Dreyfus himself was eventually exonerated and returned to active duty, fighting alongside his son in World War I and receiving the French Legion of Honor medal.
NEWS
August 22, 1985
New Zealand police said that the woman held in the sinking of the Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior is a French army officer. Detective Allan Galbraith said in Auckland that New Zealand detectives working in France have established that the woman charged under the name of Sophie Claire Turenge is actually Capt. Dominique Prieur. French newspapers had said she worked for France's espionage agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012
Pierre Schoendoerffer, 83, an Oscar-winning French filmmaker who was held prisoner in Indochina and chronicled the pain of war on screen and on the page, died Wednesday, the French military health service said. France's Le Figaro newspaper said Schoendoerffer died in a hospital outside Paris after an operation. Born in central France on May 5, 1928, Schoendoerffer served as a cameraman in the French army in the 1950s and volunteered to be parachuted into the besieged fortress of Dien Bien Phu, where the decisive battle of the French war in Indochina was fought.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
"Mesrine" is a thug's life writ very large, so large that it takes two films and more than four hours of screen time to tell it. But then French gangster Jacques Mesrine was not just any thug, but a violent criminal with a gift for publicity and philosophical self-dramatization, someone who came to realize his life was playing out like a movie and relished every bit of it. Described by a French police detective as "a gangster with marketing savvy,"...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pierre Messmer, 91, a French government official who headed the overhaul of the army after the Algerian civil war and served as prime minister from 1972 to 1974, died Wednesday at Val-de-Grace hospital in Paris. Messmer joined the French Resistance in 1940, fleeing Nazi-occupied France for England on a cargo ship. He then participated in major campaigns in North Africa and elsewhere and stormed the beaches of Normandy in June 1944.
TRAVEL
July 16, 2006 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
MANY travelers in southern England have seen and wondered about the squat, round bastions along the coast. The English built about 75 of these Martello towers after 1800 as a defense system against invasion from France during the Napoleonic Wars. Today, they symbolize the long, testy relationship between two countries that have been locked in battle -- or yoked together as unwilling allies when threatened by a common enemy.
NEWS
March 2, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
ON Dec. 24, 1914, not all was quiet on the Western Front during World War I. Gun and cannon fire erupted on that cold, snowy night along battle lines that stretched from northern Belgium to Switzerland. But several other sounds could be heard on Christmas Eve -- including the singing of "Silent Night," the cheers from impromptu soccer games, the cacophony of revelry and even the hushed tones of Latin Mass during midnight services.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
With U.S.-French relations at a modern-day low, it may seem like a strange time for an American network to be celebrating the life of France's greatest warrior with an epic miniseries. Thankfully, A&E's two-part, four-hour "Napoleon," airing tonight and Wednesday at 8 p.m., won't make relations any more acrimonious.
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A French military attache in Washington, apparently caught up in an espionage controversy there, has been recalled home and assigned to an obscure post, the French army said. A French military spokesman said the officer, Col. Marc Wood, "had committed what we consider a blunder." He declined to comment on reports that Wood, reportedly a nuclear weapons specialist, was accused of handing confidential U.S. documents to India, which is seeking to create a nuclear arsenal despite U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1996
Today is the 134th anniversary of Cinco de Mayo- commemorating the Battle of Puebla-in which a ragtag group of Mexican fighters soundly defeated the French army on May 5, 1862. While it was a minor setback for the French who had occupied Mexico a few months before, the victory became a rallying point for those wanting Mexico's freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2003 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
Americans haven't been very nice to their French friends lately. First, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, frustrated at France's outspoken position that the international community pursue a peaceful disarmament of Iraq, dismissed the country as part of "the old Europe." Then America's longtime allies were called "weasels," "cowards" and "cheese-eating surrender monkeys." There were threats to boycott their wines and cheeses as punishment for not supporting a speedy war.
WORLD
January 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Stone-throwing mobs attacked the French Embassy and army base in Ivory Coast on Sunday as thousands marched to protest a French-brokered peace accord that they say yields too much to rebels. The massive protests underlined the problems facing the power-sharing deal agreed to by President Laurent Gbagbo in Paris last week to end the four-month war that has thrown the world's top cocoa producer into chaos.
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